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New kid on the block

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  • New kid on the block

    Hi All

    Hope you are all well.
    I am new to this site and new to drumming. I play guitar as a hobby but have been getting very interested in drumming. I have been playing for hours on my friends kit and I love it. I feel more alive than with playing guitar.

    So you guess where this is going. I want to get drums, I live in a apartment, i have spare room to use and noise issues. I will be going for lessons.

    So I have two choices.
    Get an acoustic set, rent a room in factory or something and travel to play or practise.

    Or get electronic kit and use the spare room.

    I like the idea of getting an electronic kit because I can play when I want with no noise issues. I also play around on pro tools for fun.

    So here is some of my concerns/quistions.
    Can you get drum lessions when you only play electronic kit?
    Does electronic drum output formats work with pro tools?
    Is it better to play on a acoustic set before you learn electronic drums (because of functions and complications)?
    I dont have a huge amount of money to spend so I was thinking the TD9kx or TD12. I would love to get the TD 20. Both the TD9 and 12 have 8" toms. Is it hard to learn drums on such small toms. What is the general thought on this forum around the small size of toms on these modules?
    How easy is it to transport these drums to a different countree. Does it come with a carry bag ect?
    Am I going to be more confused with all the settings on these modules or will it help me to learn?
    If you get better at drums playing electronic kits, what is the view of using these kits to play live, what does other musies think of drummers using electronic kits?

    I know it is alot of questions, but I want to make the right choice... Sorry for the spelling, english is my seccond language. Any help is apreaceated.
    sigpic

    Roland TD12KV - Vex Master Pics
    Incl-PD125 snare
    M-Audio Pro Firewire 610
    Apple Macbook Pro - Logic Studio

    Kit Pics
    http://s410.photobucket.com/albums/p...6122008076.jpg

  • #2
    bump ..................
    sigpic

    Roland TD12KV - Vex Master Pics
    Incl-PD125 snare
    M-Audio Pro Firewire 610
    Apple Macbook Pro - Logic Studio

    Kit Pics
    http://s410.photobucket.com/albums/p...6122008076.jpg

    Comment


    • #3
      Welcome! Sorry, I was going to respond earlier, but figured there were others more qualified to answer some of your questions...

      You can get lessons when you have only an electronic kit. In fact, I've seen some stores that have a Roland electric kit specifically for lessons. So it is possible.

      The other questions I'll leave for others.

      Comment


      • #4
        Personally, I think it is beneficial to learn the acoustics first because it is harder to play on IMO. However, if you plan on only playing e-kits, then it doesn't matter much. Also, if you learn to play on an e-kit first, I assume that it is merely a matter of adapting to the a-kit. I don't think it is a major disaster to start on the e-kit, but I can't be sure since I started on the a-kit.

        Both TD9 and TD12 are great kits. It really depends on your budget. I am a fairly new e-drummer and have found that the small tom size is a huge advantage for me because it forces me to be more accurate. What I mean is that on my a-kit, the toms are so big that I have grown used to hit all over the place. That's a very bad habit ... I found that I had to actually shape up and be more accurate, so in that respect, I might even be satisfied with even smaller pads.

        Flight cases and the like must either be built by you or purchased separately as I don't think the drums come with them. Of course, maybe some drum store has such an offer, but generally, you need to get those separately.

        With respect to playing live, I have yet to try it, so I can't help you there, but I know that people feel differently about these issues. I am sure most drummers here would not hesitate to play live with an e-kit, but other musicians may be skeptical. THAT is hopefully just a matter of time before they realize just how good the e-kits are today.

        I hope this helps you somewhat.
        Ask not whether something is useful -- ask what it is useful for.

        Roland TD-12, Iron Cobra hihat stand and bass-drum pedal from TAMA. My accoustic kit is a Yamaha Power-V Birch with Paiste Alpha-series splashes, crashes, and hihat. My ride is a Zildjan Ping Ride, 20" I think.

        Check out my TD-12 on Youtube. My page is here http://www.youtube.com/HerlPearl.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Jakes242 View Post
          Is it better to play on a acoustic set before you learn electronic drums (because of functions and complications)?
          Originally posted by Jakes242 View Post
          I dont have a huge amount of money to spend so I was thinking the TD9kx or TD12. I would love to get the TD 20. Both the TD9 and 12 have 8" toms. Is it hard to learn drums on such small toms. What is the general thought on this forum around the small size of toms on these modules?
          I find mesh heads and a good sounding module most important. I was used to bigger toms when I bought my TD-12 kit, but the step to smaller sizes was no problem. Both TD-9KX and TD-12 are very good kits. Can you afford it, go for the TD-20. Or just the TD-20 module and add smaller/cheaper pads.
          Originally posted by Jakes242 View Post
          How easy is it to transport these drums to a different countree. Does it come with a carry bag ect?
          www.drum-tec.de for cases, for example.
          Originally posted by Jakes242 View Post
          Am I going to be more confused with all the settings on these modules or will it help me to learn?
          2Box DrumIt Five, TDW-20BK , additional Kit Toys & Roland cymbals, 2Box, Pearl and Sonor pedals

          Comment


          • #6
            thanks a mill for all your comments. It has helped me alot.

