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My Life With a 2Box or ( The real truth about the 2Box from my perspective)

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  • My Life With a 2Box or ( The real truth about the 2Box from my perspective)

    Stupid title but i am unable to edit it. I wanted: Finally, a 2Box - My Thoughts

    First off let me say I love edrums. I love them for what they are and do not try to make them into acoustic drums. Half of the things people think are "features" of acoustics kits are actually limitations based on laws of physics or acoustics. So I am baffled when people want a hi hat that moves or a 20 inch floor tom. The smaller and more agile my kit the better.

    This being said i love the way real drums sound. I am a drummer after all and started playing when there were no e drums.
    While I love edrums I am not a fan of any particular module. I own a TD-30 and am getting quite irritated at some of the amateur hour lack of features, like layering, and sampling and almost intentionally sucky default kits. Inexcusable Roland. You should have the best kits of all, no one should know your own module better than you. They don't even try. So I am no Roland fanboy. I check DTX900 prices weekly.

    As I asked questions here and occasionally griped, a refrain kept emerging, in fact i hear it everywhere here: 2box, 2box, 2box.
    That toy looking thing? You cant be serious. I kept reading about how the sounds were so real, sample based, open source, hackable etc. I guess i gave in and bought one. You can't argue with those great famous Swedish drummer right. I am fortunate enough to have been able to keep my TD-30, at least for a while. I sacrificed a Nikon to do it though. And I make more $$$ with photography than drumming.

    My first impressions were spot on with my instincts. The thing is a toy, the build quality flimsy. Everything about it feels plasticy and cheap. I don't see these pots lasting long. The paint is runny, the buttons feel mushy, and my gut told me this was a $200 pieces of electronic equipment at most. That's probably what it would cost if it were more massed produced. But OK, lets hear how it sounds.

    And that's where I truly feel completely WTF guys. This thing sounds like complete sh*t. Way worse than My old Alesis DM10. Not just the sounds, but the triggering, the machine gunning (at least it got something realistic - I feel my house should be full of bullet holes.) The worst bass drum sounds I have ever heard. Out of 100 kits there are maybe 10 worth keeping. They go great with that little 2 foot Casio keyboard from the 80s. Also, it hardly has enough power to drive my headphones. I need to amp it.

    Continuing in my bafflement, this things UI is a joke. That's where you gotta give the DM10 it's dues. Its user friendly as hell where this thing is a Gordian knot of Obfuscation and perplexity. I love the little button labeled "more" off to the side that does absolutely nothing. My guess is, at this point, unlike other modules, this one actually REQUIRES a computer to use. Editing kits is certainly not intuitive.

    So lets try to make our own. This is where the thing is really supposed to shine right? Well everyone hear made it sound like you wave a magic wand and your VSTs fluttered into your 2Box with yummy drum goodness. Not true. Making kits ids an ENORMOUS pain in the ass. You pretty much have to be a sound engineer to get any use from this thing. If you are like me and just want to play drums, maybe a little tweaking, then this isn't for you. You are going to spend weeks making kits and I am not even sure they are going to sound all that good given the machine gunning I am hearing from the built in kits.

    Somehow, I got the impression it was not only easy, but everyone had made all these awesome kits and they were all all out there somewhere you could download them and pop em in your own module. I have seen not a single complete kit for download anywhere. And I have been looking.
    There is a $40 piece of software that claims to make kits for you but mostly seems to require 2 other paid software packages to make it work ( they should really tell you that up front) But it does turn my whole screen orange right before it locks up and that matches the toy. And then, apparently, cause I still can't get it to work, it doesn't actually make the kits for you.

    So my opinion is the 2Box is for people who really like to spend more time in front of their computer than their drum set. Its a end user toy fro people who like to tweak VSTs as their primary avocation.

    If anyone wants to actually send me a kit that sounds as good as all of these claims, be my guest.If I am missing a HUGE piece of the picture, feel free to enlighten me. I will try to mess around with it for a while before I junk it. But, I prefer to spend my time playing drums, (or writing posts about how confused I am that everyone loves this thing). For everyone else out there, don't buy into the hype.
    Last edited by evilcartman; 06-16-15, 07:09 PM.

  • #2
    evilcartman,

    While I appreciate that you're experiencing frustration with the 2Box module you acquired, none-the-less, I think you've judged the module too quickly and without understanding the issues. Let's address your most fundamental concerns: (1) poor presets, and (2) machine gunning. These are a tip-off that something is wrong with the module you received. When the 2Box is properly set up, none of the presets machine gun. And, the default presets are very, very good. If Roland and Alesis presets are the standard you're used to, the 2Box presets are a considerable step up. Therefore, my guess is you've somehow received a module that has been tampered with, or the memory has been wiped and replaced with an inferior configuration, or something else. One thing is for sure. What you're describing is *not* how 2Box ships their modules.

