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Should I convert my accoustic kit or go for a new electronic kit?

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  • #16
    Thanks all! This is great input. I still don't know what I'll do but I have some months to consider this all.

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    • #17
      Do listen to people playing a TD50 vs Drumit5 vs Mimic.
      Listen to the sounds.

      Myself, I don't think I can go ever back to Roland or Yamaha module sounds.
      Coming from the acoustic side, you have to figure out if you like the modelled sounds of Roland.

      I don't have the funds to buy a Mimic (too many other hobbies, plus they are double the regular price where I live) so I settled on VSTs.
      I had a computer laying around, along sound interfaces. I just needed the device between the triggers and the computer.

      Entered a little gem, lately. The eDRUMin. Cheap interface, but sporting some of the best triggering on the planet. Easy to configure, but has so many tweaks available, you can really get the triggering matching your playing style perfectly. And it works with 99% of all the drum triggers out there, whichever company you choose.

      Amazing triggering and VST sounds.
      I'm never going back to a module.
      DTX700, A2E Dixon kit, Yamaha cymbals, FSR HH
      Kit Pix http://vdrums.com/forum/album.php?albumid=613

      My new venture, HiEnd Speakers. : voglosounds.com

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      • #18
        it doesn't have to be 'expensive' ..there are a couple of companies who build e-kits for very competitive prices..
        check the DIY section.. or the 'showcase' section for idea's .. i'm not going to name names ..
        that's just another idea.. converting and diy could be cheaper.. cymbals (if rubber) a lot can be found used ..

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        • #19
          To be honest, I'm not too concerned about price. I like some value for money of course, but time is more valuable to me so when I play drums I'd like to enjoy it to the fullest. However, there could be people in similar situations, who read this thread for whom price would be a more important factor in the decision making process.

          Being a bit of a tech guy, I actually like the sound modelling approach by Roland. I agree that Mimic's out of the box sounds are much more convincing, and I have played using a VST before, but I don't mind the process of tuning and creating my own kits.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by ZSP_Willem View Post
            To be honest, I'm not too concerned about price. I like some value for money of course, but time is more valuable to me so when I play drums I'd like to enjoy it to the fullest. However, there could be people in similar situations, who read this thread for whom price would be a more important factor in the decision making process.

            Being a bit of a tech guy, I actually like the sound modelling approach by Roland. I agree that Mimic's out of the box sounds are much more convincing, and I have played using a VST before, but I don't mind the process of tuning and creating my own kits.
            Note that you can do extensive editing in the Mimic more like a real recording studio to create kits. You can EQ and compress each mic of each drum,and the master output. I had the ATV pads with Mimic and am right now using the TD27 plus Mimic with a mixture of pads.

            The only reason I sold the ATV pads was that the snare and floor tom were 13 inch and I prefer 14. The ATV and new Roland VAD pads feel very different especially with the cones on the edge. The full size adds stability and changes the feel as well.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by ach987 View Post
              I think you nailed most of the pros/cons yourself. I'd like to add one more factor for you to consider.

              Converting an acoustic kit can take a lot of time. I thought I'd just buy the parts, drop in the trigger, put on the heads and call it a day. But in reality I spent a long time trying to carefully pop out the vent hole grommet on each drum without causing any damage in order to fit the cable connector (I didn't want an external cable connector nor did I want to start drilling holes in my drums.) Then I spent time fiddling with the trigger placement and trigger settings in the module to get them to work well. Figuring out the best tension for my mesh heads on each tom to nail the feel and performance. And those rim condoms...boy was that annoying to put on. Oh...and the time spent watching conversion videos (hats off to Justin at 65 Drums) to figure it all out.

              It really is an easy process, and now I can do conversions very quickly. But that first one will be a time drain. Make sure you factor that in.

              All that being said, it is SO REWARDING to play to play on an E-Kit that you built yourself.
              I second every one of these thoughts.. except.... The only difference is, I knew the first build was gonna take time, so I just settled in with that and enjoyed the trip.

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              • #22
                there's also the part where you order stuff and then wait, and wait, and then it arrives and it may not be exactly what you thought/wanted/needed and then you have to order more, and wait, and wait...
                Alesis STRIKE, PD-85 rack toms, PD-105BK floor tom, Mapex snare with ISM-6, PDP MX 22" kick with ISM, iron cobra 900 double pedal, hart e-cymbal2, CY-5 as splash, CY-8, CY-12R, L80 hi-hat with cheap-o trigger with goedrum hi hat controller. EZdrummer2+EZX/Addictive Drums 2 VSTs.

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                • #23
                  It sounds like you have thought about it quite carefully already and are on the right track. It's going to be hard for anyone else to make up your mind for you. I think your key decisions are:

                  1) What sound do you want?

