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Roland Kick Pads

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  • Roland Kick Pads

    Hi, I'm looking at upgrading my kick pad from a KD-8 to a KD-10 but also considering the 18" or 22" models.
    My question is are the bigger drum pads worth the extra money? I know they look better and much more like a real kit but sound wise and feel wise are they any different to the KD-10?

    Thanks

  • #2
    if you dont mind the look, i suggest the kd85, solid construction, silent and comfortable (meshhead) feeling. the perfect compromise between size and construction. In general i think compact kits are an advantage, my bedroom kit is mostly like a td17kvx with a Kd85 and an ATV ad5 module. I am also own the KT10 (for nord drum pads) and like it for the heavy construction but think (if you play acoustic drums also) playing a real drumpedal is more realistic and better to train your skills.

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    • #3
      I'm not 100% clear on the differences between the KD-9 and KD-10, but I have the impression they're about the same.
      If that's the case, the KD-10 would have a pretty damn good feel for its price, but would be annoyingly loud. The KD-85 would be quieter but it would feel like crap. The 18" and 22" kicks from Roland are a KD-9 mounted on a drum head, so it provides a really good feel but it's noisy as hell. There are other kicks where you will only have to compromise on money, or you can buy one of the available trigger systems and convert an acoustic bass drum yourself (with mixed results).

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      • #4
        Excessium wrote:
        I'm not 100% clear on the differences between the KD-9 and KD-10, but I have the impression they're about the same. If that's the case, the KD-10 would have a pretty damn good feel for its price, but would be annoyingly loud.
        KD-9 and KD-10 are identical in terms of feel and noise. KD-9 is the better build though, because it's easy to open for maintenance. You can take the entire KD-9 apart with a Philips screwdriver. I've never been able to open a KT-10 as its rubber-covered enclosure is sealed, without obvious fasteners, threaded portions, or clasps. Turning and pulling either half of the enclosure provided no results. There is also a rubber lip and I lifted this to look for hidden fasteners; no results there, either. If there is a way to open the KD-10, Roland concealed it well.

        The reason you want to open the KD-9 / KD-10 is to install additional felt padding. I did this with my KD-9, which reduces noise considerably and makes the pad feel better. If I could figure out how to open the KD-10, I assume adding felt would work with that pad, too.

        Regarding noise and feel in general, excepting the KT-9, all V-Drum bass drum solutions are fairly loud. Yes, each has its own noise characteristics, but each pad / drum is similarly loud in different ways. Consequently, I would not say a KD-85 is quieter than a KD-9 / KD-10, KD-120, KD-140, KD-180, or KD-220. The question is will the amount of noise produced work within whatever restrictions you have. Even the KT-10 (kick trigger only pedal, no pad) is still quite loud.

        The KT-9 (another kick trigger only pedal, no pad) is the only solution from Roland that is markedly quieter than any of their other solutions. However, the tradeoff with the KT-9 is it's a soft pedal, like the FD-9 hi-hat controller. So, the KT-9 feels more like playing a bass drum with a smooth hi-hat pedal. The result is the quietest bass drum solution I've ever used, but the pedal does not feel anything like playing a bass drum or bass drum pad. Your playing is restricted accordingly; it's difficult to play fast double and triples with the KT-9 and some bass drum techniques simply do not work with the KT-9.
        Last edited by TangTheHump; 12-09-19, 08:00 PM.

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        • #5
          Thanks guys, this is all really helpful. I never thought about the KD-85 or KD-120. Cheers

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          • #6
            Originally posted by TangTheHump View Post

            KD-9 and KD-10 are identical inRegarding noise and feel in general, excepting the KT-9, all V-Drum bass drum solutions are fairly loud. Yes, each has its own noise characteristics, but each pad / drum is similarly loud in different ways. Consequently, I would not say a KD-85 is quieter than a KD-9 / KD-10, KD-120, KD-140, KD-180, or KD-220. The question is will the amount of noise produced work within whatever restrictions you have. Even the KT-10 (kick trigger only pedal, no pad) is still quite loud.
            But i would say so because i had them all and compared them. the kd85 is much quieter than the kd120 i.e.
            The kd140 is superb but very expensive.
            yes every pedal makes some noise but i suggested the kd85 with good reasons. The prinziple of a small meshhead
            "eats" up a lot of energy with the best noise ratio. Small meshheads reacts more precise than big meshheads, thats why i
            would stay away from 20" DIY Kickpads. Everything bigger than 14" is purely for the look.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by TangTheHump View Post

              The reason you want to open the KD-9 / KD-10 is to install additional felt padding. I did this with my KD-9, which reduces noise considerably and makes the pad feel better. If I could figure out how to open the KD-10, I assume adding felt would work with that pad, too.
              Interesting. That might help indeed.

              Originally posted by TangTheHump View Post
              I would not say a KD-85 is quieter than a KD-9 / KD-10, KD-120, KD-140, KD-180, or KD-220. The question is will the amount of noise produced work within whatever restrictions you have.
              I haven't had the KD-9 and KD-85 in the same room so I can't be sure, but I think there are noticeable differences between them (and especially compared to a KD-220). Some types of noise would be harder to measure, as the KD-220 would have more resonating noise for instance, but I imagine you'd see a difference in volume and even more so in pitch - the "annoying" kind of noise that KD-9 is infamous for.

