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ATV EXS (new Edrum/modul)

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  • #46
    The new ATV EXS kits are already listed, different sizes, not many details on the module yet though:
    https://www.drum-tec.com/atv-exs-5-full-size-e-drums

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    • #47
      I need to buying Edrum this year... I Will probably buying the new ATV EXS-4 because sounds of ATV EXS-4 are the same of aD5 and just sounds very good and not twoo expensiv (or the new Edrum from Pearl If the prestation have good quality/price)
      I only that sounds of ATV EXS are the same of the AD5 (with improprement like metonome and onboard songs for practicing)
      from Drum-tec web site:

      The ATV EXS series is the second generation of electronic drums from Japanese manufacturer ATV, founded by Roland founder Kakehashi.

      ATV started with the aD5 e-drum module in 2016 and followed up with the aDrums, an e-drums solution in acoustic look and feel in 2017. Now, in the middle of 2018 they have introduced the new EXS series which features a reduced version of the aD5, the new ATV xD3 sound module. There will be multiple sets from the EXS series, starting with the EXS-1 all the way up to the EXS-5, each with different feature sets and price points.

      The new ATV xD3 module is based on the sound engine of the well-known aD5 module. The triggers of all the pads and cymbals from the new EXS series are also based on ATVs established high-end technology - Made in Japan.

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      • #48
        How can a new module be anymore basic then the ad5 which is about as bare bones as it gets.

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        • #49
          Originally posted by TangTheHump View Post

          The 13 inch size is more inviting, for sure. But, why do e-drum companies muck up such a simple thing? Go into a drum shop and sit down behind some acoustic kits. What are the sizes? Drum sizes: 10, 12, 14, 16, and 18. Throw in a 13, too, because that is also a common size. Cymbals: 14 hi-hat, 16 and 18 crash cymbals, 20 and 22 rides. Done! If the e-drum companies did this, they'd remove a huge barrier to acceptance.
          I agree 100%
          ATV AD5 module,vh11, cy15r, cy13c/r,pearl P-932 demonator pedals,pearl export drum shells with roland mesh heads,pearl dr80 rack, rt30 triggers on toms and bass drum and rt10 on snare

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          • #50
            Originally posted by TangTheHump View Post

            The 13 inch size is more inviting, for sure. But, why do e-drum companies muck up such a simple thing? Go into a drum shop and sit down behind some acoustic kits. What are the sizes? Drum sizes: 10, 12, 14, 16, and 18. Throw in a 13, too, because that is also a common size. Cymbals: 14 hi-hat, 16 and 18 crash cymbals, 20 and 22 rides. Done! If the e-drum companies did this, they'd remove a huge barrier to acceptance.
            The reason why you donít see those sizes is because of cost. Larger e-drum shells equals increased material cost, larger packaging and higher freight costs. You yourself have complained in other threads that e-drum kits are too expensive. It is just not possible to lower ekit prices and make the drums larger.

            Second, what purpose would a 16Ē e-floor drum serve? In an e-kit you donít need larger shells to produce lower tones, it would just be for looks and not about improving playability. When playing an acoustic floor tom you should be hitting within 6Ē to 8Ē of the center to produce the best tone. Yes, there may be some drummers out there that may be swayed by larger sizes but I donít think the demand is as large as you think. When I sold drums the main reasons people wanted to buy an e-kit was because of noise and space issues. Where I live we donít have basements so space is at a premium. When the Pearl e-pro kits first came out we gave it a shot but in the end customers didnít want to make room for the larger shells.

            Regarding the cymbals, I agree with you that the larger sizes are more appealing although a 22Ē ride may be over kill. I have the Roland 18Ē digital ride and I am quite happy with the size. I donít know if a 20Ē would make that big of a difference for me.
            TD-50KV, Superior Drummer 3.0, Roland SPD-SX, DW Hardware

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            • #51
              Larger sizes lead to increased scanning time, since the fundamental pitch is lower, even if you pitch up the head.
              MarkDrum YES e-kit (+1 crash, Double Kick), modified HH (DIY hall-sensor based circuit)
              Gibraltar 9607NL-DP Legless Hi Hat
              Gibraltar Intruder Double Pedal
              ATH-M40fs + M40x + SRH440 Phones

              Comment


              • #52
                Chance27,

                The reason why you donít see those sizes is because of cost. Larger e-drum shells equals increased material cost, larger packaging, and higher freight costs. You yourself have complained in other threads that e-drum kits are too expensive. It is just not possible to lower e-kit prices and make the drums larger.
                Drum shells are typically one of the least expensive components in a drum kit. The difference in cost between a 10 inch shell and a 16 inch shell is negligible, because it takes the same tooling and process for either one. And with e-drums, you don't need deep shells, so you can make more drums from one shell, subdividing that shell into shallower depths. I don't think drum sizes are the issue, especially if you get shells from a high-volume manufacturer and use off-the-shelf components. Now, if you build custom shells using proprietary hardware, and do so in small quantity, then your cost is likely to go up considerably. E-drum manufacturers are often doing exactly this, making proprietary stuff in small quantities. I think the costs could be changed dramatically, if e-drum manufacturers re-thought how they source and build their pads.

