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Tips of what module should I buy?

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  • Tips of what module should I buy?

    Hi everyone! I am new here and starting the adventure of converting my Pearl export to electronic drums. I am buying Jobeky internal triggers and cymbals(cheaper than roland's or ATV's). I need to buy a module for the kit and will be using GGD drum library or Superior drummer 2. Any idea which module I could get? Something not too expensive that can give me the dynamic I need to play? Thanks

  • #2
    If youíre going to just trigger a VST, any good Roland module (used 20/30) will work well.
    Alan
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    • #3
      If your budget isn't too high you might also consider a TD-12.

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      • #4
        Thanks for that guys! Iíll consider both ideas!

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        • #5
          i'm still using a TD9 to trigger SD3 with no problems, and triggered SD2 with it before I upgraded also with no problems. you don't get positional sensing on the snare with the TD9, and they are an old module now so you'd want to inspect a 2nd hand one carefully before you bought it. they have midi in and out (not usb) and separate triggering for rim and head, with one 3-zone cymbal slot. they use a dedicated snake cable so that would need to be included in the deal
          E-Kits: Roland TD9v1, Yamaha DTX Multi12, Zendrum EXP; FD9, KT10 // Interfaces: Scarlett 2i4, Scarlett 6i6 // Sounds: Superior Drummer 3, Stompblock // Computers: Macbook, imac // Logic, Garageband // Headphones: ATH-M30x // Speakers: Yamaha DBR10, Yamaha HS7s // A-Kits: DIY compact kit, Mapex Meridian // Cymbals: Zildjian Ks, a few As and Sabians, and ...

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          • #6
            GGD Invasion is the only decent pack that works for live VST - it has enough drums and cymbals with variable hi-hat support to make it worth the pain of using Kontakt.

            Otherwise, start with EZDrummer2, or if you can afford it; go straight to Superior Drummer 3 for edrum nirvana. I tried almost every VST now. I keep returning to SD3.

            I would only get the most modern Roland modules with USB MIDI (like a TD17 / TD25) if I was looking to keep triggering simple.

            Unless you plan on having a large drumkit and need more the inputs, a used TD-30 is probably wiser here, or get a pre-built Megadrum + Audio interface for your PC, to keep latency down and value for money up.
            ♦ Diamond Drums 4pc in Di-Noc carbon ♦ MegaDRUM + Roland UA-1010 / cymbals / KT-10 (x2) ♦ Tama / Gibraltar hardware ♦ JBL LSR3 Series 2.1 Monitoring
            Community Drum Module Document
            PA Specifications (wip)

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            • #7
              As already mentioned, any good condition Roland module or if you like to tinker - MegaDRUM... I use a TD-30 and love it for pushing midi to SD3, but it is a bit overkill for triggering a smaller kit.
              Roland TD-30 & TM-6 Modules | Superior Drummer 3 on PC | Tama Superstar Hyper-Drive Maple A2E w/ R-Drums Triggers | ATV aD Cymbals | Axis Pedals | Tama & Gibraltar HW | Focusrite Clarett 4Pre | Simmons DA200S Monitor | V-MODA Crossfade M-100 OEMs & MEE MX4 PRO IEMs

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              • #8
                Hey guys thank you so much for your replies, I'll think about it! Didn't know about MegaDrum and will learn more about it. Looks like a cheaper solution!

                Maybe there is no need for a Roland module if I am just gonna be using GGD Invasion, but will look for a module just for the sake of easier triggering! Will maybe upgrade for SD3 later, but as I am just going to record youtbe videos, GGD should be enough!

                Thanks again

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                • #9
                  By the way, I can get a 15% discount on the td17 on a drumshop that I work! I just saw that there is 2 extra imputs( Crash and aux) could I use both for another 2 crashes for example and split them if needed if I want to have 4 extra cymbals? I have various Yamaha PCY 135 cymbals....it would be great if i could use with the roland module...........

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                  • #10
                    yamaha pcy135 works are dual zone crash on roland module.

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                    • #11
                      Kolling777,

                      Regarding the TD-17, while I think it's an amazing module for the price, none-the-less, it's a budget module that has poorer build quality, less triggering flexibility, and less trigger I/O as compared to Roland's more professional modules, such as TD-12, TD-20, TD-20X, TD-30, and TD-50. For a DIY kit using real drum shells, you'll appreciate features like individual trigger inputs (which allow you to use separate quarter inch cables to reach specific drums as necessary), additional MIDI mapping capabilities, and the ability to place the module wherever you wish (in the air on a cymbal stand, flat on a table, flat on a drum case, etc.).

