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TD-3KW or TD-6KW

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  • TD-3KW or TD-6KW

    Hello, I'm a newbie in here as well as in playing on drums, I want to buy an electronic drums, I don't want to waste much money for it because of parents and, well, brain as well, I don't want to give lots of money for something i'm starting with now, but that is not the problem. I'm deciding between rolands td-6kw and td-3kw, I'll be playing at my home mostly for fun and maybe for some recordings to pc, is there any difference between td-3kw and td-6kw set? I mean does the td6 have better sounds or anything? I don't care if it has more sounds, I don't think that I will need most of them anyway. I'm looking for big differences like td3 doesn't have something that td6 has, I don't know what example I should give you ...Thanks for answers.

  • #2
    Hi, and welcome to the forum.
    I'd say the biggest difference would be Hi-Hat control is way better in the 6, the module is more versatile too, many more sounds, of which some are useless, but many aren't, and you WILL use a lot of them eventually.
    Also you have way more inputs to upgrade with later.
    The 6 all the way for me.

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    • #3
      The 3 is actually a newer set, with newer sounds, but the 6 has more sounds, ie more flexibility..I know you said it wasnt important, but you may find out it is...and you can get the sounds to be really good sounding via vex packs: http://www.vexpressionsltd.com/

      the three has coaching functtions, which I admit, i never use, prefering just to play, the 6 has a lot of backing tracks...

      I started with the six, enjoyed it a lot, and then upgraded to a td9

      either way, they are both good kits and will be satisfactory
      TD9+6v with Diamond Electronic pads, and cowbell.
      ATH-50m headphones, VEX packs
      not to mention keyboards, guitars, basses, and cats

      Comment


      • #4
        The TD-3 has better sounds (if you are trying to sound like a "real" aka "acoustic" drum set), though they are quite limited in number. There are 32 kits, but most of them are just mixing and matching a few basic sounds into different kits.

        The TD-6 has tons of kits, most (but not all!) of which are completely useless (IMO). I'm talking like for rock, not dance or electronica or whatever.

        The TD-3 has one coaching function I use sometimes, but overall I haven't used it nearly as much as I'd expected.

        The TD-6 has the backing tracks and an onboard sequencer, so you can play back what you just drummed, right there from the module (as opposed to having to record your playing on a seperate recorder, such as your computer).

        By splitting the connecting cables, you could use the tom rims on the TD-6 to get extra inputs.

        The TD-3 is very easy to use. It can't really do very much, so there isn't much in the way of difficult multi-layer menus to scroll through with just function buttons and a jog dial, viewed through a little LCD screen. There's a LED readout, and individual buttons for almost everything right there on the unit. The manual is easy to read, all the basic functions (like volume of individual pads, panning, sensitivity of a pad, etc.) are easy to get to and master. The TD-6, while hardly the most complicated unit out there, is a bit more to master. For example, try reading through the MIDI Implementation sections of the TD-3 and the TD-6 manual and compare. I got my TD-3's MIDI up and running the first night, and had everything figured out a day or two later; while my friend with a TD-6 never figured it out until over a year later when he finally got another [experienced] TD-6 user to come over and help him. Now, that's partly him being not-so-tech/hardware oriented, but on the other hand, he's generally better with computers than I am.

        The TD-6 is more capable and has more inputs; the TD-3 has a limited selection of better sounds and, because it is limited, is very easy to use (not to mention less expensive). Basically, you could make an argument either way. If you plan to use the module mainly to trigger EZ Drummer or something like that, the quality of the onboard sounds becomes less important.

        Both are good possibilities. Just decide what your needs are and which one lines up better with them.
        Last edited by dmt; 11-28-08, 10:26 AM.

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        • #5
          Haluzak,

          I started with the TD-3 and within a year and a half had upgraded the whole kit. I skipped a couple of rungs on the Roland ladder and went with a TD-12.

          Going with the TD-6 might save you an upgrade for a while. You can get the v-expression drum kits for it and it is overall more capable. so spending a little more may save you a bit in the long run. Finding a used or a close out TD-6 could also save you some $ and work for you longer.

          The stock sounds are better on the TD-3 but it's much more limited than the TD-6.

          You'll also need a kick pedal, throne and maybe even an amp. Also remember that v-drums aren't silent and there are sometimes problems with neighbors. you can find threads about this.

          good luck, let us know what you end up with.
          Michael

          TD-12/Gibraltar rack/Pintech Concertcast drums 12" snare, 1 12" tom, 2 10" toms, 8" mesh kick, Visulite cymbals, 14" dual zone crash, 13" hi-hat, 18" 3 zone ride and 2 Dingbats, Roland PM-10, iPod, Zildjian anti-vibe sticks, Roc-N-Soc throne with backrest, Yamaha snare stand, Tama Iron Cobra pedal and HH75W hi-hat stand, Sennheiser HDR 110 wireless headphones. V-expressions 80's and 90's Giggin' Kits and Both Top 50 drummers (hopefully functional soon)

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Picksorsticks View Post
            Haluzak,

            I started with the TD-3 and within a year and a half had upgraded the whole kit. I skipped a couple of rungs on the Roland ladder and went with a TD-12.
            I'm upgrading (hopefully -- haven't pulled the trigger yet) to the TD-12 after about 2 1/2 years with my TD-3. But, I was sick and couldn't play for about a year in there, so actually, my experience is similar to Picksorsticks. After about a year and a half of playing the TD-3, I strongly want to upgrade (and the -9 wouldn't be quite enough to satisfy me at this point).

            However, I have really enjoyed my TD-3. It was a HUGE improvement over the MUCH fancier Alesis DM Pro Kit that I started with (and also used for about 2 1/2 years).

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks for all your answers guys, I think that i'm going to save a bit money and buy td-3, when i get to it I might buy something better, I'm going to academy this year so I don't know what my possibilities will be so I don't want to put much more money to it for my drumset to stand at home unused, I'm glad that td-3 has better sounds that may be enough for me even if not so much. So I'm going to stick with td-3 yet and I'll see how i'll progress in some years ...thanks for answers again!

              Comment


              • #8
                You'll be happy with the TD-3. it's a great starter kit. You can always add more later.

                The TD-3 is easy to set up and use. The learning curve isn't very steep. I'm still taking baby steps with the TD-12. On the TD-3, kit #1, sounds very good and I pretty much just used that one.

                good luck at the academy!
                Michael

                TD-12/Gibraltar rack/Pintech Concertcast drums 12" snare, 1 12" tom, 2 10" toms, 8" mesh kick, Visulite cymbals, 14" dual zone crash, 13" hi-hat, 18" 3 zone ride and 2 Dingbats, Roland PM-10, iPod, Zildjian anti-vibe sticks, Roc-N-Soc throne with backrest, Yamaha snare stand, Tama Iron Cobra pedal and HH75W hi-hat stand, Sennheiser HDR 110 wireless headphones. V-expressions 80's and 90's Giggin' Kits and Both Top 50 drummers (hopefully functional soon)

                Comment

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