                  - For me, the most realistic sounding drums come by utilising VSTs - specifically Superior Drummer 3.0
                  - The 'VST' e Drum route isn't exactly plug and play. There will often be a fair bit of research and tinkering to be done before hand to make sure things are set up optimally and to get the best sound out of your gear. Getting your drum gear to talk to your computer is often where the difficult bit lies
                  - The Mimic Pro does offer a plug and play solution for VST sounds but it is on the expensive side of the spectrum, and the in-built sounds are Steven Slate Drums which in my opinion are pretty good but not quite at Superior Drummer 3.0 level
                  - A lot of modules now offer USB (or other) connections that mean that you can utilise VSTs even if you buy a module with in-built sounds

                  2) What style of kit do you want to play?

                  - pretty much all paths now can produce a kit that to an untrained eye would like like an acoustic set with full size bass drum, snare, toms and realistically sized cymbals
                  - if space is a big consideration then it could mean making compromises on how realistic your kit looks, but not necessarily
                  - if you want to keep your acoustic kit together and not make modifications, then purchasing external triggers are possible. you can actually play a triggered set with acoustic heads on. this is probably a good route if you are playing acoustic most of the time but want to add something to your drums and change your sound a bit
                  - it is possible to keep your acoustic kit and have internal triggers but this requires varying degrees of modification to your kit which you may or may not be comfortable with
                  - if you want 'digital' kit pieces, then you are tied to the Roland system and in particular Roland TD50 or TD27 modules. these apparently are a bit more responsive but I don't think the difference is very big here
                  - it is possible to mix/match different brands. there is no reason that all your gear MUST be Roland, or ATV or any other brand. However, just be careful with compatibility and do your research beforehand
                  - with regard to your comment that you would like something new to play on, you can easily re-wrap and refurbish your existing drum set. It is now quite easy to re-wrap and refurbish a drum set to look like new. I'm just in the process of doing this myself and have done it before.

                  3) How do you want to put your kit together?

                  - if you go pre-assembled, there are plenty of manufacturers who will assemble the kit for you and ship it to you at a premium price. In my opinion Drum-Tec are the best quality ones, but ATV and Roland make realistic looking offerings, and there are also people like Diamond Drums and Jobeky who do very nice work and I'm sure people on this forum are very satisfied with their products from them
                  - there are then variations of DIY ranging from just buying prebuilt individual triggers (e.g DrumTec snare, 3 PD125s for Toms, KD140 for kick, ATV Hi hat, Jobeky cymbals and mount it on appropriate hardware) to buying the internal trigger components and installing them on your own drums (e.g. UFO drum triggers, Drone, R Drums, Jobeky, Jman etc.), to the very DIY end which is design and put together your own triggers together and make your own cymbals
                  - personally, you get what you pay for with eDrums. Reproducing good reliable triggering from snares, hi hats, rides and cymbals in general isn't that easy. In my opinion, you are better off spending money here than experimenting and ending up with something you aren't happy with

                  I am currently going down the converting my cheap acoustic drums route. I haven't had a lot of free time due to work commitments, but for me I've chosen to go down the VST route. I will modify my existing el cheapo acoustic set with pre-built internal triggers, but some components I will build myself (e.g. the piezo's and wiring and jacks etc. ). Like Perceval above, I will probably go down the Trigger-USB/Midi route as I don't want to blow the money on a mimic as I'm not that keen on Steven Slate Drums and I already have the Superior line up from previous iterations of my drum set. All when I eventually get enough time, and then after all that, hopefully I will play it!

                  As always, do your research first. There are plenty of resources on this forum, but also on Youtube, as well as Digital Drummer Mag for reviews and other interesting articles. Good Luck!

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                  • #24
                    I've been using my td 4 with a VST because the module sounds are terrible. The VST option is still open, but I saw that with some tinkering it is also possible to make the (modern) roland modules sound good.

                    If I'm going for a kit with wooden shells, I'll likely convert my own accoustic kit by adding internal triggers. Otherwise, I'm still looking at high-end digital kits of which I think the td 50 kv is probably the best option for me. I like the idea of the digital snare and ride and the large tom and cymbal sizes. However, I could look into getting that kit but with the td 27 module. If I choose to convert, getting a td 27 module with digital snare and ride would still be an option but so is using a mimic pro or a simpler module with a good VST... So many options :-)

                    I know its a decision that I need to make myself, but so far this thread has given me some new input to think about so it's been very helpful to me.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Macarina View Post

                      I second every one of these thoughts.. except.... The only difference is, I knew the first build was gonna take time, so I just settled in with that and enjoyed the trip.
                      Nice conversion! How's your kick playing? I kind of hate my td 4 rubber pad and was hoping that a mesh head would feel more like the real deal.

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