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  • R27789
    replied
    Hi all,
    I agree with the hot spots theory..
    Certainly I've seen the velocity spikes when hitting the centre as anyone here has.

    However, I'd like to suggest one more reason which MAY(i said "may", so please don't shoot me) be why we see the strange velocity jumps.

    My company been testing microchips for many years and our chips have an inbuilt 8 bit A/D circuitry.(0-255 levels or 00 to FF) Do you know how many of our chips fail the A/D test because of "Noise spikes"? (Voltage noises, not audio noise) When we retest the chips, they would mostly pass A/D test. When we checked, the analog voltage which should correspond with say, for eg, a "80" value would give us a digital result high as "8F" sometimes.(Very far from accurate) This is because of the noise. Our chips are tested at 2-4mhz, and any capacitance/resistance due to poor or variable contact or any external voltage source, would cause an additional voltage spike in there. If say the Reference voltage is 5V(=FF value), then 5/255 would in the order of 20mV per digital step. Very small value, and the accuracy is easily interruptable by voltage noise. (and please don't buy the +/- tolerance seen on the Specifications of whatever chips you get. Nothing escapes from noise)

    Just to throw in some ideas in here.. you can see I am no MIDI expert, but I do know how the A/D works... Please feel free to correct me for the musical application, we all know bits and pieces of the whole puzzle anyway...
    (And you can see why I'd like to work for an Edrum company.... )

    In simple terms, I was just wondering about those strange velocity spikes I get when NOT hitting in the centre of the pad.


    Leave a comment:


  • rudi-mint
    replied
    Bweir96: edrums are very different than acoustics, and playing them should be approached differently. It take some time, an open mind, and a whole lot of tweaking before you get used to these things. I started playin edrums after a few years away from my acoustics so the transition was not that difficult for me. Now that I have played with the edrums I love them and although I still own acoustics I do not see myself playing them for live situations.

    My edrums don't exactly feel like acoustics, and they don't sound exactly like acoustics either, but they sound and feel good, and for me, they have many advantages over acoustics. Instruments are just tools. The music comes from you.


    Kurt

    Leave a comment:


  • Marc.
    replied
    Originally posted by feefer:
    ... but I'm more concerned with latency, i.e. timing issues than velocity levels ...
    As should every drummer. After all, we are the time-keepers. Can't have the machines falling behind.

    -------------------
    -~

    Leave a comment:


  • MPCman
    replied
    Hi Bweir96,

    you should certainly check out the ddrum4 set too. It has 1000 steps of velocity when played via pads and you can download very good sounds from the internet and dump them into the ddrum4 brain.

    The ddrum pads are a bit noisier then the Rolands, there are no internal effects or sequencer which the V-drums do have.
    Check out as much e-drum kits as possible and see what suits you best.

    greetings,
    Pieter

    Leave a comment:


  • Pleiadian
    replied
    Originally posted by acidbran:
    My question is : How do I set the sensitivity so that I can get the best natural feel and be soft and make the loudest point seem more like an acoustic set?
    Jeff
    Jeff,

    I don't know if this is the easiest and/or preferred method, but here it goes.
    I assume that your TD8 is midi connected to a PC (Hmmm... is this a reasonable assumption?):
    • Download Midi-OX from http://www.midiox.com
    • Start Midi-OX and hit a pad.
    • if everything is configured ok, Midi-OX displays the Midi info from your TD8.(You might want to right click the main window, and select "Display Decimal" if you're not into hexadecimal numbers)
    • Watch for the line that ends with "Note On". The value under Data2 is how "hard" the note sounds. Ideally you want the value for the softest note to be as close to zero as possible and the value for the loudest hit to be 127. Everything else should be evenly distributed between 0 and 127. This will give you optimum dynamics.
    • Now, on your TD8 go to Setup -> Trig -> Basic. Fiddle with the sensitivity, threshold, curve and rim sensitivity. Use Midi-OX to get feedback.


    Oh, yeah... be sure to make a backup of your TD8 first. Soon, you'll be able to use my program TD-M8 for this (plug,plug!) which will be realeased shortly. In the meantime you can use MIDI-OX for this.

    Rob

    Leave a comment:


  • Pleiadian
    replied
    This is the technical forum!

    Leave a comment:


  • acidbran
    replied
    My head reels.....
    I...I...I, just wanna play drums...

