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Headphones for Roland TD17: with or without active noise canceling

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  • Headphones for Roland TD17: with or without active noise canceling

    I’m wanting to replace a cheap set of Sony headphones that have active noise canceling(ANC) and upgrade to a better pair with high audio fidelity. I bought, and quickly returned a Sony WH-XB900N set because the ANC caused a delay between the pad strike and the assigned sound. I’ve seen a few people on here mention not to use ones with ANC. Is this a common problem? Or is there another reason. I was going in this direction with headphone selection because of hearing the stick strike the pads, especially the cymbals. I’m now considering Sennheiser HD300/HD280PRO. Any input would be appreciated.

    Scott

  • #2
    Do a search as there are quite a few threads on headphones on here already
    Roland TD30 module on TD20 kit SD3 with various kits. Pearl Masters Kit, Yamaha 9000RC original natural wood finish. Cymbals from Zildgian Pasite and Sabian. Loads of percussion bits. Cubase and Wavelab always current versions.

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    • #3
      Read the sticky post for headphones.
      https://www.vdrums.com/forum/general...pic-headphones
      *** Never buy a module without MIDI IN ***
      Yamaha & Roland modules. DTX,TM-2, EC-10, EC10m, SP-404. Multi12. TrapKat. ControlPads. Octapad, SamplePad, Wavedrum. Handsonic. Dynacord RhythmStick. MPC. Paiste 2002/Signatures. Cajons. Djembes. Darbuka. Windsynth. MIDI Bass. Tenori-on. Zoom ARQ. Synths. Ukes.

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      • #4
        It's not the ANC, it's the wireless bluetooth which always has latency which means you can't use them in real-time for monitoring applications. For the best audio quality resulsts, please forget ANY consumer grade hifi stuff you've seen (including noise cancelling nonsense) and spend your budget - your WHOLE budget - on pro audio specification wired headphones.

        You've returned a $150 set of consumer headphones but are considering replacing them with either a $40 or $80 set of consumer headphones? Just spend the full $150 on pro spec wired cans, go for closed-back if you want isolation from the pad noise - Beyerdynamic 770 or Audio Technica M50X would be the pick for me.
        Last edited by flurbs; 08-04-20, 05:56 AM.

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        • #5
          On the subject of noise cancellation - For my e drums (roland td17 kvx) I've been using my Sennheiser HD600 headphones that I got for mixing. They offer almost no blocking of outside sounds whatsoever, and they keep no sound in either (just the nature of open back headphones like this). They're the most comfortable ones I've got so I've been using those.

          My point is, when I'm using them for e drums I dont actually hear the acoustic sounds of the pads. I live in an apartment and haven't yet built a platform so I'm still playing on the gentle side somewhat, and I'm not cranking the volume either. At my ears maybe it's equivalent to 85db SPL if you are familiar with those kinds of measurements. But yeah it's not like I can hear the pads thunking away over the headphone's sound, even with the headphones' near total absence of isolation from outside sounds.

          This isn't a recommendation for the Sennheisers, but rather a suggestion that you might not need to block out as much sound as you think.

          You also might want to consider in-ear monitors. They can block out as much sound as the most rugged earplugs and will often supply great fidelity too. I have a pair of Shure 215's that sound great for a lot of applications. They're comfortable and loud and sound pretty dang good.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by flurbs View Post
            It's not the ANC, it's the wireless bluetooth which always has latency which means you can't use them in real-time for monitoring applications. For the best audio quality resulsts, please forget ANY consumer grade hifi stuff you've seen (including noise cancelling nonsense) and spend your budget - your WHOLE budget - on pro audio specification wired headphones.

            You've returned a $150 set of consumer headphones but are considering replacing them with either a $40 or $80 set of consumer headphones? Just spend the full $150 on pro spec wired cans, go for closed-back if you want isolation from the pad noise - Beyerdynamic 770 or Audio Technica M50X would be the pick for me.
            Thanks to everyone for the input. I ended up buying the Sennheiser hd300pro‘s and I’m very happy with them. They aren’t as loud as the headphones I was using but the clarity, balance, and isolation are great, and my ears appreciate the lower level decibels.

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