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Starter kit - TD3

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  • Starter kit - TD3

    Hi,

    I've decided to start drumming again after a ~6 year break... really looking forward to it. I don't have any gear at all, so will be looking to get both an acoustic kit and an electronic kit. The electronic kit will basically be for practise so as not to annoy the neighbours. The acoustic kit will be for "sociable" practicing and gigging.

    Anyway, I'm new to Edrums, and been doing some research. The TD-3 or TD-6 looks like a good starter kit for me, but in my research I found a couple of "cheaper alternatives", namely the Millenium MPS-300/400 series. I had never heard of them and reviews of them on ye olde t'interweb seem to be non-existent.

    I'm looking at this:

    http://www.thomann.de/gb/millenium_m...pecial_set.htm

    compared with say this:

    http://www.thomann.de/gb/roland_td3k...lett_vdrum.htm

  • #2
    I made the mistake of getting a cheap kit first...the pads started to come apart, they werent as responsive to playing and I ended up getting a td 6 anyway after a few months...I would definitely say to go with the td3, otherwise you will just be disappointed - or frustrated . for reference, the td 6 is no longer produced though you can probably find second hand kits....the swedish magazine Studio tested various entry level drum kits, and the millenium family fared very badly, compared to the yamahas and rolands....

    Thomann isnt the cheapest around - my local shops are cheaper - and they dont always ship free - drum-tec is an alternative...
    TD9+6v with Diamond Electronic pads, and cowbell.
    ATH-50m headphones, VEX packs
    not to mention keyboards, guitars, basses, and cats

    Comment


    • #3
      I would go for a second hand Roland entry/middle model or a new Roland entry model. Buying cheap means cheap stuff which breaks apart easily and doesn't play nice. Garuanteed to make you stop drumming in no time.

      Comment


      • #4
        I started out with a td3 2 years ago. I recently upgraded the module to a td12 and in all honesty my whole kit (even the old pads!) feels like a new drumset. So I recommend going with something that will last (or at least different parts of it). That way you can upgrade it a bit at a time if you want more.
        Drum:

        Software:

        Guitar: Vox AD50VT-XL;

        Bass: Fender Rumble 60

        Comment


        • #5
          I also started wit the TD-3. I upgraded the pads after adding the Dingbat.

          I also then went wit the TD-12 and upgraded the rack and cymbals.

          The TD-3 served me well for over a year, it's a great starter set. The TD-3 with the mesh drums was a MUCH nicer kit. Now with the new module/rack/cymbals it's on a whole different level.

          Good luck !
          Michael

          TD-12/Gibraltar rack/Pintech Concertcast drums 12" snare, 1 12" tom, 2 10" toms, 8" mesh kick, Visulite cymbals, 14" dual zone crash, 13" hi-hat, 18" 3 zone ride and 2 Dingbats, Roland PM-10, iPod, Zildjian anti-vibe sticks, Roc-N-Soc throne with backrest, Yamaha snare stand, Tama Iron Cobra pedal and HH75W hi-hat stand, Sennheiser HDR 110 wireless headphones. V-expressions 80's and 90's Giggin' Kits and Both Top 50 drummers (hopefully functional soon)

          Comment


          • #6
            I'm getting the sense that either no-one knows about the Millenium stuff... or wouldn't touch it with a barge pole... ?

            Comment


            • #7
              The cheaper kits are more like toys than musical instruments. The people around here are either (semi-) pro or enthusiastic hobby players. They want quality products and not toys. Moreover, this site is Roland orientated. Therefore these reactions were to be expected.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by eric_B View Post
                The cheaper kits are more like toys than musical instruments. The people around here are either (semi-) pro or enthusiastic hobby players. They want quality products and not toys. Moreover, this site is Roland orientated. Therefore these reactions were to be expected.
                Fair point, but I've heard similar reviews of the HD-1 (the Roland practice rig) - and that's more expensive than the Millenium stuff.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by weirdbeardmt View Post
                  Fair point, but I've heard similar reviews of the HD-1 (the Roland practice rig) - and that's more expensive than the Millenium stuff.
                  Yes. And, not wanting to step on anyone's toes, that's why most people here go for a higher TD model. It's really too bad you cannot try the difference for yourself.

