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Bronze V-Cymbals?

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  • Bronze V-Cymbals?

    Has anybody considered painting their V-Cymbals bronze? No I haven't done it but I was wondering if it would work and if anybody else has considered it. It may give a more realistic look for those who are concerned about the looks thing.

    Any thoughts on this?
    Denver, CO
    Vpro Drummer

  • #2
    Hart dynamics does thier e-cymbal 2's like that,but you can't just paint them.It's some kind of a process that they have to do.

    FYI,for those of you who would like them,I talked to one of the guys at hart.He said if we wanted black cymbals,let them know.They would do it .If you wanted to add a splash or something.
    c-ya
    Todd

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    • #3
      I don't see why you can't paint them. Perhaps not where you'll be striking them, but certainly the back (audience side) could be painted (swirly multi-colours with UV paint over the top perhaps??) It shouldn't have any effect at all on the triggering. Even painting the struck side shouldn't do very much unless you use a particularly thick coat of paint, but even so...

      If you want a really cheap way to find out if it'll work, you could buy a Pintech TC cymbal (the cheapest e-cymbals I know of) and try it on that. Of course they're nothing like the V-Cymbals, but it'd give you an idea...

      Anyway, happy experimenting. I might even give it a try myself (I've got Pintech TC cymbals myself, so it wouldn't be too much of a loss!)

      Schmunk

      ------------------
      TD-8, Pintech pads, Pearl rack, PM-3, Behringer 802 mixer and DSP1400 UltraMizer
      TD-8, Pintech pads, Pearl rack, Mackie SRM-450, Behringer 802 mixer and DSP1400 UltraMizer, Electric Sticks.

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      • #4
        The V's are rubber, Hart and Pintech are plastic. You can't practice painting plastic and then paint rubber and expect the same results. Paint the rubber rim to test. It will cost $20 to replace. I would try automotive "rubber bumper" paint as it should stick.

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        • #5
          If you want a really cheap way to find out if it'll work, you could buy a Pintech TC [/B]
          The TC is a hard plastic and probably could be prepped and painted -especially since you hit the leather pad part anyway. The V's are covered in a VERY soft tire tread-like material(and smell like it too). I doubt the paint would last a day or two on V's. Maybe Roland will offer a whitewall (goldwall?) steel belted radial - prorated for 40,000 gigs

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          • #6
            Oh yeah, I forgot that.

            You could prime the cymbals first with "rubber bumper" paint or similar and then you could use any paint you wanted to get other effects

            Schmunk

            ------------------
            TD-8, Pintech pads, Pearl rack, PM-3, Behringer 802 mixer and DSP1400 UltraMizer
            TD-8, Pintech pads, Pearl rack, Mackie SRM-450, Behringer 802 mixer and DSP1400 UltraMizer, Electric Sticks.

            Comment


            • #7
              I think I'm going to try this paint idea. I found a Krylon primer which says it will work on plastic and rubber. On top of the primer I am going to use a Krylon Metallic Brass paint. I will try it on one of my CY-8s and then post back (with pictures) after it's done. I have to wait till the humidity drops as the paint says not to use it in high humidity.
              Kit: Roland V-Tour (USA) with TD-6V, Pintech Piccolo Snare, Pintech CC Floor Tom, Roland PD80R + PD80 for Toms. Smartrigger Crash Cymbal, CY-8 Ride, CY-8 as a Hi-Hat.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by JiMEE
                I think I'm going to try this paint idea. I found a Krylon primer which says it will work on plastic and rubber. On top of the primer I am going to use a Krylon Metallic Brass paint. I will try it on one of my CY-8s and then post back (with pictures) after it's done. I have to wait till the humidity drops as the paint says not to use it in high humidity.
                Dunno JiMEE.... that could be a pretty "Flakey" idea... Jman
                I could tell you where to stick that piezo! ;)
                Stealthdrums.com Mega Kit: Pearl Mimic Pro ,2Box modules,drums and cymbals too many to count. VST quality sounds directly from the Mimic and custom sounds loaded into and played directly from the 2Box modules. Visit me anytime at: http://stealthdrums.com/

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                • #9
                  Do you think the paint will "flake" off? I'm kind of worried about that too. The primer is a reddish brown color, so if the Brass paint wears off at the stick contact point, it won't look too bad.

                  Have you had any experience or know of anyone who painted their cymbals?
                  Kit: Roland V-Tour (USA) with TD-6V, Pintech Piccolo Snare, Pintech CC Floor Tom, Roland PD80R + PD80 for Toms. Smartrigger Crash Cymbal, CY-8 Ride, CY-8 as a Hi-Hat.