                What purpose would a 16Ē e-floor drum serve?
                What purpose do acoustic sizes serve on an e-kit? Playability and compatibility with acoustic drums. The larger playing surface allows using more drumming techniques and facilitates certain ratios for rim shots. When switching between acoustic and electronic drums, having identical sizes on both kits makes the switchover much easier. Myself, I use brushes at least fifty percent of the time. The smallest size I typically use with brushes is 14 inch diameter. Reducing this size limits sweep room, which isn't desirable, especially when performing sweeping motions on the same drum with both hands.

                When playing an acoustic floor tom you should be hitting within 6Ē to 8Ē of the center to produce the best tone.
                I play the entire head, because there are sound and technique variations that occur using different parts of the head. Also, different drumming techniques (such as singles versus doubles) feel more appropriate and are more consistent in different areas of the head. Slow singles at triple forte? I play those in the center. Fast doubles at triple pianissimo? I play those nearer the edge, away from center, regardless of whether playing acoustic or electronic drums.

                Yes, there may be some drummers out there that may be swayed by larger sizes, but I donít think the demand is as large as you think.
                I think we need to delineate between drummers who play e-drums exclusively versus drummers who play both acoustic and electronic drums. Every drummer I know that plays both mentions the small sizes of e-drums as a significant problem.

                When I sold drums the main reasons people wanted to buy an e-kit was because of noise and space issues.
                Quiet practice is a key reason for e-drum sales, yes. That's my own reason for e-drums and it's a key reason I hear from many drummers. The space issue seems like a bit of a red herring, though I've seen this marketed quite a bit. A small acoustic kit (14 SD, 12 RT, 14 FT, 18 BD) takes identical space to a small e-kit. In fact, a small e-kit often takes more space, once you account for the rack, wires, module, and any additional components, such as a headphone amplifier. My small acoustic and electronic kits take identical space, but the acoustic kit is much more easily scaleable because all the drums stand on their own and there are no wires.

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                • #53
                  Originally posted by sascha View Post
                  Larger sizes lead to increased scanning time, since the fundamental pitch is lower, even if you pitch up the head.
                  This doesn't seem to be much of a problem for e-drums. I've played larger sizes (14, 16, 20, and 22) and they trigger fine.

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Originally posted by TangTheHump View Post
                    Chance27,



                    Drum shells are typically one of the least expensive components in a drum kit. The difference in cost between a 10 inch shell and a 16 inch shell is negligible, because it takes the same tooling and process for either one. And with e-drums, you don't need deep shells, so you can make more drums from one shell, subdividing that shell into shallower depths. I don't think drum sizes are the issue, especially if you get shells from a high-volume manufacturer and use off-the-shelf components. Now, if you build custom shells using proprietary hardware, and do so in small quantity, then your cost is likely to go up considerably. E-drum manufacturers are often doing exactly this, making proprietary stuff in small quantities. I think the costs could be changed dramatically, if e-drum manufacturers re-thought how they source and build their pads.



                    What purpose do acoustic sizes serve on an e-kit? Playability and compatibility with acoustic drums. The larger playing surface allows using more drumming techniques and facilitates certain ratios for rim shots. When switching between acoustic and electronic drums, having identical sizes on both kits makes the switchover much easier. Myself, I use brushes at least fifty percent of the time. The smallest size I typically use with brushes is 14 inch diameter. Reducing this size limits sweep room, which isn't desirable, especially when performing sweeping motions on the same drum with both hands.



                    I play the entire head, because there are sound and technique variations that occur using different parts of the head. Also, different drumming techniques (such as singles versus doubles) feel more appropriate and are more consistent in different areas of the head. Slow singles at triple forte? I play those in the center. Fast doubles at triple pianissimo? I play those nearer the edge, away from center, regardless of whether playing acoustic or electronic drums.



                    I think we need to delineate between drummers who play e-drums exclusively versus drummers who play both acoustic and electronic drums. Every drummer I know that plays both mentions the small sizes of e-drums as a significant problem.



