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Roland noise eater products

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  • Roland noise eater products

    Anybody using the new Roland noise eaters for under the kit and hi hat pedals and also the noise eater feet under the hi hat feet and even the rack legs ? If so how do they work and how overpriced are they

  • #2
    According to Roland they reduce noise and vibration considerably. As they are Roland products, they are most definitely over priced!

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    • #3
      Hi Kennyin, Roland says they are quiet and help with the vibration but I was hoping somebody here actually owned them before I would spring for them. Let me know if anybody you know has them and what they say, ok?

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      • #4
        Hi hemi. Im sure I read another thread about them but I cant remember if they said tthey were any good or not. Have you done a search?

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        • #5
          Yeah I think the guy Drew from Roland posted about them as O recall now that you mention it . I will search it

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          • #6
            In the other thread I promised to review an NE-10. I did buy one weeks ago, but haven't called my neighbor yet to see how loud it is.
            Procrastination has been getting the better of me.

            I can tell you about the design of the NE-10's at any rate.

            The good news is it is basically a high-tech version of the tennis ball riser.

            In more detail:
            - it is quite heavy, due to a thick metal plate that forms the middle layer. Tennis ball riser builders found that a heavy board (MDF) helped dampen sound, same idea here I guess.
            - On top is a thin layer of industrial carpet, so your pedal cleats can dig in and keep it from moving.
            - The bottom is a thick formed rubber layer that has twelve (six per side, none in the center) soft hollow rubber feet about the size of golf-ball halves. You can squish them like you would a tennis ball that was cut in half. Actually they are squishier than that. This is identical to the idea of the tennis ball riser from what I can tell.

            I would hazard a guess (since I still haven't tested it) it will be as good or better than a tennis ball riser.
            I suspect better since they had the opportunity to tune the thing for maximum sound reduction.

            Unless you play a Krigg and an FD-7/8, the system is heavily dependent on the NE-1's which I still haven't seen yet. It is a safe bet they aren't soft hollow rubber feet, or they would never hold the weight of a KD-140, and therefore may not dampen sound as effectively as the NE-10's. That means that FD-8 + Krigg with NE-10's may be the quietest solution without going DIY at the moment.

            Edit: the NE-10 held my weight (165 lbs) easily, so it would do fine with a KD-140. That probably means the NE-1's are fine too.
            Last edited by kurth83; 03-30-14, 03:11 AM.
            Mini-kit: TD-9 + Alesis Control Pad + Alesis Sample Pad + PDX-6 snare
            Micro-kit: Handsonic HPD-20 + an old pair of hands.
            Speakers: QSC-K10 "thumper", DBR-10 "little thumper"

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            • hemiboy
              hemiboy commented
              Editing a comment
              I think I could make my own from some left over mdf from my riser build, carpet with a rubberized bottom glued to the top and sorbothane half circle feet glued to the bottom , .

          • #7
            Thanks for the info Kurth

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            • hemiboy
              hemiboy commented
              Editing a comment
              Kurth, I forgot to ask you. Do use a double kick pedal and if so does the side by the hi hat come wide enough to fit under the kick pedal and a hi hat pedal . Just trying to find out how much money so need to dedicate to this purchase. They list for a hundred a piece , right plus 35 a piece for the ne-1's? Typical Roland pricing!

          • #8
            I tried putting my weight on it and it didn't collapse, it can hold a KD-140 according to its doc, so my worries it being weight limited were wrong.

            In Roland's promo material they show two NE-10's side by side for a double and a hat together and a third NE-10 under the right kick pedal.

            So could run around $500 for a full kit with the NE's.

            Check out the pics here on Amazon:

            http://www.amazon.com/Roland-NE-10-N...s=Roland+NE-10

            Looks like the NE-1s can be had for $25 though.
            Mini-kit: TD-9 + Alesis Control Pad + Alesis Sample Pad + PDX-6 snare
            Micro-kit: Handsonic HPD-20 + an old pair of hands.
            Speakers: QSC-K10 "thumper", DBR-10 "little thumper"

            Comment


            • #9
              Originally posted by kurth83 View Post
              So could run around $500 for a full kit with the NE's.

              You gotta be kidding me...

              ...for something they essentially ...ahem.... 'borrowed' from the DIY crowd?
              ...a little tweaking here and there, and voila - a three-digit price tag?


              I think I'll go wake up 'n' shake up that yogi bear...!
              .
              .
              Greetings from Switzerland,
              - Dänoh



              "My best friends' name is J-SON. They used to call him 'Mr. Parse.' He has an 'Error'..!"

              http://www.vdrums.com/forum/core/cus...ar33631_4.jpeg

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              • #10
                Yeah my son and I just built the platfoam drum riser and that was 400 by the time we bought the fiberboard and the foam and glue. I was thinking of a little extra sound proofing, but not for that money. I could buy a used kit for that kind of money or put out a hit on my troublesome neighbor downstairs, lol

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                • #11
                  That's unusual...an overpriced product from Roland? Never lol

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                  • #12
                    500? my dual layer drum riser cost less than that, and I went way overboard
                    Dual Alesis Module Drum Set (DM10(BlueJay)+DM8+Trigger iO), Dual Layer Tennis Ball Drum Riser
                    Shure SE215 IEM's, Simmons DA50 Amp, Alto Professional ZMX862 Mixer, Tama SpeedCobra Pedals, Vic Firth 7AN Sticks, Roc-N-Soc Original Throne

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                    • #13
                      For the price they want for these, I expect a group of Roland employees to come to my home and act as sound-proofing between floors.

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                      • #14
                        Yeah their products are great overall and a few years ago they were basically the only real contender in electronic drums, but not anymore! Even though Roland is huge with tons of money behind them, they can't deny that they have definite competition from 2 box, Alesis, Yamaha, Kat percussion, Mark drum just to name a few. And if these acoustic drum makers really get into the act by not just making drums but digging into electronic technology, like building drum modules with samples of all their own kits, Real drum sounds and real drums, what would be better? Plus all the other electronic sounds out there and they will blow Rolandthem away. I think all the acoustic companies will go after this market, but the most likely candidate is a player already, Yamaha, I think 2box and Tama shells with the external 2 box and maybe even an internal 2 box trigger are already in the works, too .
                        Last edited by hemiboy; 03-30-14, 08:42 PM.

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                        • #15
                          Indeed! With every NAMM and Musikmesse shows, the other bigger companies that you mentioned shows of better and better things that they're launching, Roland is not the only way to go anymore. And sure, you get what you pay for in terms of price/quality, but that can be applied to almost anything.
                          And these noise eaters are a couple of rubber feet and tennis ball raiser, the latter one we know can be done without too much work or a fat wallet. So if they are planning on keeping their big piece of the market I think they need to re-think the pricing of some of their stuff, just because their drums trumps most others does not mean everyone will buy whatever they throw at us at whatever price they want for it.

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