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PD120 Head tension?

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  • PD120 Head tension?

    I just picked up a used PD120 for use with my TD10. It's my only mesh vdrum pad, the others are rubber PD7 and PD9's.

    The drum arrived with slack tension. I tightened it up a bit but not as much as I would on a real snare drum. Are there any guidelines for tensioning those mesh heads? I'd like to try it tighter but am not sure about how tight I can go.

    Thanks
    -Bill

  • #2
    thanks

    That is so cool! I was wondering what the tuning thing on the screen meant. I figured it was some way to calibrate the TD10 settings after the head was tuned up (which you'd do by touch). Not the other way around. Can't way to try it. Thanks.

    -Bill

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    • #3
      Just make sure you are Very consistent in where and how hard you hit the head. Even 3-5 mm is enough to change the readings. Play with it a bit before you go to lock in the settings.

      Good Luck.

      $pace @ce
      $pace @ce

      Comment


      • #4
        pd120 - tightening, tuning, rim, etc.

        I must admit that as much as I like my 120, it's one of the more frustrating parts of my set up. I'm using it with my TD-6 and I'm sure I haven't got it adjusted correctly.

        My frustration stems from the lack of rim triggering consistancy. There are too many places along the rim that don't trigger correctly/consistantly. I've been careful about how I apply the stick to the rim.

        I made sure that I set the input for the snare for the PD-120 on the TD-6. I've messed with the sensitvity settings. But I still can't get a consistant triggering of the rim.

        I'm convinced it is related to the head tension, but I'm not knowledgeable enough to set it manually. I'm afraid I will turn it too tight or inconsistantly.
        Scott
        Frisco, TX
        Current drummer for Dan Scot Parr
        http://www.danscotparr.com

        Comment


        • #5
          I also own a TD-6. There is a section in the PD-120 owners manual that shows that there is a quadrant where the rim works properly (probably due to the placement of the piezo that I can see). It is 45 degrees to either side of the output jack. I have found that I have no problems when I hit it there. When mounted on a rack, that quadrant is to my left. So I bought a snare stand and have turned it around 180 degrees. Now I can cross-stick properly (and accurately).

          Here's a question I have. Is taking the mounting bracket off as simple as removing the screws? It looks like it is and I was about to just do it. But it doesn't hurt to ask.

          Comment


          • #6
            Center Hits...

            I wanted to ask if anyone else has a "dead zone" in the center of their snare. Not that it feels dead, but that produces that dull, thwack sound from the brain. Just like a real snare...

            Seems about 1" up from center is the perfect snare sound on my PD120... Anyone else have this same "sweet spot"?
            Mapex Acoustic Birch 6pc Kit - Sabian Cymbals - PC Recorder/MIDI: Sonar 2.2 - M Audio Audiophile 24/96 / Avance AC97 - Samson 65A Monitors - Building a V-drum revolution kit: 3 - 10" Toms, 14" Snare, 2 - 16" Crashes, 12" Hats, 10" Mesh Kick - MODULE TO BE DETERMINED...

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            • #7
              yes my pd120 is like my 80s - if you hit the cone in the centre, it's twice as loud. damn annoying, don't know how to avoid it.
              "My wife and I were happy for twenty years. Then we met."

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              • #8
                My PD120 doesn't do that at all. It works great. What's weird is that I'm using the less expensive TD-6. I wonder if that has anything to do with it?

                Comment


                • #9
                  My TD-10 does not give me the problem and tends to react more like a "real" drum . I have noticed that when you start to tweak your trigger settings, the problem becomes noticeable. I have used the same exact kits at home and on our Church kit. The only difference is in the trigger settings. They have more crosstalk to deal with and some of the sensitivity is up. (I'm not sure what else has been adjusted, I'm not their only drummer.) Their kit has the problem when mine does not. I have been wondering if worn cones could be a contributor. Both kits are near the 4 yr old mark but theirs obviously has had more and harder use.
                  Kit Pic 1 Kit Pic 2 Kit Pic 3... And FOR SALE I have: 3 PD-9's, MDS-10 purple rack w/cables/pad and cym mounts. See classified posts for details or PM me.

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