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Which cymbals should I get for TD8?

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  • Which cymbals should I get for TD8?

    I have read many cymbal posts, but most have been from folks with TD10. I have TD8 and currently have Hart ECymbal X for all the cymbals. I am thinking of replacing for technical and noise reasons.

    Here are my goals:

    1) I have never gotten the Hart ride 100% right. I have tried splitting between two inputs without much luck and ended up using the dual trigger Aux input with decent results. I still, however, sometimes get bell noises when playing the bow. It just bugs me and would like something that works correctly all (95%+) the time.

    2) My crashes sometimes choke if I strike them too hard.

    3) I want a quieter ride and hi-hat.

    So I believe my only option for quieter is the new Roland CY series. Given that, I have a few questions.

    -I know I can't do three zone with the ride with a TD8, but I am happy with dual zone as long as the bell and bow trigger approprately and don't cross-talk. Have folks had problems with ride bell/bow crosstalk on CY-15R with TD8?

    -How do folks like the CY-12H hi-hat with TD8?

    -Should I forget the expensive Roland cymbals and just get CY-6 cymbals for hi-hat, ride, and crashes? Are they quiet and do they work well with the TD8?

    -Do folks like the Roland CY cymblas better than the Hart ECymbal X series in terms of triggering stability with the TD8?

    Sorry for the long post. Very interested in all opinions.

    Thanks!
    -Hart Studio B w/TD8

  • #2
    Originally posted by crackie:
    -I know I can't do three zone with the ride with a TD8

    -Should I forget the expensive Roland cymbals and just get CY-6 cymbals for hi-hat, ride, and crashes? Are they quiet and do they work well with the TD8?

    -Do folks like the Roland CY cymblas better than the Hart ECymbal X series in terms of triggering stability with the TD8?
    crackie -

    welcome aboard. i actually grew up in los gatos (lghs alumnus). my parents still live there.

    1. you can actually have three ride zone with the td-8. it will simply require a second input (as it also does on the td-10). you will have bell/bow and edge/bow being triggered by your inputs. turn the bow sound to "off" on one of them and you're in business with a 3 zone ride. there are many people here who use the cy15r with the td8.

    2. there are also many people who use the cy-6. deciding between them is most likely a matter of personal preference. i would say go to guitar center (i think there's one in san jose) and check them out. roland has also recently annonced a new cy-12r/c cymbal. not too much info is available yet, but you can learn a little more here:
    http://www.keyboardshop.com/product....derid=12997146

    3. i have never used the hart cymbals so i have to defer to someone else. there have been a lot of complaints about them recently on the board, though.

    good luck!

    Comment


    • #3
      The CY cymbals will certainly be quieter and you will probably find that they trigger as well or better even with the TD-8. In the meantime, I suspect raising your threshold setting might combat the unintentional choking on hard hits.

      Comment


      • #4
        I'm using the CY-6's for my 2 crashes. I got used to the pd-7's, but the v-cyms do have a much more natural feel. Haven't tried the CY-12/15/hh, except for a few hits on the store demo. But for the price (about $80 each shipped) the CY-6's are a great deal. You can still use a leftover pd-7 or 2 as extra percussion pads.

        I still use a pd-7 for my hhbecause it has a good feel. One thing to consider for a ride is the Yamaha PCY-80S, about $75. It is the pizza-slice-shaped pad, slightly flexible, and very quiet. It works great as a ride and triggers excellently with no crosstalk. The only adaptation needed is to put the bell on the rim trigger, so hitting with the shank of the stick produces bell sounds. The bow pad area has just enough give to feel like a ride cymbal. You might like the PCY-80S as a hihat as well. It is not bad at all, being much quieter and more flexible than the PD-7's.

        Comment


        • #5
          Whine, whine, whine…. just like a newbie. I have a good mind to rip jr, but I have said all I can say about Hart and how to use products from other manufacturers with TD’s and get good results, but in this case I won’t – I will only repeat my self again. So go with Roland and pay a s_h_i_t more for your products, which will piss you off as well later on.

          And as far as noise, everyone who plays at home will never be satisfied unless you stick a trigger under you pillow and play with pencils.


          ------------------
          szvook
          Studio

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by szvook:
            And as far as noise, everyone who plays at home will never be satisfied unless you stick a trigger under you pillow and play with pencils
            I never understood the 'I MUST have absolutely silent drums' thing. Drummers hit things. Pretty hard to do that without making noise.
            Some electronic triggers make a louder 'Thwap' or 'phut' noise than others. noise than others. Big deal.
            ....and that's 'phut' not Putt, Putt. I'm sure he knows what I mean
            Steve

            'I only ever quote myself - except when I quote someone else' - me

            , plenty of , and , , triggered acoustics, , and a plethora of PA blah blah freakin blah...I mean does anyone care about the specifics of pedals, speakers, processors, hardware or anything that I'm using?? :confused: Hmmm, maybe this is an appropriate place to mention that I tried out a new cymbal stand the other day...

            Comment


            • #7
              I agree with you, expecially in the home environment. Expecting silent triggers is unreasonable. However, I play at a Church which seats 300 plus. We had a set which used Stinger pads and there were times when I could hear the drummers hitting the pads over the music. The kind of music we played ranged from very soft to almost headbanger. The monitors tend to be a bit lower in this setting which makes it worse. Add to that some particularly heavy hitting drummers and it became distracting. Since we switched to the V's, we rarely have that problem.

              Any pad noise concerns in this kind of environment are reasonable. I would suspect metal cymbals like Harts might present a problem. Unfortunately, we don't have any in my area to try first hand.

