Welcome! If this is your first visit, you will need to register to participate.

DO NOT use symbols in usernames. Doing so will result in an inability to sign in & post!

If you cannot sign in or post, please visit our vBulletin Talk section for answers to vBulletin related FAQs.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

PD-105 (rack mount) vs. PD-125 (snare stand): stick noise & neighbors?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • PD-105 (rack mount) vs. PD-125 (snare stand): stick noise & neighbors?

    PD-105 (rack mount) vs. PD-125 (snare stand): stick noise & neighbors?

    I had been planning on getting a PD-105 for a snare (upgrading from my PD-85), but after spending all that money, the PD-125 isn't so much more, and would give a larger playing surface for brushes (which wouldn't be my main use, but which I am interested in).

    However, the biggest factor for me is that I live in an apartment with a downstairs neighbor. Does anyone have an opinion on if either option would be quieter and/or easier to damp floor vibrations from [than the other]?

  • #2
    The PD 125 on a stand is probably no more or less noisy than the 105, regardless of whether they are rack or stand mounted, but noise from your mesh pads should be the least of your worries.

    Have you already been playing your drums in this apartment? If so, and if there are no problems with it now, I think it is unlikely there will be any complaints resulting from using a pad on a stand. Anyway, it would be simple enough just to place the snare stand on peices of heavy foam (the rubbery kind like they use for hand rests in front of a computer keyboard) if need be.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by stickinthemud View Post
      The PD 125 on a stand is probably no more or less noisy than the 105, regardless of whether they are rack or stand mounted, but noise from your mesh pads should be the least of your worries.

      Have you already been playing your drums in this apartment? If so, and if there are no problems with it now
      Yes, I am already playing drums (a little!) in this apartment; and I wouldn't exactly say there have been "no problems with it now". Unfortunately.


      The apartment below me was vacant for the past three years, but somebody moved in two weeks ago.

      Comment


      • #4
        So, anyone else have thoughts on this? It would seem to me that the somewhat lighter PD-105 mounted on a stand arm might send somewhat less vibrations into the floor than a bigger PD-125 that, when mounted securely on a snare stand, would essentially be sending the energy from each stick hit directly into the floor/neighbor's ceiling (via the snare stand legs).

        Of course, when mounted on the kit's stand, the hits on the PD-105 would also end up going to the floor through the stand's legs, but perhaps the more indirect path dissapates the hits somewhat? I dunno.

        It seems like the larger playing surface of the PD-125 is much preferred, and they almost cost the same [amazingly high price], but noise concerns with the downstairs neighbor have become the paramount issue.

        My stand is the TD-3SW kit's stand, the MDS-3C, that I am going to try to stick with for now, so mounting the big PD-125 on it wouldn't seem practical.

        Any thoughts or experiences would be appreciated!
        -David

        Comment


        • #5
          I tried a PD-125 mounted on a an MDS-3C and it just didn't seem stable...I ended up getting a stand which improved stability and triggering. I think the size of a PD-125 seems a lot more natural than the PD-105

          With regard to vibration isolation you could build a wooden platform with tennis balls on the corners...which has been documented here.....or...something which I haven't tried but I think may be effective....build a platform and put pumped up/partially pumped up cycle inner tubes in the corners. I would have thought this may be more effective at isolating vibrations than tennis balls (but may be be a little bouncy)
          Damian Blunt
          Toontrack Quality Assurance Manager
          TD-20 RMP-12 (Snare) PD-125, 2 x PD-105, 1 x KD-120, VH-12, CY-15R, CY-14, CY-12R/C, 2 x CY-8, CY-5, MDS-12C

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by grandaddy View Post
            I tried a PD-125 mounted on a an MDS-3C and it just didn't seem stable...I ended up getting a stand which improved stability and triggering.
            That's what I've been figureing.


            I think the size of a PD-125 seems a lot more natural than the PD-105
            Seems like pretty much everyone agrees on that. On the other hand, I've been using a PD-85 as my snare for almost 3 years now, so the PD-105 would be a definite upgrade regardless. I'll be reasonably happy with either one, I'm sure. But like you said, the PD-125 would seem to be a bit better.

            or...something which I haven't tried but I think may be effective....build a platform and put pumped up/partially pumped up cycle inner tubes in the corners. I would have thought this may be more effective at isolating vibrations than tennis balls (but may be be a little bouncy)
            Interesting! I have no easy way of getting big pieces of plywood and routing out tennis ball holes (I not only live overseas, but out in the sticks overseas!), but I coud easily lay down some half-inflated bicycle inner tubes. Hmmm...

            A thought that had occurred to me the other night was a semi-inflatable camping roll that goes under your sleeping bag or tent (I forget the brand name at the moment, but the [standard] ones I used to use when backpacking were orange). There actually are a lot of well-equipped camping supply stores around here ('Northface'-type stuff). Not super cheap, but could do the trick.

            Comment


            • #7
              If your new neighbor has not complained about the kick pad, they will not complain about a PD-125 on a stand. It really doesn't transfer that much vibration.
              sigpic

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Michael Render View Post
                If your new neighbor has not complained about the kick pad, they will not complain about a PD-125 on a stand. It really doesn't transfer that much vibration.
                They have complained.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Well, there you are. You will have to isolate the kit from the floor somehow. The point is, it's the vibrations from the kick drum, more than any other item including a PD125 on a stand, that will bother your neighbor downstairs.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by stickinthemud View Post
                    Well, there you are. You will have to isolate the kit from the floor somehow. The point is, it's the vibrations from the kick drum, more than any other item including a PD125 on a stand, that will bother your neighbor downstairs.
                    Okay, that's a good way of putting it. Still, any contributions to lowering the overall noise level would seem to help.

                    But, I see your point -- it's not the limiting factor. So, if I'm able to get the drums up on a riser that will stop kick noises, it would also be stopping the [lesser] snare-on-a-stand noise.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by dmt View Post
                      Okay, that's a good way of putting it. Still, any contributions to lowering the overall noise level would seem to help.

                      But, I see your point -- it's not the limiting factor. So, if I'm able to get the drums up on a riser that will stop kick noises, it would also be stopping the [lesser] snare-on-a-stand noise.
                      Perzactly.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Quiet kick pedal!!

                        Wow-- i have to chime in... the kick pedals on the Roland V-Drums Lite (HD-1) are great and are beaterless, and are quiet and more importantly exert almost no vibration into the floor as they distribute vibration through the stand by virtue of their being horizontally connected to the main "pillars" of the mounting "rack".

                        The HD-1 is a great practice kit. Only thing is it has to be on a level floor or it will shake side to side if you do double bass rolls or lots of heel up footwork. especially on carpet like I have with thick underpadding. I bought a 3/4 inch thick oak board (4 foot by 3 foot) for my throne and the drums to sit on. Also hammered in some diagonally-oriented stopper bars to prevent the kit from creeping forward.

                        I couldn't imagine a more portable or convenient or quieter practice kit being available in this world than the HD-1... and it's cheap.

                        Only problem is the foot pedals aren't compatible with most other electronic kits including roland's own high end kits.
                        Last edited by gary1010; 12-16-08, 10:24 AM. Reason: wanted to subscribe to thread

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I stuck those acoustic drum muffling pads (the big round black ones) under my bass drum pedals and the stands, and it greatly reduces the floor vibrations. Had to fold them in half though to get double the effect. Actually I didn't put them under the bass drum pedal, I put them under my KD-120 leg stands.
                          TD-12, KD-120, CY15, CY14.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            My UPDATED TD9-KX - http://i53.photobucket.com/albums/g5...0/P2240044.jpg

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X