              Comment


              • #8
                Docdoghouse wrote:
                But i would say so because i had them all and compared them. the kd85 is much quieter than the kd120. The kd140 is superb, but very expensive. Yes every pedal makes some noise, but i suggested the kd85 with good reasons. The prinziple of a small mesh head "eats" up a lot of energy with the best noise ratio. Small mesh heads react more precise than big mesh heads, that's why i
                would stay away from 20 inch DIY kick pads. Everything bigger than 14 is purely for the look.
                I've played all of Roland's bass drums (or kick pads as they like to call them) and pedals. Currently, I own a KD-9 and a KD-140. The KD-140 is somewhat quieter than a stock KD-9, but I like the feel of the KD-9 much better. Noise-wise, my modified KD-9 is on par with or quieter than the KD-140. The KD-220 is the loudest. To me, the KD-85 feels like hitting a wall; it's super bouncy yet hard, and offers none of the give and control an acoustic bass drum does.

                20 inch bass drums with mesh heads feel great to me. I'm not talking about a 20 inch bass drum with an embedded pad, like the KD-180 and KD-220. Rather, I mean a full 20 inch mesh head. This, to me, feels closest to an acoustic bass drum, albeit bouncier but not in a bad way.

                Excessium wrote:
                I haven't had the KD-9 and KD-85 in the same room so I can't be sure, but I think there are noticeable differences between them (and especially compared to a KD-220). Some types of noise would be harder to measure, as the KD-220 would have more resonating noise for instance, but I imagine you'd see a difference in volume and even more so in pitch - the "annoying" kind of noise that KD-9 is infamous for.
                A stock KD-9 has a fair amount of attack. Surprisingly, it also transfers quite a bit of low-end noise through the floor, or maybe a better way to say this is it excites low-end vibrations in the floor. At any rate, you are correct there are noticeable differences between the pads. I was talking more from the view that anything loud enough to annoy neighbors is too loud, and pretty much all Roland bass drum pads fall into that category. KT-9 (integrated kick trigger pedal that works without a pad) is the only offering I know of from Roland quiet enough that may not disturb neighbors.
                Last edited by TangTheHump; 12-10-19, 02:32 PM.

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                • #9
                  Oh yeah, I do agree that all of these kicks might have about the same impact noise.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by TangTheHump View Post

                    I've played all of Roland's bass drums (or kick pads as they like to call them) and pedals. Currently, I own a KD-9 and a KD-140. The KD-140 is somewhat quieter than a stock KD-9, but I like the feel of the KD-9 much better. Noise-wise, my modified KD-9 is on par with or quieter than the KD-140. The KD-220 is the loudest. To me, the KD-85 feels like hitting a wall; it's super bouncy yet hard, and offers none of the give and control an acoustic bass drum does.

                    20 inch bass drums with mesh heads feel great to me. I'm not talking about a 20 inch bass drum with an embedded pad, like the KD-180 and KD-220. Rather, I mean a full 20 inch mesh head. This, to me, feels closest to an acoustic bass drum, albeit bouncier but not in a bad way.
                    i completely agree with you about the KD-85, KD-9, and using a mesh head on a regular kick (though mine is a 22"). if i wasn't going for a more acoustic look i'd go with a KD-9 or 10 for the feel, the KD-85 was an improvement over my original KD-8 but has still long been one of the least favourite e-kit components (besides rubber hi hats) and i'd agree with your description entirely.
                    Alesis STRIKE, PD-85 rack toms, PD-105BK floor tom, Mapex snare with ISM-6, PDP MX 22" kick with ISM, iron cobra 900 double pedal, hart e-cymbal2, CY-5 as splash, CY-8, CY-12R, L80 hi-hat with cheap-o trigger with goedrum hi hat controller. EZdrummer2+EZX/Addictive Drums 2 VSTs.

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                    • #11
                      Same experience here. I have a KD-9 and KD-120. I like the feel of the KD-9 better but I like the look of the KD-120. One advantage of the KD-120 (at least in my situation) is it tends to stay in place better. I had to add velcro etc. to keep my KD-9 from moving forward but this was no biggie.

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                      • #12
                        well, meshheads, have by nature a unrealistic feeling, but many find this an advantage because they could be played faster.
                        the kd85 integrates very well into a pdx-6 & pdx-8 setup, but maybe its a matter of taste, "kickin like against awall" maybe you should loosen the head?
                        each his own.

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                        • #13
                          I have this kick trigger https://triggera.com/bix-kick-beater-trigger you can use with any kick drums

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                          • #14
                            Docdoghouse wrote:
                            Well, mesh heads have, by their nature, an unrealistic feeling, but many find this an advantage because they can be played faster. The KD-85 integrates very well into a PDX-6 and PDX-8 setup, but maybe it's a matter of taste, "kicking like against a wall". Maybe you should loosen the head? Each to his own.
                            It's certainly not my intent to deny your enjoyment of the KD-85. I (myself) like the KD-9 yet many people prefer other pads. So yes, absolutely, this is a case of personal preference. There is no right or wrong here, for sure!

                            :-)

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                            • #15
                              Another thing I've considered is the ATV xD-K10 & K13 Kick Drum Pads
                              Has anyone had any experience with these? Any good as an alternative to roland kick pads?

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