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Cymbal Review (long)

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  • Cymbal Review (long)

    Note: This is NOT an expert's opinion, but an unbiased review from somewhat of a newbie to the world of electonic drumming. Enjoy!

    After picking up a Roland V-Pro kit a few months ago, I got the itch to go shopping. I was after the same thing everyone else seems to be after; better electronic cymbals. Sure the PD-9’s that come with the kit trigger just find and sound great, but they just don’t look, feel or react like real cymbals. Since the rest of the kit feels and reacts just like acoustics, the hard rubber pad made the kit feel a little unbalanced to me.

    After a lot of studying and (and advice gained from online forums) I made my decision and picked up the following:<ul>[*]1 Roland V-Cymbals Hi-Hat (CY-12H)</li>[*]1 Translucent Gold Visu-lite China Type (1800C)</li>[*]1 Hart Dynamics Ecymbals II Ride (ECII 16R)</li>[*]2 Hart Dynamics Ecymbals II Crashes (12” & 14” / ECII 12C & ECII 14C)</li>[/list]Roland Hi-Hat

    I picked the hi-hat up at my local Guitar Center (GC). I was pleased to see that their price was as low as any online store I could find. As the first edition to my kit (following the TDW-1 Expansion Board) I was thrilled to get this baby home and plug it in. As usual, the staff at GC was very quick and helpful.

    The Pros

    The primary functionality I was seeking in a new hi-hat was to have a more natural feel that compared to that of striking an acoustic hi-hat with the shank of a drumstick. I am pleased to report that this Roland hi-hat does the trick perfectly. I also received an unexpected benefit. I wasn’t able to get the original hi-hat sitting up high enough for my comfort using the standard mount that came with the kit. Since the CY-12H mounts a little differently (sits on top of the mount), I was able to get it up to a perfect height. The Roland feels very solid. It appears at this point that it should last me many years.

    The Cons

    The price. $245 is a little steep in my opinion. Roland’s high prices on V-Cymbals are a primary reason I’m writing a review of 3 different companies’ products, rather than just theirs. To outfit the entire kit with Roland brand V-Cymbals would have been much more expensive.

    The Verdict

    Highly recommended, if your piggy bank is nice and fat.

    Visu-lite China Type

    I ordered the Visu-lite China directly from visu-lite.com. The service couldn’t have been better. I placed my order using the least expensive shipping method, and the cymbal arrived in 3 days.

    The Pros

    Solid product. Triggers perfectly every time. Fits any cymbal stand. Fantastic price at $69.95!

    The Cons

    It’s made of a very thick, hard plastic (I’m sure they use a fancier name than “thick hard plastic”, but that’s basically what it is). The bottom 1/3 of the cymbal is covered in a very thin rubber. This makes for a very loud cymbal. Much louder than anything I’ve purchased from Roland. Another downside was the color, though I will take all the blame for this. After all, I did have 11 different choices! But I opted for the “translucent gold”, thinking it would be the closest match to an acoustic cymbal. Sorry, not even close. In hindsight, I probably should have picked up an “opaque black” or “opaque white” one. I should also note that the rubber on my cymbal has been coming off since I took it out of the box. It’s only happening on about a 3-inch area, so a little glue should nail it down just fine. I have not yet fixed this, as I’m contemplating swapping the rubber with something a little thicker to dampen the sound.

    The Verdict

    Because of the noise, apartment dwellers may want to think twice before ordering this product. Other than that, I’d say it’s pretty damn cool. It’s the only china type cymbal on the market that I’m aware of. Just don’t try to mimic the look of a true cymbal. Pick a color that matches something else on your kit.

    Hart Dynamics Ecymbals II Ride

    I ordered all three Hart cymbals from sepdrums.com. This process was not as timely as ordering from Visu-lite. The shipping choices were “US Priority Mail” and “UPS Ground”. Knowing that US Priority Mail typically takes 2 days (3 max), I selected this option. It ended up getting shipped via FedEx Ground, and taking over a week to get here. Not a big deal, but I would have liked to know this up front. Despite this issue, I would not hesitate to order from them again. They were very prompt, courteous and helpful when responding to my email inquiries. Something that’s rare in the e-commerce world.

    The Pros

    The Hart Ride is the most realistic electronic cymbal I’ve ever used, hands down. It looks real, feels real, reacts real… It’s even made of metal! The rubber on the bottom third does a descent job of keeping it quiet.

    The Cons

    Setting up dual-triggering to get a separate sound from the body of the ride and the bell is no easy task. The rubber on the body of the ride is fine, but the rubber positioning on the bell is a little awkward for those of us (probably the vast majority of us) who play the bell with the shank of the stick. I find myself hitting the metal part quite often. This is not a big deal, as the metal part triggers the same way. It’s just not as quiet as striking the rubber.

    The Verdict

    If you're an experienced V-drummer, who knows your way around the brain, this is a great cymbal for you.

    Hart Dynamics Ecymbals II Crashes

    RE-RUN: I ordered all three Hart cymbals from sepdrums.com. This process was not as timely as ordering from Visu-lite. The shipping choices were “US Priority Mail” and “UPS Ground”. Knowing that US Priority Mail typically takes 2 days (3 max), I selected this option. It ended up getting shipped via FedEx Ground, and taking over a week to get here. Not a big deal, but I would have liked to know this up front. Despite this issue, I wouldn’t hesitate to order from them again. They were very prompt, courteous and helpful when responding to my email inquiries. Something that’s rare in the e-commerce world.