                  I can only stress that going cheap isn't the way to go, especially if you already know you like drumming. I wanted to spend a max of EUR 1000 when I bought my kit in April this year, because I never played drums and didn't know if I would stick to it. I ended up buying the TD-9KX and it costed me EUR 2200 including throne, amp, etc. Never regretted it for one moment. Buying a cheaper kit I probably would have.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I dunno -- my buddy bought a cheap Aeon kit (or some name like that) and used it for a while, practicing and even recording songs. Mind now, he hated it -- but it still let him record at home in his apartment. After about 9 months he ended up giving it to his brother and buying a Roland TD-6 kit. The "footswitch for a kick drum" especially drove him nuts, iirc. He had it set up to kind of do double bass somehow...

                    Anyway, I tried his kit at the store too, and it sucked. Yep, very "toy-like". And yet, just from its true kit-like setup, better than the Yamaha DD-55 all-in-one drum pad thingy I was originally planning to buy so as to drum my own beats into my computer DAW.

                    So, it depends how low your initial needs are, I'd say.

                    In some ways, the better the drummer you are (and the greater your access to an acoustic kit), the lesser your needs may be for electronic kit features (if it is to be mainly used as a practice pad or MIDI input device).

                    Myself, I'm getting a lot of use out of my Roland TD-3 based kit with an extra crash and upgraded mesh heads all around. I'm currently thinking about upgrading the module to a TD-12, but if I had regular access to an acoustic kit, that definitely wouldn't be neccessary (in fact, I might be happy with just the Roland entry level module/kit if I could regularly/pretty conveniently use and record with a nice acoustic kit). A lot of people get by with just a practice pad when they can't use a full acoustic drum kit. Some survive with pencils tapping out beats on phone books and pillows...

                    For me, I don't really have regular access to an acoustic kit, and I usually end up doing most of my drumming late at night in my apartment, so electronic is the only way to go. After screwing up with an Alesis kit, I've found a measure of happiness with my Roland kit (as I described it above).

                    Good luck!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I had the Alesis Ion, if that is the one your buddy had...just good enough to prove to myself that this is what i wanted to do, but so badly made that it started to fall apart after a month...the Roland is so much sturdier, holds value better if you need to sell (to buy a bigger kit!), has better sounds and features...I also went looking for somthing like that Yammie, and ended up with a proper kit...
                      TD9+6v with Diamond Electronic pads, and cowbell.
                      ATH-50m headphones, VEX packs
                      not to mention keyboards, guitars, basses, and cats

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Saku, yeah, I think it was called an Ion -- not labeled as "Alesis" here in Korea, but the module was clearly Alesis SR16-based.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by dmt View Post
                          Saku, yeah, I think it was called an Ion -- not labeled as "Alesis" here in Korea, but the module was clearly Alesis SR16-based.
                          yes, that was the one, it had the sr 16 brain..but the trigger i/o kept burning out the brain, they replaced mine three times and then gave me a good deal on a roland...the shop was knee deep in other customers also replacing their brains, er, i mean the brains of their drums, er, you know, they eventually gave up selling it....
                          TD9+6v with Diamond Electronic pads, and cowbell.
                          ATH-50m headphones, VEX packs
                          not to mention keyboards, guitars, basses, and cats

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Also, the benefit of a TD-3 and higher model is that you can expand or upgrade when you're ready for it. When you outgrow a cheap entry kit most times you have to buy a complete other (better) kit.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by eric_B View Post
                              Also, the benefit of a TD-3 and higher model is that you can expand or upgrade when you're ready for it. When you outgrow a cheap entry kit most times you have to buy a complete other (better) kit.
                              Agreed...that is the big problem with the HD-1 - you cant expand it, so you have to get a new kit....
                              TD9+6v with Diamond Electronic pads, and cowbell.
                              ATH-50m headphones, VEX packs
                              not to mention keyboards, guitars, basses, and cats

                              Comment

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