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Drumband and sheetmusic

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  • Drumband and sheetmusic

    Hi all

    I hope this is the right forum for my question(s).

    First, I'm just wondering who of all you plays or used to play in a drumband. Just with snares, tenors and bassdrum? Are there the "toms" in your band? Is it pure rhythmic, or also melodic (some kind of mallet percussion)? Do you have experience with backsticking, stick tricks etc.

    Any ideas where to buy sheet music for drumband? Or a place where you can hear how some marches sound etc.?

    Last one, for the moment... Is there a reason why one wouldn't use a normal snare in a drumband instead of those "special" snares? What is so typical about them, apart from a head that is really tensioned?

    Thanks!


    Stijn
    'lectric drumma
    Roland TD-20, Hart Dynamics 7.6, 2 x PD-7, extra PD-7 and Hart Snare laying around, Vic Firth Dave Weckl signature sticks, Axis A-longboards double pedal, Sony MDR-CD780 headphones and not enough inputs.

  • #2
    By "drumband" do you mean like a marching band drumline or drum corps that performs minus the rest of the band? It's common for drum corps to perform and compete separately from the full band.

    If so, then yes, been there and done that. I marched snare and multi-drums (aka tenors - the equivalent to toms in a marching unit). When we competed without the band, we included our "pit" crew which included mallet percussion as well. And, yes, we had some stick tricks and backsticking to spice things up.

    Sheet music can be had from most major sheet music outlets. Here in the states, I've used SheetMusicPlus.com to buy piano music for my wife. They offer marching percussion music as well. I was pleased with their service. However, when I was competing, our drum books were usually original pieces crafted for us by an instructor or an arranger.

    The difference between marching snares and traditional snares is that marching snares are much larger with deeper shells and thicker snare wires. The result is a much louder drum, which is necessary for outdoor performance, especially when you have a few hundred of your closest friends belting it out with the brass.

    Hope this helps.
    Last edited by V(ader)DRUMMER; 08-06-08, 04:43 PM.
    >>>See my E-kit here<<<

    >>>See my A-kit here<<<

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    • #3
      Thanks for the reply. I am indeed refering to a marching band/drumcorps that performs minus the rest of the band. My reason for asking is that I'm playing in one, well... playing... In our fanfare we have a drum corps in which a few musicians of the fanfare play as well, including me. That means that when we are marching, the fanfare members that play in the drum corps are in the drum corps, except me, since I am playing snare in the fanfare itself. The original idea was that the drumcorps plays in between fanfare marches, giving the fanfare the time to take another march in the marchbook, without there being a silence in between. On normal, non-marching gigs, we can e.g. play some music with the fanfare, followed by some drumcorps marches/pieces. In those situations, there is time enought to leave your fanfare instrument and take your snare.

      So you did play with brass instruments at the same time as well? We only have a few marches in which the fanfare as well as the drum corps play. Bizar though, the fanfare is about 60 musicians, which is really a lot where I live, and the drum corps is about 20 (2 basses, the ones you throw your stick over the top of the drum, don't know what they are called in English), 1 or 2 tenors and the rest is snares (wires on and off). Seems we are loud enough to get over the brass.


      Stijn
      'lectric drumma
      Roland TD-20, Hart Dynamics 7.6, 2 x PD-7, extra PD-7 and Hart Snare laying around, Vic Firth Dave Weckl signature sticks, Axis A-longboards double pedal, Sony MDR-CD780 headphones and not enough inputs.

      Comment


      • #4
        If you have never seen the Hip Pickles, they are really good. I've seen them a handful of times, and am always impressed. Usually there's 2 or more snares, but in this performance at the Modern Drummer Festival, there's only one:
        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kxgmIm_SgC8

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        • #5
          No, never seen 'em, never heard of 'em. I do know these guys: http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=a7ea-G1dCzQ

          Small question, for the ones playing in some "street band" like a fanfare "brassmusicians and percussion". Do you play on a regular snare, on on a marching snare? In my case, I'm just playing a regular aluminium snare with a hook, so I can attach it to my belt. Yeah yeah, you can all start laughing, I'm still using a white belt over my right shoulder...


          Stijn
          'lectric drumma
          Roland TD-20, Hart Dynamics 7.6, 2 x PD-7, extra PD-7 and Hart Snare laying around, Vic Firth Dave Weckl signature sticks, Axis A-longboards double pedal, Sony MDR-CD780 headphones and not enough inputs.

          Comment

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