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                  • #10
                    If it flakes off of the polymer Harts, I can't imagine it wouldn't flake off rubber Rolands. Not to be pessimistic... just looking out for ya.

                    Can't hurt to try I suppose. Well, it could be well messy, a'ight?
                    Booyakasha!
                    analog missionary

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                    • #11
                      I've been thinking about this since Krylon came out with their new spray paint for plastic surfaces. I'm thinking of just painting the bottoms of a couple of CY-8s and the bottom of a ZB-2. I think you'd just have to tape off the rubber part at the rim and the trigger housing and paint the plastic. I wouldn't paint the tops, since most of the surface is rubber, but I suppose you could paint the plastic portion to the rear of the CY-8s. I don't see why you'd have issues with flaking if you don't paint the striking area. Now that I've got a couple of spare CY-6s, I think I'll start with those and see how it looks, then maybe move to the CY-8s and Zenbal.

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                      • #12
                        The down and dirty on paints

                        Plastic paints are not really that new. The automotive industry has been using plastic primers to paint bumper bars etc for years.

                        The reason that you need a plastic primer is that plastic is flexible, therefore a normal paint will chip or flake off as the plastic flexes. By using a plastic primer or paint for plastic surfaces you can get around this problem.

                        However, thatbeing said, this is a non-reversible decision that you make. The plastic primer sort of acts like an aluminium etch primer in that it 'holds on' to the plastic by 'eating into it' (not enough to be noticable). Therefore there is no 'sanding' it off and going back to the normal plastic.

                        By using a plastic paint or a plastic primer and 'other paint' you shouldn't get any flaking BUT you are likely to get chipping on any struck surface - as you would expect when you hit any painted surface with a stick for repeated periods of time. Therefore, you will have to reapply the paint in these areas.

                        One other peice of advice (from several years in the automotive industry) - use lots of very light coats rather than one thick coat. Otherwise you will get what is called 'orange peel on the paint (not good). Oh yeah, and soak your spray cans in a bath of hot water before you use them, it helps prevent splattering.

                        Good luck!
                        Steve

                        'I only ever quote myself - except when I quote someone else' - me

                        , plenty of , and , , triggered acoustics, , and a plethora of PA blah blah freakin blah...I mean does anyone care about the specifics of pedals, speakers, processors, hardware or anything that I'm using?? :confused: Hmmm, maybe this is an appropriate place to mention that I tried out a new cymbal stand the other day...

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                        • #13
                          Thanks for the tips. I decided to go with a plastic primer and gold metallic paint (the brass and copper metallics just didn't look right to me - gold came the closest to what I wanted and seemed flashier). I've started on a CY-6 and if that turns out well, I'll move on to the CY-8s. I'm taking a few pictures as I go along and if anyone's interested I'll post them.

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                          • #14
                            Well, it took about 2 and half hours to do the CY-6. Looks pretty good, so I'll do the CY-8s and the Zenbal later this week. Here's a shot of the painted one and a regular one side-by-side:
                            Attached Files

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by bjb5150 or Harts....
                              (Realizing and understanding the ), I seriously agree...but it WOULD be nice to have the APPEARANCE (especially the "stage presence") of the Harts - WITHOUT the associated "THWACK".

                              I recall when we discussed a similar subject around the beginning of the year.

                              My input was to have an ecymbal that had the quieter strike, but the "flash" and overall appearance of a regular cymbal. I couldn't understand why Roland, Pintech, etc hadn't tried this with a shiny gold-tone application on their "softer" ecymbals - stating even if just on the bottom where it is more audience-visible (as Feefer also stated in his above thread).

                              Why the plain white on the bottom of the Roland ecymbal, when it would probably be a small task to apply a traditional-appearing finish; especially where the cymbal receives no direct contact?

                              If the current projects in this thread are successful, it should be a message
                              for all manufacturers. Excluding the zone differences: Roland, Pintech, etc could market the appearance yet quieter play as a plus. Hart could "feel the heat", as one of it's often-desired features is the appearance.

                              Hmmm, let's see, quieter but more realistic look - the best of both worlds.
                              Hart Pro 6.4 (Hammered Chrome), Roland TD-8, Gibraltar Throne w/ Backrest, Tama Iron Cobra Bass Pedal, ALTEC A7-500 "Voice of the Theatre" Speaker/Horn System with Sunn Concert Slave amp and lot of other audio stuff, Sony MDR-7506 Headphones, Zildjian DipSticks - and Czech Skorpian, Heckler & Koch MP5, etc Submachine Guns to stick out the window behind my kit for some quite unique fills...

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