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New but Pro level user needs help picking a module

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  • New but Pro level user needs help picking a module

    Hi all-

    I need some advice and/or recommendations. I am a full on acoustic player looking to record at home with an electronic kit. No Live use at all, I've got Bradys and Ludwigs for that. I don't expect to be using any on board sounds from the module unless I get an outrageous deal on a TD 20. I'm just not that impressed and would rather spend my cash on samples

    I will most likely be adding to my MPC sample library with Tooktraks or Ocean Way drums and triggering them MIDI to Logic on a Mac. And I expect to get some Hart pads, even though the roland mesh is not so bad.

    Here's the question...

    Is there any significant difference between the MIDI capabilities of the new and older ROLAND units? Can all my layering be done on the computer and not in the unit? Tha's all it seems I need the module for, to act as an interface.

    Thanks in advance to the replies..

  • #2
    I'm not an expert AT ALL on this stuff...but it seems to me that a lot of people have talked about using the Alesis I/O and not even bothering with a module if you're just communicating with your computer. I guess the thought being that a module is just becomes an overpriced MIDI interface if that's the only thing you're using it for.
    Stick twirling - because you obviously have mastered all other aspects of drumming already, right?

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    • #3
      The Alesis I/O has numerous limitations in terms of what hardware it'll work well with. I haven't followed those threads that closely but I'd read up on em here and over at edrumming before I'd take the plunge. I just remember Joe K going thru all kinds of motions to get the I/O to work in certain situations with certain hardware. Perhaps those problems have been fixed or easy workarounds found.

      There is some differences in older and newer modules mainly on the cymbal side. The offset features for the HH and interval control for the cymbals are the most notable and probably the most desirous to have. That being said, you can use Loop Be and Chaotic Box software to remap the MIDI and dial in your HH so that you don't need the offset features. Interval control is a bit harder to duplicate but I've found that not to be as noticeable (at least on EZ Drummer) than on the actual Roland module.

      Two links:
      http://www.vdrums.com/forum/showthread.php?t=36001

      http://www.vdrums.com/forum/showthread.php?t=35673

      Thus, if all that works for you, yeah, you don't need to go overboard on a module. For that matter, you could possibly get by with something as old as a TD-7 which would bring the cost way down.
      TD-12, DTX502, SD1000, EZDrummer, Diamond Drum 12" snare, S1000 toms/cymbals/kick, PCY10/100/135/155, CY-5/14, Hart Ride, Hart Acupad 8" kick, Epedal Pro II, Concept 1 pads/cymbals, SD1000 & Roland V Sessions racks, PD-7, Kit Toy 10" splash, DMPad ride, SamplePad, PerformancePad Pro

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      • #4
        Originally posted by grog View Post
        For that matter, you could possibly get by with something as old as a TD-7 which would bring the cost way down.
        I would like to take that statement a little further. A lot (not all) of people believe that in order to you use a multi-zone trigger you need a module with a multi-zone input. This is not always the case. Multiple zones for an edrum kit can easily be accomplished with multiple single trigger inputs. What I mean by that is, that if you are planning on using a computer for the sounds (which you indicated) you could use multiple Alesis D4's or DM5's (or Roland TD-7's or PM-16's for that matter). So if you have a 3-zone ride (setup being: piezo,piezo,piezo) you would just plug the output of that ride cymbal to three single trigger inputs. Set the midi notes on the device you are using as your drum to midi interface so the computer will trigger it correctly, and away you go.

        If you run out of trigger inputs from a single device (i.e.. D4, DM5, TD-7, or PM-16) just add another device to the midi chain. The biggest advantage to setting up your edrums this way, is you get the greatest possible control over the kit. You would never be limited by the number of inputs on a given module. I will say that setting up you kit this way is not exactly for the faint of hart, but if you do not plan on moving the drum set, once you get it the way you want, your done! If you ever plan on playing out with an edrum set, I would not recommend this type of set-up.
        alesisDRUMMER.com

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        • #5
          The offset features for the HH
          Hey Grog, what is the offset feature?

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          • #6
            It allows you to really dial in the foot splash and foot chic. I only know about it based on the stuff that came with my Hart Epedal II Pro. My exp TD10 doesn't have this nor does it have interval control, the two main features that would ever lure me into a 12/20 module.

            www.myspace.com/rubberuniverse
            TD-12, DTX502, SD1000, EZDrummer, Diamond Drum 12" snare, S1000 toms/cymbals/kick, PCY10/100/135/155, CY-5/14, Hart Ride, Hart Acupad 8" kick, Epedal Pro II, Concept 1 pads/cymbals, SD1000 & Roland V Sessions racks, PD-7, Kit Toy 10" splash, DMPad ride, SamplePad, PerformancePad Pro

            Comment

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