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Roland TD-25KV in 2020?

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  • Roland TD-25KV in 2020?

    Hi everyone,

    This is my first post here. I found a used TD-25KV for sale ~1600 EUR. Do you think it's worth it? (especially now that it is being phased out for the TD27). I was otherwise thinking of the TD17 (but that one does not have position sensing) or the Millennium MPS 850 (which is only ~800 new and apparently offers the same characteristics as the Roland.... but hey, I guess a Roland may be a better bet?).

    Any input is appreciated. Thanks!


  • #2
    Quite a difficult one. I don’t think there is much love for the millennium kits. I wouldn’t go there if you can avoid it. You mention PS so are you intending to trigger vst drums on a computer? PS is good for that but not a substitute for better sounds if you intend to use the module sounds. I haven’t played the td17 or 27 so can’t really comment but a lot of people on here like them compared to the last generation which the td25 is. I use a td30 (same generation and sound type as td25) but don’t use the sounds from it. I only trigger vst drums. I personally think the sounds are quite good except the toms which are appalling. Also think of how many trigger inputs you want as they are quite low and depending on the model and if it has midi in and assignable extra sounds via midi. Most of the lower newer models don’t but a lot of older ones don’t have midi in either.

    have a really good think about what you want and don’t jump in. One advantage the Rolands have is a good second hand value.
    Roland TD30 module on TD20 kit SD3 with various kits. Pearl Masters Kit, Yamaha 9000RC original natural wood finish. Cymbals from Zildgian Pasite and Sabian. Loads of percussion bits. Cubase and Wavelab always current versions.

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    • #3
      There are a lot people on this forum that love the drum module sounds of TD-25 (and TD-30). And then there are others that think the TD-17 is a major step forward in sounds when compared to TD-25. I would get some good headphone and listen to some kit play throughs online. I started my edrum experience with a TD-17 and I really enjoy it (I never looked back to older kits).

      The TD-25 has a unique interface when compared to other Roland modules. So just be aware. Also, the TD-17 (or TD-27) allows you to import one shot samples. The TD-27 will bring you arguably the best snare and ride cymbal in the market, however you will have to pay for it.

      Since you live in Europe you may want to check out a Roland TD-17 from DrumTec that has their own artist pack that comes with the kit. I use VEX with my TD-17 and I think that is just great for me. DrumTec may work out nicely for you.

      If PS is important to you then this used Roland TD-25 may be a pretty good deal for you. Would be a newer generation used PS capable module. If you ever want more kits you can get TD-25 VEX kits (tweaks of internal sounds only, no import of one shot samples allowed on TD-25) or go the VST route. Personally if I was going to upgrade my TD-17 for PS, and I couldn’t afford a TD-27 digital upgrade, I would go for a used TD-30 over a TD-25. However, with that being said I’m saving up for a TD-27 digital upgrade in the next couple years, purely for the snare and ride.

      I would stick with Roland, ATV or the newer Alesis strike pros (after they fixed their quality issues on first run). The quality of these companies are worth it, with Roland arguably the best quality or at least reputation. I was completely new to edrums when I got my TD-17. I watched some videos on how to set up, followed the instructions, installed a VEX kits, started to play and it all just worked. No issues and super easy. High confidence my kids can play on same kit years from now. That to me is worth a premium price.

      TD-17KVX (Snare = PD-125BK, Tom 1 = PDX-100, Tom 2 (Head zone only) = PDX-12, Tom 3 = PDX-12, Tom 4 (Rim zone of Tom 2 split via female splitter from drumsplitter.com) = PDX-8, CY4 (Aux) = CY-5, Combo VEX Series 3 And Designer. Alesis Strike Multipad with Alesis RealHat pedal and Boss FS-6.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by mkok View Post
        Also think of how many trigger inputs you want as they are quite low and depending on the model and if it has midi in and assignable extra sounds via midi. Most of the lower newer models don’t but a lot of older ones don’t have midi in either.
        the td-25 does not have MIDI IN nor can it use splitters or even simply re-assign the "rim zones" to different sounds than the heads on dual zone pads (if your head sound is a snare, you get a snare rim sound and it's locked to that, no cowbells or whatever)

        i personally prefer the td-25/30 generation sounds to the td-17/50 and especially the 27 which i don't like at all, but roland illogically nerfed the basic expansion options present on basically all their other modules on this "advanced" module. so for inputs what you see is what you get.
        Last edited by winterson; 10-20-20, 09:12 AM.
        Alesis STRIKE, PD-85 rack toms, PD-105BK floor tom, Mapex snare with ISM-6, PDP MX 22" kick with ISM, iron cobra 900 double pedal, hart e-cymbal2, CY-5 as splash, CY-8, CY-12R, L80 hi-hat with cheap-o trigger with goedrum hi hat controller. EZdrummer2+EZX/Addictive Drums 2 VSTs.

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