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Snare Snafoo

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  • Snare Snafoo

    So now I've gotten farmiliar with the TD-10. My V-Pro is the new bike on the block. I've formed a cover band and we're traveling all over the place. And I've built, mixed, EQ'd, panned, and played with the "tight" kit. Picked out the cymbals and tuned everything just right. We bought our selves a PA system and we have it all worked out.

    That's when I took a listen to the playback. My snare is so cheap. UGH! It sounded so good through my monitor! But its very 'casio keyboard from the late 80's' sound. Very stale and sampled sounding. It's number 88-Piccolo35. It's my favorite snare -- with the TDW-1 upgrade included.

    Our band plays cover music very similar to Dave Matthews Band. There really is no better description to the type of music better than 'dave music.' So anyway, with Carter Beauford being my idol, I'd love to have a kit similar sounding to his. Especially his snare. It has a marching band sound to it. I can't seem to get a snare on the TD-10 to sound any better than a sampled drum with the pitch bend way up. AHHH! Doesn't sound good!

    So if there's anyone out there who can give me a snare that you've found to sound somewhat like what I'm looking for?!

    There's one more thing I must ask you while I'm at it. Since I move my V-Pro around locally about once a week, will I be having problems with the rack or parts failing that I might need to replace? Any advice is GREATLY appreciated! Oh by the way, just as a side note, somehow I received the concert set stad with my V-pro, and from what I know, it had better engineering put into the building of it, and it is much stronger than the V-pro stand. Just a note.

    Thanks a bunch guys, Andy
    The best damn kid in the record industry. Maybe.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Algee:
    will I be having problems with the rack or parts failing that I might need to replace
    Andy, it is a good idea to always carry some spare parts if you are gigging regularly. A couple of spare clamps, a couple of spare bolts and a spare cymbal/tom arm are vital for your own peace of mind.
    and a big roll of 'gaffers' tape.

    As far as a snare goes. Try selecting your snare sound while using your front of house speakers as the reference point. This will ensure that the sound you want is the sound that the audience hears.
    As for me, I use an acoustic snare.
    Steve

    'I only ever quote myself - except when I quote someone else' - me

    , plenty of , and , , triggered acoustics, , and a plethora of PA blah blah freakin blah...I mean does anyone care about the specifics of pedals, speakers, processors, hardware or anything that I'm using?? :confused: Hmmm, maybe this is an appropriate place to mention that I tried out a new cymbal stand the other day...

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    • #3
      Rob...any suggestions?



      Erik

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      • #4
        Maybe you could get your sound person to set you up early and take your snare and module out in front of the PA, plug it into the mixing board and adjust the sound while you are sitting where the audience would be. I've never tried that, but it sounds so radical, I might give it a try at our next gig with my whole kit set up out front before I move it onto the stage. I'm almost hyper-ventilating just thinking about it.

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        • #5
          I am a fan of marching band snares, too. Even grow up there.

          When I had the TD-10 I always choose one of the piccolo snare, changed the shell to bronze and the head to coated. I had the snare strainer on Loose; certainly not tight.

          Then I noticed that the piccolo snare sounded too thin. What I did was not selecting a deeper snare but I changed the shell size of that piccolo to 8-inch or so. Still had a sharp marching band snare attack buy doing this and some body.


          posted by Steveo the Devo
          Try selecting your snare sound while using your front of house speakers as the reference point. This will ensure that the sound you want is the sound that the audience hears.


          Ehhh??? There can be a large difference between the things I (want to) hear and what the audience hears. And what about the monitoring vs FOH? Just 2 different worlds.
          Robert

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          • #6
            Originally posted by puttenvr:
            Ehhh??? There can be a large difference between the things I (want to) hear and what the audience hears. And what about the monitoring vs FOH? Just 2 different worlds.
            Yep, good point. It seems to me that Algee is unhappy with the FOH sound although he seems happy with his monitoring sound. My suggestion was (as so eloquently stated by Bagman) to do the tweaking of his kit while sitting in the audience position. Sure it will mean sacrificing his monitor sound but his major stress seems to being getting that Dave Matthews snare thing across to the audience.
            Using the sequencer on board the TD-10 he could also put a drum loop on and review the sound from the FOH as the band plays along.
            Steve

            'I only ever quote myself - except when I quote someone else' - me

            , plenty of , and , , triggered acoustics, , and a plethora of PA blah blah freakin blah...I mean does anyone care about the specifics of pedals, speakers, processors, hardware or anything that I'm using?? :confused: Hmmm, maybe this is an appropriate place to mention that I tried out a new cymbal stand the other day...

            Comment


            • #7
              Okay, understand it.

              For me the problem still is: a sequencer give other (more fine) trigger signals then a strike on the drumpads (noise from the piezo then is added). Same problem when you ask a guitar player to play on your drums, so that you can listen to the FOH mix. He plays different than I do (less loud).

              And: testing the drums separately (also in an empty room) is always different than with the entire band and the audience which fills the room. You can have a killer snare sound which disappears when the guitars, keyboards and vocals are playing and the room is filled with audience.

              Nevertheless: testing the drum sound in the way you describe may be a starting point. Better to have something than to have nothing. The other advice: be friends with the soundengineer. He can make and break a sound.
              Robert

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              • #8
                Thanks guys. I'm going to take the advice to change to brass and coated. That would help greatly! And for the rest of you...THANK YOU!! That's an awesome idea. 'm going to set up in the audience's place and play. Thanks guys once again for your help!
                The best damn kid in the record industry. Maybe.

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