                      The TD-17 trigger inputs are on the bottom of the module and use a single DB-25 connector. You plug a proprietary cable snake into the DB-25 and are limited by the cable lengths provided in the snake. You can add cable extenders, but this means you have joins and failure points in the middle of your cables. Plus, because the cable snake plugs into the bottom of the TD-17, you cannot place the module on a flat surface and instead must always mount the module in the air, using a cymbal stand.

                      The flexibility to place the module anywhere, such as on a flat surface, comes in very handy for DIY setups - at least this is my experience. For example, in my own DIY setup, sitting behind the kit, I use a TD-30 and place the module on a floor tom case to the left of the kit. This is the opposite side of the kit that the TD-17 cable snake is designed for; Roland assumes the module is mounted on the right side of the kit, in the air, on a rack, so the cable lengths are set for this position It is pretty much guaranteed the cables won't reach where you need, if you move the TD-17 module from its default position. Even if you do position the TD-17 as Roland intends, with actual drum shells the cable lengths may be different.

                      Therefore, for DIY using real drum shells or for setups that differ from Roland's default configurations, I recommend choosing one of Roland's modules that provide individual inputs on the back of the unit, and not a cable snake, and not bottom mounted connectors. This lets you choose your own cables and cable lengths, as needed.

                      Recommendation:
                      Ultimately, what do I recommend for your situation? TD-12, TD-20, TD-20X, or TD-30 will all do the job and provide plenty of DIY flexibility. Of those modules, only TD-30 has traditional MIDI (In and Out/Thru using 5 pin DIN connectors) and USB MIDI (MIDI over a USB port). Lots of people do fine triggering VSTs with the TD-12, TD-20, TD-20X, but if you want traditional MIDI and USB MIDI, then go with the TD-30.

                      Side Notes:
                      (1) Almost all Yamaha modules (even budget ones) provide individual inputs. However, unless you're using Yamaha pads, I don't recommend Yamaha because their modules do not support Roland-style, dual zone (pizeo / piezo) pads, which includes your Jobeky triggers

                      (2) If you've not purchased your Jobeky triggers yet, consider their side mounted trigger. With a side mounted trigger, you lose positional sensing, but you won't have hot spots in the center of the head. Myself, I'll take no hot spots over positional sensing any time!

                      (3) A significant minus for Roland cable snakes (as used in the TD-17) is the snake is sealed. Thus, if one cable in the snake goes bad, you must replace the entire snake. Using a module with individual trigger inputs avoids this problem.
                      Last edited by TangTheHump; 09-01-19, 02:32 PM.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by tivi View Post
                        yamaha pcy135 works are dual zone crash on roland module.
                        Thatís great thanks ! Just what I needed!

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by TangTheHump View Post
                          Kolling777,

                          Regarding the TD-17, while I think it's an amazing module for the price, none-the-less, it's a budget module that has poorer build quality, less triggering flexibility, and less trigger I/O as compared to Roland's more professional modules, such as TD-12, TD-20, TD-20X, TD-30, and TD-50. For a DIY kit using real drum shells, you'll appreciate features like individual trigger inputs (which allow you to use separate quarter inch cables to reach specific drums as necessary), additional MIDI mapping capabilities, and the ability to place the module wherever you wish (in the air on a cymbal stand, flat on a table, flat on a drum case, etc.).

                          The TD-17 trigger inputs are on the bottom of the module and use a single DB-25 connector. You plug a proprietary cable snake into the DB-25 and are limited by the cable lengths provided in the snake. You can add cable extenders, but this means you have joins and failure points in the middle of your cables. Plus, because the cable snake plugs into the bottom of the TD-17, you cannot place the module on a flat surface and instead must always mount the module in the air, using a cymbal stand.

                          The flexibility to place the module anywhere, such as on a flat surface, comes in very handy for DIY setups - at least this is my experience. For example, in my own DIY setup, sitting behind the kit, I use a TD-30 and place the module on a floor tom case to the left of the kit. This is the opposite side of the kit that the TD-17 cable snake is designed for; Roland assumes the module is mounted on the right side of the kit, in the air, on a rack, so the cable lengths are set for this position It is pretty much guaranteed the cables won't reach where you need, if you move the TD-17 module from its default position. Even if you do position the TD-17 as Roland intends, with actual drum shells the cable lengths may be different.

