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Quiet high hat?

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  • szvook
    replied
    Originally posted by Nate:
    I was referring to the Ecymbal X series, and the dual zone ride in particular. I would go so far as to say it had an acrylic surface. VERY unforgiving.

    Haven't played the metal Harts...
    Oh....sorry. My bad, you did mention that in the post before.



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    szvook

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  • Nate
    replied
    I was referring to the Ecymbal X series, and the dual zone ride in particular. I would go so far as to say it had an acrylic surface. VERY unforgiving.

    Haven't played the metal Harts...

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  • szvook
    replied
    Originally posted by snared:
    I don't think the ride or high hats need any cym springs because they are excactly what you would be playing if you were playing accoustics, anyway.

    I completely agree snared. Although if Nate is having some issues with the density, some movement can be obtained to lessen the numbness effect, which I find to be a bit unusual form the metal surface(s).

    Nate, are you sure?



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    szvook

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  • snared
    replied
    I agree szvook! The Hart Ecymbal II's are dense, hard, metal whatever, but thats the point. They are supposed to duplicate the feel of real cyms as much as possible (and they do a great job). Thats why the high hat and ride are metal, and the crashes have cym springs. I don't think the ride or high hats need any cym springs because they are excactly what you would be playing if you were playing accoustics, anyway. They feel like what they are duplicating because they are what they are duplicating, metal cymbals, just quieter. The crashes do need a little help because they are just thin plastic, so they get cym springs. I think they feel pretty close to real, too. As far as pain or discomfort, I haven't been using them as long as szvook has but they don't bother me at all either.

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  • szvook
    replied
    Originally posted by Nate:
    The other Harts are very dense and make a LOT of noise when played. The rubber on the playable section is quite thin, and the ecymbals themselves are quite inflexible, which caused me a bit of numbness when playing for extended periods.

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  • Nate
    replied
    -Has anyone tried the other Hart ecymbals. The ones that are just plastic triangles with rubber? Are they quiet?

    The other Harts are very dense and make a LOT of noise when played. The rubber on the playable section is quite thin, and the ecymbals themselves are quite inflexible, which caused me a bit of numbness when playing for extended periods.

    I like the PD7s for hats.

    Leave a comment:


  • clymore
    replied
    Originally posted by snared:
    Has anyone used the Roland PD pads and the Yamaha (triangle) cymbal pads? Can anyone compare them for me? Which has better feel, quieter opperation, etc. I'm leaning towards the Yamaha because they are cheaper, but I want to get as close as possible to the real feel of my Ecymbal II's. I plan on using the rubber pads for home quiet play, and resume using the Hart's at other times.
    I have a Roland TD-8 set and my church has an Alesis DMPro set. I use Yamaha PCY80 & PCY80S cymbals on both. They are quiet, very senstitve and chokable (in the "S" model). I also have a PCY60 I use as a hi-hat. I put extra felt and a big washer to really clamp it down tight to feel like a real hi-hat. It works great. I hated the cymbals that came with the DMPro set!!!

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  • barrybonzo
    replied
    I use a cy-6 for the highhat. works super.

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  • Boingo
    replied
    I had this tucked away and happened to stumble upon it. They have quite a few products to take care of vibration, noise or both. You can't put it on your hats but you could use it in a riser, on walls, etc.

    At work, we used a 2" thick foam to quiet a high speed blower which sounded like a jet engine. We glued it to a plywood frame which surrounded the blower on 3 sides. We can now have conversations in a normal tone standing 3 ft from it. It's amazing. It's also not cheap.
    http://www.800nonoise.com/dbproducts.htm

    Leave a comment:


  • snared
    replied
    I think I'm going to try putting something on the cymbals. Maybe a towel or some foam rubber. I'll see if it works and let you guys know, if you're interested. Though, it seems that only people who have the Hart ecymbal II's in they're appartment have that problem.

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  • szvook
    replied
    Maybe someone should design a mesh hat and eliminate the noise factor......

    ------------------
    szvook

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  • Boingo
    replied
    http://www.vdrums.com/discussion/For...ML/000516.html
    http://www.vdrums.com/discussion/For...ML/000077.html
    http://www.vdrums.com/discussion/For...ML/000431.html
    http://www.vdrums.com/discussion/For...ML/000052.html
    http://www.vdrums.com/discussion/For...ML/000589.html

    Leave a comment:


  • snared
    replied
    Thanx for the input, drmoze. I am still considering that alternative. Or possibly making a pad myself. Has anyone tried the other Hart ecymbals. The ones that are just plastic triangles with rubber? Are they quiet?

    Leave a comment:


  • drmoze
    replied
    OK, if no one else will answer your question, here goes: The Roland PD-7 has a good feel for a hi-hat IMO, and is what I generally use. It isn't very quiet, though. I can't compare it directly with your Hart pad, but I find the PD-7 very comfortable with good feel. (It doesns't really have any "give" to it, though.)

    I use a Yamaha PCY80S for my ride. I did try it as a hihat too, and liked it. Much quieter than the Roland pad, and it does flex a bit, very similar in degree to a real hihat. And it's cheap!

    Both the Roland and Yammie pads are very reliable, triggering faultlessly from both pad & rim. Rims are great on a hihat pad--I use the tambourine hh on a few kits, which give nice HH flexibility with pedal up and down.

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  • snared
    replied
    What key words do you suggest to use? I tried riser, couldn't find very much so far.

    Leave a comment:

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