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New Marshall Electronic Drum Amp?

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  • New Marshall Electronic Drum Amp?

    A guitarist told me the other day that Marshall have just released an electronic drum amp/monitor.
    He is a reliable guy so I don't think he is talking ****, but I can't see anything on there web site.
    Also some one reckons that using a bass cabinet would make a great V drum monitor. I am getting a bit sick of lugging about two EV speakers and a power amp and mixer for my monitors.
    Anyone else use a bass cabinet as a monitor?

  • #2
    I think a keyboard combo would better suffice because of the 15 inch speaker <> horn (tweeter) combination. I have heard that guitar and bass guitar cabinets use shallow speakers which give a different sound character. From this keyboard combos should be more universal.

    I use an old Peavey electronic drum combo (ED-300) myself which was built in those days that electronic drums used to be popular (1980s). If you can get one second hand: try it.
    Robert

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    • #3
      ANYONE ELSE LISTEN TO V's THROUGH A COMBO BASS AMP?

      I listened to a CD of my vdrums through a Marshall base amp at a shop the other day, and I have to say I was blown away.

      It was a 15" Marshall base amp with HF horn, and by setting the Equalizers, compression and HF horn volume you can get a great customised powerful sound out of it - awesome bass and still covering the cymbals very well.

      I've only just started looking around for a monitor setup though - havent had the chance to hear JBL etc yet.


      MARSHALL 200W 72115 Combo Bass amp with volume controlled HF Horn. http://www.marshallamps.com/images/bass/bassframe.htm

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      • #4
        Click on BASS COMBOS of the above link to get to the 72115

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        • #5
          Originally posted by sector7:
          ANYONE ELSE LISTEN TO V's THROUGH A COMBO BASS AMP?
          Did you already get deaf by listening to the Marshall AND SHOUT SO MUCH
          Robert

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          • #6


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            • #7
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              <font face="Arial" size="7" color="#800080"><strong>Why do you shout so much</strong></font></p>
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              Robert

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              • #8
                Just get a decent set of in-ears and make your stage be a breathtakenly oasis of tranquility......huh.....did I wrote this.

                Anyway this works wonders for your Pa-sound


                Grtz. Phze

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                • #9
                  Dear Purplehaze,

                  Great point!

                  And it's an interesting topic, which I think is new -- How useful are In-ear monitors for V-drummers?

                  Do you use them? How accurate are they? Do they really protect your hearing? Does the kick really come through? Are $500.00 per pop Sony's the only real option?

                  Sorry for all the questions, but your post really perked my interest! Thanks.
                  Immensely powerful yet with a liquid cat-quick elegance

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by gingerbaker:
                    Dear Purplehaze,

                    Great point!

                    And it's an interesting topic, which I think is new -- How useful are In-ear monitors for V-drummers?

                    Do you use them? How accurate are they? Do they really protect your hearing? Does the kick really come through? Are $500.00 per pop Sony's the only real option?

                    Sorry for all the questions, but your post really perked my interest! Thanks.
                    To answer all your quesions simply: Yes, extremely, yes, yes, and no.
                    To elaborate a little:
                    I've been using Shure PSM 600's for a while now, and am extremely pleased with them, the earphones were made by a German company called Koettgen Hoerakustik using the Westone in-ear design (molded earpieces around a good quality earphone [Aiwa, forget which model]). The molded earphones really protect your hearing, since you're sonically isolated from the noise around you (I hear NOTHING from the rest of the band without my monitor signal) you can drive your monitor signal at a very low level, BUT, I don't think your ears will be protected when using the stock earphones, or those cheap walkman earbuds, you'll have to get earpieces molded. Since my earphones are very bassy I need not worry about the kick coming through, normally all I have to do is turn down the bass, and I have a really transparent monitor mix at a very low and pleasant volume. It's like listening to a CD in your living room most times.
                    It's well worth the investment if you can rely on your drums being well represented in your PA, and you can count on the rest of the band hearing them through their monitors, My band has no speakers whatsoever on stage, our guitarists plug their preamps directly into the mixer, and we all use in-ears. We have the quietest on-stage sound you can imagine, and, as opposed to the bands we play with sometimes, we leave the stage without that annoying buzz in our ears after the gig.
                    "Fry that sound effect, Moriarty, we're having it for breakfast"

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                    • #11
                      I have to agree with mcconaghy.
                      You need custommade earpieces for a good result and prevent hearingloss.

                      also important is it to feed your in-ears with a signal that is free of loud peaks.
                      So you have to make sure there is a good limiter inserted.