    My question is : How do I set the sensitivity so that I can get the best natural feel and be soft and make the loudest point seem more like an acoustic set?
    I just bought a td 8 and have pintech mesh pads.
    I am a tweaking fool right now. thanks in advance.
    Jeff

    ------------------
    Doh !!

    Leave a comment:


  • bweir96
    replied
    man its funny how i started this post with asking for advice for a beginner and it turned into advanced technical jargon. lol. anyways. jargon away......

    Leave a comment:


  • Pleiadian
    replied
    Originally posted by BINARY:
    I'm not sure that makes any sense at all.

    127 would be

    011111111

    You can't leave off a digit, because all 8 digits define the numerical equivelant.

    I'm also fairly certain that 127 is 7E in Hex, not 7F.

    I don't mean to sound like a nerd, but...

    you can leave off a digit, as long as it are zeros. Just as 0127 means the same as 127 in decimal numbers, 01111111 is equal to 1111111 in binary numbers.

    7F (Hex) is equal to 1111111 (Binary) is equal to 127 (Decimal)

    Leave a comment:


  • R27789
    replied
    Binary,
    I was saying, that velocity levels are NOT using special binary code, but straight forward 1 - > 127 from softest to loudest..
    The TD7 has a setting to change the velocity meter display between the bar type and the number type and the number does increase proportionately with velocity. 1-127 levels.

    Your quote: (You don't think...)
    "first seven digits of the 8 digit binary code and have every possible permutation equate to a specific velocity level."

    So if they don't do the above, how do they do it then? But my guess is that it's not in code, but a direct straight forward representation. From 00000000 to 01111111
    same as from 0 to 127.

    Anyway, the point is, as Putt pointed out, the limitations in the velocity sensitivity we hear.

    Fon

    Leave a comment:


  • puttenvr
    replied
    As MPCman once wrote: it's not important that there are 127 steps of dynamics, it's important how these steps are subdivided.

    On most e-drums the dynamics are great as far as the soft parts of playing are concerned. From a certain point every thing is at the same volume level. You just can't get louder. This should be done better.

    Leave a comment:


  • BINARY
    replied
    Of couse they're using Microchips for the units, but I don't think the MIDI setup works the way you imply.

    Velocity levels in a special code?
    Yeah, but it's not like they decided to use the first seven digits of the 8 digit binary code and have every possible permutation equate to a specific velocity level.

    Correctomundo, BINARY is spelled out using the binary representation of ASCII characters.

    BINARY

    Leave a comment:


  • R27789
    replied
    Hi again Binary,
    Roland or any other Module still uses Microchips using CPU, A/D, etc.
    I am a Product Engr, and our dept tests Microcontrollers(Processors), with 16bit arithmetic registers, with CPU, RAM, EPROM, EEPROM, 8 bit A/D, etc. I.e. HC11's.

    While the code you used(ASCII??) to write your name "BINARY" is using the special code unique for each character,(or the code used for MIDI note numbers) it doesn't make sense
    to represent Velocity levels in a special code? Hmm.. how I wish I could work for Roland corporation..

    Any new hires needed??

    Fon.

    Leave a comment:


  • BINARY
    replied
    I'm not sure that makes any sense at all.

    127 would be

    011111111

    You can't leave off a digit, because all 8 digits define the numerical equivelant.

    That said, MIDI note numbers don't correspond to binary digits the way you describe - in Roland's world or anyone else's.

    I'm also fairly certain that 127 is 7E in Hex, not 7F.

    01000010 B
    01001001 I
    01001110 N
    01000001 A
    01010010 R
    01011001 Y




    Leave a comment:


  • R27789
    replied
    To add to Putt's comments, I always thought(and just confirmed it) that the 127 levels of MIDI dynamics on the V drums is a limitation on the e-drums. Did anyone ever wonder why 127??
    It corresponds with the HEX number of 7F, right in the middle of the maximum 16 bit number of FF. (hmm just checked, 127 is also
    1111111 in binary, so dynamics levels from 7 digit binary?? Strange.. Anyone knows why??)

    Anyway, I think 127 is still not enough as I can hear the dynamics "jump" between one level to the next. Thus making the unrealistic feel described by Putt and Bweir96.

    However, to answer Bweir's questions, I for one, also feel the same as you about edrums, regarding feel and realism , but I would still get them. (I have) But you need to get used to it, same way as a pianist shifting to an electronic piano somewhat)

    Fon.


    Leave a comment:

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