            One last question.
            Is it worth wile to get the PM30 or is the PM10 good enough.
            I have also seen Yamaha kit that is alot cheaper. What would you suggest is a the best cheaper monitor to get.

            I think I am going to go with the Roland TD12 KV. I know the TD9 has a better learning module, but I am going for lessons anyways.

            I love the fact that you can integrate drums with your pc without having to buy alot other gear. I also figured that I will most likely play for at least 2 - 3 years before I can join a band. So I might be out of the apartment by then.....

            Again thanks
            sigpic

            Roland TD12KV - Vex Master Pics
            Incl-PD125 snare
            M-Audio Pro Firewire 610
            Apple Macbook Pro - Logic Studio

            Kit Pics
            http://s410.photobucket.com/albums/p...6122008076.jpg

            Comment


            • #7
              Hi Jake.

              Thought I would put in some of my advice, that may or may not be shared by others. If you are learning getting a TD12 is a fantastic option. This module will give you most of the options of a TD20 and using addons you can get the same sounds. I started lessons when I was 12 and now I am 47. I did most of my learning on a practice pad that's smaller than the pads on the TD12. Most learning is done this way so you get the basic fundimentals. When I started thier was only one choice A-Kits, but If it had been now I would choose a E-Kit hands down. I use my kit for live playing with great results, In fact I have every kit in the drum store when I play, all at the turn of a knob. I don't damage my back moving it around and I don't upset anyone when I am playing at home. I love connecting it to my computer and recording my own music and drum fills. I can even get the software to print the music score..

              I am not saying that their is anything wrong with using or learning on an A-Kit. I am just pointing out that you are making a good choice for your situation. The Electronic Kit is not an Accustic Kit in any way. I't a whole different and more versitile instrament.

              Best Regards
              Mardy

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Jakes242 View Post
                One last question.
                Is it worth wile to get the PM30 or is the PM10 good enough.
                I have also seen Yamaha kit that is alot cheaper. What would you suggest is a the best cheaper monitor to get.
                Some say the Roland monitors are a bit pricey for what you get. For about the same price of a PM10 I got a Simmons DA200S from Guitar Center. If you have one nearby, go take a look and compare for yourself.

                Comment


                • #9
                  ...the TD9kx or TD12. I would love to get the TD 20. Both the TD9 and 12 have 8" toms. Is it hard to learn drums on such small toms. What is the general thought on this forum around the small size of toms on these modules?
                  My kit has acoustic shells converted to E's. There is an 8" "real" tom as well as a 10, 12 and 14". So what is this talk about the TD-9 and 12 having 8" toms? It's no harder than "real drums".
                  Kit Pic 1 Kit Pic 2 Kit Pic 3... And FOR SALE I have: 3 PD-9's, MDS-10 purple rack w/cables/pad and cym mounts. See classified posts for details or PM me.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hi boingo.

                    No it's the other way around.. I think you might have got a bit mixed up on this one. Some people say that it is easyer to play E-Drums, not the other way around. In some cases I think this is a little true as you can place toms alot closer to each other and this allows you to do things that are a little harder to do on A-Drums (due to size and mounting options). I think the most important thing is to do what feels cool for each person. The point of the thread was to advise the new guy on whats best to learn on. I think both are as good as each other, they are just different. Hell I learn't on A-Drum's and now I have E-Drums, My drums are closer together and I can do some faster transitions. However I am still the same old ave drummer I always was and will be

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hi BW

                      Me mixed up? Say it ain't so! I only wanted to address one narrow aspect of his post and avoid a long one like this. I don't think we disagree much. Here's what I think...

                      Perhaps I took his statement the wrong way but when he mentioned the TD-9 & 12, he asked "What is the general thought on this forum around the small size of toms on these modules" and "Is it hard to learn drums on such small toms". I took it to mean these small drums were an E-drum phenomenon (especially on lower priced kits).