                      What you lack in this situation is the feeling/ punch of the drums wich can be solved by a stageshaker/ bass-skaker under your drumstool.
                      This device delivers vibrations of 100 Hz and less and simulates a huge kick/ low tom impression.
                      It's my wish to get one for my drumset just for the fun.
                      I've tried it, it's really great

                      Grtz, Phze

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                      • #12
                        Purplehaze and mcconaghy,

                        Thanks for all the info! The concept of not having to haul around stage monitors and amp to run them is very very appealing to my old bones. Definitely going to look into this!

                        Immensely powerful yet with a liquid cat-quick elegance

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                        • #13
                          Custom in the ear monitors alone are not sufficient to protect your hearing. The attenuation characteristics of the ear molds must be tested directly. It's possible to have a custom mold that is poorly fit and does a poor job of attenuating the outside sound.

                          Even with a great custom molded in the ear monitor, the sound pressure at the eardrum should be monitored. It's unfortunately way to easy to adapt to harmful levels of sound.

                          With the V drums the possibility is there to have lower levels on stage while still "slamming" through a set. The potential is there to do less harm to your hearing. Of course with high-powered sound systems the potential is there to significant hearing loss.

                          All drummers should have their hearing tested at least once a year. File the results and see if your hearing changes over time.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by X Navy Drummer:
                            Custom in the ear monitors alone are not sufficient to protect your hearing. The attenuation characteristics of the ear molds must be tested directly. It's possible to have a custom mold that is poorly fit and does a poor job of attenuating the outside sound.

                            Even with a great custom molded in the ear monitor, the sound pressure at the eardrum should be monitored. It's unfortunately way to easy to adapt to harmful levels of sound.

                            With the V drums the possibility is there to have lower levels on stage while still "slamming" through a set. The potential is there to do less harm to your hearing. Of course with high-powered sound systems the potential is there to significant hearing loss.

                            All drummers should have their hearing tested at least once a year. File the results and see if your hearing changes over time.

                            I'll second everything you just said. Get your hearing checked regularly, and have them syringed at the same time. Excessive earwax build-up in your inner ear (which can go unnoticed for quite a while) leads to you adjusting and re-adjusting sound levels until you reach very harmful levels. Normally after havingh your ears syringed the first thing you do is turn the treble WAAAAAAAAAAYYYYYYYYYYYY down on your car stereo ;-)

                            Oh yeah, in my post back then I forgot to mention, if you have in-ear monitors, your most important piec of equipment will be a limiter. Without one you're running risk of blowing your brains out across the floor. High frequency peaks at that close a proximity can be extremely painful and can incapacitate you for hours, maybe even days.
                            DBX has a new processor for in-ear monitor systems called the IEM, which I'm eager to check. It acts not only as a limiter but also as a complete EQ specially designed for this purpose. This may be the ultimate piece of gear us in-ear users have been waiting for, and I hope the price tag won't be too lofty.

                            I'll recommend Westone earmolds, they have a very high quality, and I've yet to see a poorly made or fitted one. They'll tell you where you can have the molds made, and only hve them made at places the manufacturers trust and highly recommend. I'm very pleased with mine, especially with the consistency in quality, as I have some ER-25 earplugs from the same company with removable inserts, and they really do their job.
                            But if there's anything you'd recommend, X Navy Drummer, I'm eager to hear it, any way to keep my hearing just that little bit longer is worth it!

                            Stu
                            "Fry that sound effect, Moriarty, we're having it for breakfast"

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