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May need your kindly suggesting.

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  • May need your kindly suggesting.

    Hello everyone. My name is Bruce , business representative of a new Edrum company. We plan to have our local branch and establish our after-sales service system in the US. However there are already lots of awesome brands in the market such as Roland , Yamaha , Alesis , KAT , Pintech …etc . So base on the situation, I still may need your precious opinion for below questions: .(Please always reply me even you are not in the US, we need all of your professional advisement.)
    1. In what reason , you would like to pick up a brand that is not well known or even was not been heard before when you are going to buy a e-drum set?
    2. What kind of feature bias you to choose the E-drum model when you are going to buy a e-drum set. (e.g. price , outward , brand , quality , special function , physical punch feeling , sound , (multiple options))?
    3. Regrading to the mature edrum market and with some existing strong brands like Roland , Yamaha , Alesis …etc. What kind of feature that you will suggest us to have to survive in this market?
    4. Any other recommendations?

    We so appreciate for your kindly feedback and also you could email me or pm me if you are interested in our brand.
    Thank you so much and have a wonderful day.


  • #2
    1. Price / features (I buy all sorts of things to play - I'll buy most things if they're interesting)
    2. MIDI IN.
    3. Sample loading, MIDI IN. 3-zone pads. MIDI sequencer. Reasonable portability.

    Don't care what it looks like.
    Last edited by electrodrummer; 03-15-19, 06:12 PM.
    *** Never buy a module without MIDI IN ***
    Yamaha & Roland modules. DTX,TM-2, EC-10m, SP-404. Multi12. TrapKat. ControlPad. Wavedrum. Handsonic. Dynacord RhythmStick. MPC. Paiste 2002/Signatures. Cajons. Djembes. Darbuka. Windsynth. MIDI Bass. Tenori-on. Zoom ARQ. Loads o' synth modules. & some ukes

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    • #3
      Originally posted by electrodrummer View Post
      1. Price / features (I buy all sorts of things to play - I'll buy most things if they're interesting)
      2. MIDI IN.
      3. Sample loading, MIDI IN. 3-zone pads. MIDI sequencer. Reasonable portability.

      Don't care what it looks like.
      Yamaha have mostly these .. IF, yamaha combine with Pearl Mimic Pro that would be ... PERFECT

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      • #4
        Originally posted by tivi View Post

        Yamaha have mostly these .. IF, yamaha combine with Pearl Mimic Pro that would be ... PERFECT
        Agree , highly recommend the Mimic pro but the price.....

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        • #5
          Originally posted by electrodrummer View Post
          1. Price / features (I buy all sorts of things to play - I'll buy most things if they're interesting)
          2. MIDI IN.
          3. Sample loading, MIDI IN. 3-zone pads. MIDI sequencer. Reasonable portability.

          Don't care what it looks like.
          How about the metal e-cymbal?

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          • #6
            For me an edrum module would probably be like a 2box but with more trigger inputs and large memory space. The big thing is the ability to use other manufacturers pads and the hi hats. Not forgetting midi in and out. I would also want a usb interface that can transmit and receive midi. Others may want it to be an audio interface as well but I don’t need that.
            Roland TD30 module on TD20 kit SD3 with various kits. Pearl Masters Kit, Yamaha 9000RC original natural wood finish. Cymbals from Zildgian Pasite and Sabian. Loads of percussion bits. Cubase and Wavelab always current versions.

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            • #7
              1. A large enough feature set and a set of good, thorough demonstration videos of the performance. So a good quality capture that is filmed preferably in a way that doesn't imply heavy editing of the footage or audio, demonstrating its triggering capabilities and a walkthrough of the module, ideally. This would help instill confidence in a newcomer to the market.

              2. The sounds and playability are obviously important to me, but a module that has a high level of flexibility will help push it over the edge when buying. So a good array of inputs and outputs, preferably with comprehensive routing options, and all the usual midi in/out options are a must. If there's a song player on board, the ability to incorporate this into the routing alongside the drum sounds. So far the TD-50 accomplishes a decent amount of what I want in this area, but falls short on some weird limitations that weren't thought through, so I would very quickly jump to another kit/module that accomplishes these things.

              3. As close as possible to full pad compatibility across all brands would definitely help. A few modules are now doing this so I feel like that should really be a benchmark by this point. If people are wanting to buy a module instead of a full kit and this option is provided, then they're not going to want to swap out all of their pads unless there's a very good reason to.

              4. I could list off things for hours, so I'll just leave one last recommendation instead - VST quality sounds should really be what is strived for now. I mean this in terms of high numbers of layers/round robins, ability to tweak mic/drum mix and preferably a decent amount of memory and good load speeds alongside those. So far, we have one module that provides this out of the box and two that come close but also allow the imports of such sounds with varying degrees of tweaking available. If you want to survive in this relatively niche market but don't only want to attract new players/people who only buy e-drums out of necessity, I feel this would give a rather large leg up against the current options.
              Last edited by Pulsc; 03-16-19, 04:34 PM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by cooldoglovegod View Post

                How about the metal e-cymbal?
                It is trendy around here lately.

                It depends. If you are going for entry level, then rubber because it will mostly be for young people or even kids to hit drum pads but make less noise.

                If you are going for a more "pro" kit, the low volume cymbals are much more interesting in terms of feel when hitting them. I personally do not like the way rubber cymbals grab my sticks, and would prefer a metal e-cymbal.
                DTX700, A2E Dixon kit, Yamaha cymbals, FSR HH Kit Pix

                My new venture: voglosounds.com

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