    The Pros

    These babies look just like acoustic cymbals. They also come in a variety of sizes. I haven’t had them long enough to test their durability, but I’ve been told by other users that they should last for a long, long time. Tech support for Hart products in unrivaled by any other music instrument manufacturer I’ve ever dealt with.

    The Cons

    They do require some pretty precise positioning to get the “choke strip’ in just the right place, so you can grab it on-the-fly. The documentation for both types of Hart cymbals (ride and crash) is skimpy, at best.

    The Verdict

    Out of all the new electronic cymbals I’ve purchased in the past month, the Hart crashes are definitely my favorites. I definitely plan on buying more!

    ------------------
    Drooling Dog

    [This message has been edited by Drooling Dog (edited July 03, 2001).]

    [This message has been edited by Drooling Dog (edited July 03, 2001).]
    - Scott

  • #2
    Nice review!

    Thanks

    Kurt
    Kurt

    Pearl drums converted with hart adc, roland kd7's, pd 120 for snare, various roland rubber pads, hart e cymbals and pads, td8, td6, 2 mackie srm450s and mackie sub. mackie sr 24-4 mixer........and always growing.

    Comment


    • #3
      Very helpful. Thanks. It seems everyone has pretty nice things to say about Hart products. Howard

      ps - regarding Roland pricing...not sure if this will help anyone - but when I ordered my 2nd CY14C crash last week from midwestpercussion.com, the "checkout" price was $209 even though I was expecting to pay the listed "sale" price of $245. Turns out, their "real" pricing is $209, $209, $249 for the CY12, CY14 and CY15 which you only find out when you add them to your shopping cart. I know, still not cheap but a bit better...

      Comment


      • #4
        I found the hi-hat and ride prices somewhat close. The crash prices was where Roland was eliminated in the competition for my business. Seeing as how I was going to go a different way with the crashes anyway, I was prompted to explore other ride options as well.

        ------------------
        Drooling Dog
        - Scott

        Comment


        • #5
          Great review. But: how do the cymbals sound?
          Robert

          Comment


          • #6
            I tried the new CY 6's today and was very disappointed. The CY-14's are far superior.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by puttenvr:
              Great review. But: how do the cymbals sound?
              Funny man.

              ------------------
              Drooling Dog
              - Scott

              Comment


              • #8
                I guess it shows how different we are. I got 2 of the CY6's, and LOVE THEM. They are the best buy out there I think. They are just great in every way. And at $77.95 ea, you can't beat that. I got mine one a price match at Sam Ash. They beat the midwest price. Oh well, different strokes....
                :rolleyes:

                Comment


                • #9
                  jgel,
                  Glad you like the 6's. They are a bargain as you have stated. I've been using the Cy-14's with the TDW-1 and the responce is amazing. Did you demo the V Crashes? If so, were they set up loose to "swing" properly? Just curious as I was comparing the two.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    In case you're interested in Hong Kong the prices at Tom Lee Music (the only retailer I know that does e-drums) are:
                    CY-6 HK$650 About US$83
                    CY-12H HK$1350 About US$173
                    CY-14C HK$1450 About US$186
                    CY-15R HK$1500 About US$192

                    Thought you might like to compare. I did look at the Hat and the CY6s last night. The Hat is as loud as a PD7 maybe louder and did not seem worth the price for how it felt. The CY6s seemed cool but I have to wait 2 to 3 months for them to come in. (I saw them on the TD6).

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      hey droolin dog...check this out -http://www.vdrums.com/discussion/Forum4/HTML/000857.html

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Cliff-
                        I did try the V-crashes, and thought that they were VERY nice, but pricey. The CY6's choke as well, and I can get 4 for the price of one. I wish I could aford the VCrash. The CY6 swings OK, but not perfect. I was thinking of trying out a cymbal spring with it. But I really do love the CY6, best trigger on the market for the price. I am waiting for Sam Ash to get more in so I can get 2 more.
                        :rolleyes:

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The Hart high hat is awesome, but loud. It is made of metal, too just like the ride. It plays and looks just like the real thing.

                          Hey Drooling dog, the first time I saw the pix of your kit I thought the visu-lite china I thought it was painted gold like the Harts. It took me a while to figure out it was translucent.

                          BTW, how do you get so many pads into your TD-10? I'm assuming you split the input for your kicks and use only one input for your ride. Is that correct? I'm thinking of doing the same thing, but not sure how to split the cable for the kicks.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Splitting the kick input into two pads should be in the manual.

                            ------------------
                            szvook
                            Studio

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by snared:
                              BTW, how do you get so many pads into your TD-10? I'm assuming you split the input for your kicks and use only one input for your ride. Is that correct? I'm thinking of doing the same thing, but not sure how to split the cable for the kicks.
                              The kicks are Y'd into one jack. The ride only occupies one also. No bell sound right now, but I think I'll have that resolved within the next 24 hours. Right now I have the bell sound attached to the outside edge of my right-side hi-hat.

                              My V-drums are almost officially complete. They've changed a bit since the last pic I posted. Hopefully I'll be posting more in the "General" forum within the next day or two. Stay tuned.

                              ------------------
                              Drooling Dog
                              - Scott

                              Comment

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