                          Therefore, for DIY using real drum shells or for setups that differ from Roland's default configurations, I recommend choosing one of Roland's modules that provide individual inputs on the back of the unit, and not a cable snake, and not bottom mounted connectors. This lets you choose your own cables and cable lengths, as needed.

                          Recommendation:
                          Ultimately, what do I recommend for your situation? TD-12, TD-20, TD-20X, or TD-30 will all do the job and provide plenty of DIY flexibility. Of those modules, only TD-30 has traditional MIDI (In and Out/Thru using 5 pin DIN connectors) and USB MIDI (MIDI over a USB port). Lots of people do fine triggering VSTs with the TD-12, TD-20, TD-20X, but if you want traditional MIDI and USB MIDI, then go with the TD-30.

                          Side Notes:
                          (1) Almost all Yamaha modules (even budget ones) provide individual inputs. However, unless you're using Yamaha pads, I don't recommend Yamaha because their modules do not support Roland-style, dual zone (pizeo / piezo) pads, which includes your Jobeky triggers

                          (2) If you've not purchased your Jobeky triggers yet, consider their side mounted trigger. With a side mounted trigger, you lose positional sensing, but you won't have hot spots in the center of the head. Myself, I'll take no hot spots over positional sensing any time!

                          (3) A significant minus for Roland cable snakes (as used in the TD-17) is the snake is sealed. Thus, if one cable in the snake goes bad, you must replace the entire snake. Using a module with individual trigger inputs avoids this problem.
                          Hey man thank you so much for putting the time to write all this info! Iíll definitely have a look at the modules you just mention, it looks like the TD17 will do the work just for now but not on the long run! Regarding the triggers, yes Iíll go side triggering,hate the hot spotting! I love the way ATM have their triggers placed, but their drums are so expensive, a shell packs costs around £1300.... with this money I can almost buy the export kit with hardware , triggers, mesh heads and a second hand module!

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                          • #14
                            Don`t make it to complicated. A TD17 will do, if you go used the TD11, TD15, TD20 will do just fine. You can always sell and upgrade later. As long as you go with ATV or Roland, even cheap stuff will work just fine and the resell value is decent.

                            Played the ATV EXS Series lately (only Pads and Module) and have to say the pads are not really better than my Snare with Jobeky Side mounted trigger. The Cymbals are amazing.
                            Pearl Forum, Sonor Snare, Drumtec Design Mesh Heads,Jobeky/ 2Box/Roland Triggers, Roland/Yamaha Cymbals: VH11, CY-12C, CY13R, PCY135, TD17 Module. Triggering AD2 and SSD5.

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                            • #15
                              Kolling777,

                              Kolling777 wrote:
                              ...it looks like the TD17 will do the work just for now, but not on the long run! (snip)
                              Yes, the TD-17 will work, absolutely. Also, if you were looking for sounds from Roland, I'd recommend the TD-17 because to my ears it is the best sounding Roland module currently on the market. Though based on the TD-50, it seems Roland improved the base samples of the TD-17.

                              Where you may find the TD-17 lacking as a full purpose module is signal routing, individual outputs (it has none), and the limited number of trigger inputs. Plus, there is the inconvenience of the cable snake and inability to place the module on a flat surface. But if the TD-17 meets your needs (which seem to be trigger to MIDI only), whether at discounted price or full price, it's a good deal. The module is well designed for its target market and target feature set. My only real concern with the TD-17 is build quality; the controls and I/O feel flimsy, but in a controlled home studio, this should not be a problem.

                              Kolling777 wrote:
                              Regarding the triggers, yes I'll go side triggering, hate the hot spotting!
                              You will not regret this decision. I use PD-128 pads for all my drums (snare, toms, and floor toms). After playing the PDX-12 with its side-mounted trigger, I'm considering converting my PDX-128 pads to side-mounted triggers. Due to the lack of hot spots, the side-mounted triggers are much more playable. I've spent hours, days, months, and now years trying to dial out hot spots. The hots spots never dial out. The side-mounted PDX-12 plays better out of the box than any of my center-mounted triggers; it's a night versus day improvement.
                              Last edited by TangTheHump; 09-02-19, 04:10 PM.

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