              This time next year we should be in our 1000 seat building. We will move up to better FOH, room acoustics and will also include in ear monitors. Can't wait to experience those changes!
              Kit Pic 1 Kit Pic 2 Kit Pic 3... And FOR SALE I have: 3 PD-9's, MDS-10 purple rack w/cables/pad and cym mounts. See classified posts for details or PM me.

              Comment


              • #8
                steve and boingo -

                neither of you guys must live in an apartment. i agree that nothing being struck with a drumstick can really be 100% silent but, for those of us with a psycho lady immediately beneath us in an apartment building, getting them as quiet as possible is a good thing.

                personally, if i could afford to have really noisy e-drums i would just have a-drums.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Brother, I feel your pain. I live in a house with a basement which has concrete walls and floor. When I first got my V's, I got up in the middle of the night and would end up in the basement playing. I look up at there's my wife standing on the basement steps looking at me like I'm nuts. I'd didn't count on the sound of the PD 7's & 9's traveling through the heating ducts and waking her up. So much for playing in the wee hours of the morning. If I were in an apartment, I'd have to add to that the vibrations through the floor/walls/ceilings, etc.

                  This brings up the fact that "silence" has to deal with two issues. You have noise which I experienced as well as vibration which apartment dwellers have to deal with.

                  All I'm saying is that to expect them to be silent on both fronts is a tall order. I don't think the manufacturers (Roland, Yammi, Clavia...) ever meant to imply you would get noise/vibration free playing.

                  There's a big difference when faced with the challenge of quieting a set of A's vs E's. I don't think you'd stand a chance trying to quiet the A's without a huge effort. I think you have a chance at success with the E's.

                  You need to concentrate on dealing with the noise and/or vibration. There have been posts with people using various sound absorbing and dampening materials. Do a search, research some materials on your own and be creative. If you find something that works, share it with the rest of the people on this site. You'll be a hero.
                  Kit Pic 1 Kit Pic 2 Kit Pic 3... And FOR SALE I have: 3 PD-9's, MDS-10 purple rack w/cables/pad and cym mounts. See classified posts for details or PM me.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    i think we're on the same page.

                    i actually already undertook a modest soundproofing project to stop the vibrations from going through my floor. i posted my solution in one of the topics here. it helped but didn't fully solve my vibration problems.

                    what worked in the end the best for me was scheduling. i live above one of those people who complains when you walk through your apartment late at night, and then blasts her music at midnight on a tuesday (i won't comment on her musical taste). we finally agreed that i would quit practicing by 8pm and that would be that.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      How do folks like the CY-12H hi-hat with TD8?

                      In my experience, the CY-12H does not perform adequately with the TD-8 due to response issues, i.e. missed hits when playing fast and/or light. I tried just about every combination of trigger settings and could not resolve the problem. In comparison, the other v-cymbals work perfectly. Some people have reported good results when using the CY-12H with the TD-8, so YMMV.

                      Should I forget the expensive Roland cymbals and just get CY-6 cymbals for hi-hat, ride, and crashes?

                      The CY-6 should perform just as well as the more expensive v-cymbals, and of course with the CY-6 you get more for your money. However, the CY-14/CY-15 look better (IMO) and feel better to play (IMO). If you don't mind spending the extra money, I would say go with the CY-14/CY-15, or perhaps the upcoming 3-zone CY-12, which might just make a good hi-hat itself.

                      Are they quiet and do they work well with the TD8?

                      All the v-cymbals are relatively quiet. Actual stick noise is quieter than a PD-7, but louder than a mesh pad. However, the bell on the CY-15 (which I don't use) is quite loud when you use the shoulder of the stick.
                      Roland TD-20 v1.08, various v-drums and v-cymbals, Yamaha KP65's, Axis pedals, Gibraltar hardware, Mackie 1202/SRM450 (pre-china)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by digitsone:
                        neither of you guys must live in an apartment
                        Ah, point taken. I apologise. Sometimes I forget that I live in the most underpopulated country in the world.
                        Steve

                        'I only ever quote myself - except when I quote someone else' - me

                        , plenty of , and , , triggered acoustics, , and a plethora of PA blah blah freakin blah...I mean does anyone care about the specifics of pedals, speakers, processors, hardware or anything that I'm using?? :confused: Hmmm, maybe this is an appropriate place to mention that I tried out a new cymbal stand the other day...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I'm in the same boat. Apartment, TD8, etc.

                          So, back to the original question: Which pad is the best (and also cheapest)?

                          I'm just looking for a ride that plays bow & bell. I got a CY6, but as I found out it's only bow & edge. I'm thinking about looking into the Hart ride but have never played one. Also I saw another post talking about the 12" Roland ride, which would be great if that price of $124 on the link is correct.

                          What do you guys think?

                          P.S. - the $300 Roland ride is too expensive for me.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Again, I'd recommend the Yamaha PCY-80S. Nice feel and surface, quiet, cheap. (About $60-70.) The rim is raised, so all you need to do is accept that the "bell" is on the rim. Great response as a ride and it plays well. Your other main option (if you insist on a bell in the center!) would be to get a regular single-zone cymbal (like a Hart)and buy the separate bell trigger (from Yamaha?). However, this will take up 2 inputs on the TD-8 (or the Aux 11/12 jack)and will probably be more expensive. Try the PCY-80S. $^)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I have three of the PCY-80S I use for crash/ride/hh and I love them!
                              I'm a drummer. I don't play the timpani! Hire a percussionist!!!

                              Comment

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