                    Quiet practice is a key reason for e-drum sales, yes. That's my own reason for e-drums and it's a key reason I hear from many drummers. The space issue seems like a bit of a red herring, though I've seen this marketed quite a bit. A small acoustic kit (14 SD, 12 RT, 14 FT, 18 BD) takes identical space to a small e-kit. In fact, a small e-kit often takes more space, once you account for the rack, wires, module, and any additional components, such as a headphone amplifier. My small acoustic and electronic kits take identical space, but the acoustic kit is much more easily scaleable because all the drums stand on their own and there are no wires.
                    I guess we just have a diifference in philosophy. For me, I have always viewed an e-kit as another tool in the box. I have never expected it to replace or be exactly like my acoustic kit. I enjoy my Roland kit for what it is and for all the things it can do that my acoustic kit canít. Even with acoustic kits, playing a 7pc kit vs a 4pc jazz kit I am going to approach and play the kits differently. It is not a conscious decison, itís just an instinctive thing that happens when I sit down behind the kit. For me, this is what makes playing drums fun and challenging.
                    TD-50KV, Superior Drummer 3.0, Roland SPD-SX, DW Hardware

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Originally posted by TangTheHump View Post

                      This doesn't seem to be much of a problem for e-drums. I've played larger sizes (14, 16, 20, and 22) and they trigger fine.
                      As an engineer I don't much rely on what 'seems', I'd rather rely on what I can calculate doing applied physics and what I can see on the scope and meter readouts afterwards.
                      Plus, some multi-piezo techniques using time delta /TDOA algorithms have tracking issues with larger sizes and simple through-zero tracking, thus might need more processing power for stuff like, say, autocorrelation.
                      MarkDrum YES e-kit (+1 crash, Double Kick), modified HH (DIY hall-sensor based circuit)
                      Gibraltar 9607NL-DP Legless Hi Hat
                      Gibraltar Intruder Double Pedal
                      ATH-M40fs + M40x + SRH440 Phones

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Chance27 wrote:
                        I guess we just have a difference in philosophy. For me, I have always viewed an e-kit as another tool in the box. I have never expected it to replace or be exactly like my acoustic kit.
                        When I started looking at e-drums, it was precisely due to the need for quiet drum practice. Also, I was interested to see if I could use e-drums in addition to (or instead of) acoustic drums. Ultimately, in their current state, electronic drums haven't worked out well for the gigs I do. I still use electronic drums for certain kinds of practice and teaching, and I'm looking forward to the day when e-drums become more mature and organic, where what comes out is as expressive as what one plays in.

                        Another factor that will make e-drums much more workable is when they become wireless and self-amplified. At small gigs, there is often limited power and no suitable PA. With acoustic drums, I set up and play. With electronic drums, I have to bring my own PA and muck around with wiring and power, all of which hugely increases the amount of work I must do. However, when / if e-drums become wireless and self-amplified (imagine a lightweight class D amplifier and lightweight neodymium speakers built into the bass drum), then they might become an option. Set up. One power cable. Play!

                        Sascha wrote:
                        As an engineer, I don't much rely on what 'seems'. I'd rather rely on what I can calculate doing applied physics and what I can see on the scope and meter readouts afterwards.
                        From an engineering perspective, there may well be significant differences allowing for better detection and optimization, but musically that's not how I perceive the various sizes. Indeed, musically, I prefer the larger sizes, because they allow me to focus on the music rather than on mechanical targeting of small areas. Time delta / TDOA / FDOA algorithms aren't really what I think about when my mind is in music creation mode, and I believe that's as it should be. If I reach over to play a floor tom note and miss because the pad is 6 inches smaller than I expect, that's a problem, regardless of how well the smaller pad may trigger!
                        Last edited by TangTheHump; 04-17-18, 01:53 PM.

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                        • #57
                          My 14 inch snare with drone trigger plays as good or better than the PD125. It is better in that I don't really have hotspot issues. The new DW shells with 8 arm triggers are similar to mine. I added an internal damper to my snare to take the bounce out of the head. The response is very close to acoustic. I have around $300 into the snare and $1200 into the kick and toms.
                          I would like to see what this new kit would sell for as pads only. The module appears limited to mono or stereo channel and room channel so it would be a downgrade for me from the Mimic.

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                          • #58
                            On another note,this EXS kit plays great. I played it at NAMM and it is on par with the full Adrum kit.

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                            • #59
                              Well ATV release a new 12" hihat ,12" crash, 14" ride smaller cymbal and smaller kits, I believe the lower module don't have sd cards, you cannot load any sound into the module, you are limited from the module sound included.


                              https://www.drum-tec.de/atv-exs-5-full-sized-e-drum-set
                              https://www.drum-tec.de/atv-exs-4-advanced-e-drum-set
                              https://www.drum-tec.de/atv-exs-3-kompaktes-e-drum-set
                              Last edited by Chris K; 04-19-18, 06:32 PM.

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                              • #60
                                Chris K wrote:
                                Well ATV release a new 12" hihat ,12" crash, 14" ride smaller cymbal and smaller kits... (snip)
                                I'm disappointed to see ATV headed in this direction. The e-drum world doesn't need more small, toy-like cymbals. And, on the smallest kit (EXS-3), they've fallen even more into generic e-drum territory, with all 10 inch drum sizes and small cymbals too. Very uninspiring.

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