                      When I bought my current kit, it dawned on me there were 8" toms on "real" drum kits and my prior snob view on the small V-drums was off base. A drum is a drum, they come in different sizes and you just learn to play them regardless of size. And don't worry about hard or easy. It's irrelevant. Probably nit-picking but that's what we do in many of these posts.

                      Is it harder to hit a smaller target? Probably nit-picking there too. 8" really isn't that small. Heck, when you first start learning to play, I'm sure there are several 12" drums being missed or hit close to or on the rim unintentionally.
                      ___

                      Ref his other questions:

                      I think some drum instructors would prefer you learn on A's but most won't mind E's.

                      E's work with Pro tools.

                      It's better to play on A's first. Better muscle development. More variations from A's due to dynamics.

                      TD-9 and 12 are great sounding kits and darn good starter kits. Not everyone needs or wants a TD-20.

                      It's no big deal to learn on smaller toms - certainly not enough to be concerned with.

                      Transporting to another country - I assume it is as much a pain as with any drum kit but possibly cheaper since more compact and lighter. Bags are optional.

                      Confused with settings - probably a little, but it will help you understand things like EQ, ambience, compression, etc depending on what module you get. Assumes you will be gigging out and want to be involved in selecting your sound. Need to be careful of tweaking taking away from playing time. Wouldn't get too involved with it in the beginning.

                      Playing live - drummers and the drummer wanna-be's will give you dirty looks. The audience won't give a crap 2 minutes after they hear how good the sound is. Unless you are Dave Weckl or similar, they didn't come there just to stare at you. Truthfully, A's (and some converted E's) will always outshine a stock E-kit. They just look marvelous. Can't deny that.

                      By the way, love the avatar. I have that picture hanging in my office.
                      Kit Pic 1 Kit Pic 2 Kit Pic 3... And FOR SALE I have: 3 PD-9's, MDS-10 purple rack w/cables/pad and cym mounts. See classified posts for details or PM me.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I'm with ya. Just took the time to look at the pictures of your kit.. Job well done it looks great. It reminded me just how small the pd9 pads were on my old E-Kit.. Love the look of a full kit for sure. But the small car won't allow it. After saying that when I do a gig and have to take my own amps and stuff, I think I carry more that I used to when I had an A-Kit.. Now I have the worry if any of it stops working... Oh but it's all worth the worry. I love my
                        E-Drums and they don't answer me back... Better than a wife

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          TD 9 is great for a starter kit, as is in fact all the TDs now available on the second hand market...not everyone, as has been said, needs the features of the 12 or 20 when they start out, and things can always be upgraded if you find you are staying with the hobby...not everyone who starts sticks it out to the level where you need a 20....

                          re carrying it: These things arent lightweight and break down into two or more big boxes, you cant pop it in a carry bag and sling it over your shoulder...so its not like you can take it with you on your summer holiday to mallorca or what not...for that you need one of the RMP practice pads - or a hand drum like the hpd 10.
                          TD9+6v with Diamond Electronic pads, and cowbell.
                          ATH-50m headphones, VEX packs
                          not to mention keyboards, guitars, basses, and cats

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Thanks ALL

                            Hi All

                            Thanks for all your comments. I think I will go with the TD12. I guess you are right about the toms. Don't get me wrong. I would prefer to get a A-kit, but I live in the city and a I would have to rent a room for that. My friend back in SA is a drummer wizz and he always stuck with A-kits.

                            But I like more the idea of instant digital recording.

                            Do you think it is worth while to get a new one I can get a seccond hand one for much cheaper. around 700 euro less. Does Roland give you warrenty or is it the shop. How long would the pads last.

                            Againd thanks

                            By the way, Boingo your kit is the sh"t
                            sigpic

                            Roland TD12KV - Vex Master Pics
                            Incl-PD125 snare
                            M-Audio Pro Firewire 610
                            Apple Macbook Pro - Logic Studio

                            Kit Pics
                            http://s410.photobucket.com/albums/p...6122008076.jpg

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Hi Jake.

                              If you can afford a new one I would go for that. However if you can get a second hand unit at a good price that could also be good. What I do is think about what could go wrong and what that would cost to get fixed and then consider that when purchasing second hand. You need to be purchasing it at a really good price to cover this and the fact that it's not new.

                              Don't worry about the pad life. I own a TD12 Kit with the mesh pads and they get the Cr-p hit out of them most nights. They show no evidence of wear at all. Before that I had Roland rubber pads on an Alisis Kit for over 15 years and never replaced anything. Roland make good gear and the TD12 is not a toy. You will find it will give you many hours of pleasure. No tuning problems, no noise problems, and now I am finding it great fun to show those who have no idea what these things can do.



                              Good Choice
                              Mardy

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