    Keep in mind, unlike Roland modules, the kits and sounds in the 2Box module can be completely wiped and replaced. If you bought the module new from a store, return it for a brand new module, test the new module in front of the store people before you take it away, and make sure the store knows the initial module you received has been tampered with. If you bought the module used and don't have a backup of the default configuration, kits, and sounds, I'm not sure if these can be downloaded from the 2Box web site. However, I'd be surprised if another 2Box owner here (like JmanWord) couldn't help you out. Basically, if you're stuck with the module you've got, you need the files necessary for reinstalling the operating system and default kits / sounds.

    I suggest updating the O/S to the latest O/S (available on the 2Box website along with instructions for installing) and re-installing the default kits and sounds. This isn't a tough job. It's just a matter of having the correct files on a memory stick, plugging the stick into the module, putting the module into the appropriate mode, and waiting while the update occurs. I believe you'll need to update the O/S as one step and replace the kits/sounds as another step. An expert 2Box owner can guide you in this. Reach out to the 2Box community and you'll get your answers.

    I'm somewhat astounded by your comments that the 2Box is poorly built. Compared to Roland, Yamaha, and Alesis modules, the 2Box is a big step up in build quality. The 2Box chassis is entirely metal and built of considerably thicker and more solid metal than any module from the Big Three. All I/O connectors are bolted to the chassis whereas the Big Three use PC-board-mounted I/O that moves and bends as you plug cords in and out. (Yes, that's the PC board itself moving and bending! I've never been a fan of this style of construction, but, for cost reduction, it has become the norm from the Big Three. 2Box is one of only a few electronic musical instrument manufacturers that still bolt I/O properly to the chassis.) I don't recall the 2Box pots being of inferior and/or poorer quality as compared with other modules. Granted, given 2Box's notion that all I/O is bolted down, I'm surprised the pots aren't bolted to the chassis, but I've never felt any movement when using 2Box modules. The entire module is well built and has an extremely solid and professional feel.

    Once again, as above, if your module doesn't exhibit these build features, something is fishy. If you bought the module used, I'd say someone pulled a fast one on you. Maybe the seller completely modified the module for some reason? I have no idea what the condition of your module is, but the comments you've made don't equate with any experiences I've had using 2Box modules.

    Regarding your comments as to why drummers using electronic drums still want the physical and sonic characteristics of acoustic drums (correct sizes, swinging cymbals, hi-hats that open, acoustically responsive and believable sounds, etc.), ask yourself the following. Why do users of digital pianos want keys that are weighted and that play and perform like a piano? Why even have the keys and pitches in the same order as a piano? The answer, of course, is because that's the instrument. Those musicians have developed technique on a piano and that's the instrument they want to play. The digital piano is a convenience, but it's not an original instrument. At best, it's a close approximation of an acoustic piano. Ditto for electronic drums. I can understand there is a group of players who might take the approach "why care about acoustic drums; this instrument is its own thing". That's fine. However, for a large number of drummers, as with pianists, the electronic drum kit is a convenience and a substitute for the acoustic counterpart. As such, these drummers want to use the techniques and sounds they've learned on acoustic drums and hence why they want the physical and sonic characteristics of an acoustic kit.

    Finally, about building kits from scratch for the 2Box. This is not a task for beginners or for the faint of heart. It is most certainly detailed work that takes time and learning, even with the best tools available. If you've got the default 2Box kits properly installed, you don't need to build kits from scratch. The default kits are very good on their own. However, if you want something more personalized, then you can wander the "build from scratch" path.

    As when building any sample library, you'll have to use your ears, do a lot of testing, and create numerous iterations before you're done. That's the price of admission. For some, the rewards are worth it. For others, this is too much time and money. Yes, you must *buy* the libraries you want to reconfigure for 2Box. None of the VSTi libraries are free, although there are some high quality, free, open source drum sample libraries available on the Internet.

    It's not fair to compare a closed system (like Roland's TD-30) to an open system like 2Box. The 2Box provides configurability and flexibility (in terms of access to source sounds and sample layer management) that the Roland module does not. If you want to access this degree of customizability, you'll need to put in the time. For contrast though, ask yourself this. Given all the VEX packs, programming, tweaking, and custom TD-30 kits that are available and that users are putting in their modules, have you ever heard a TD-30 that doesn't sound like a TD-30? I haven't. Regardless of what you do to it, the TD-30 stands out with a very unique sonic character. Some people like this. Others don't like it. In any event, I put it to you that the TD-30, despite all its knobs, buttons, and parameters, isn't anywhere near as customizable as the 2Box. Is the 2Box easy to customize? No, not if you want to build kits from scratch, but at least the capability is there. With the 2Box, you can completely change the sonic character of the module to anything you wish, provided you're willing to put in the time, learning, and, in some cases, money required.

    When considering the steps required for building a 2Box kit from scratch, it helps to have experience with other samplers and sample libraries. Given my own experience with samplers (both software and hardware) and what I've seen from 2Box, in my estimation, the 2Box system provides a marvelous and easy-to-use computer interface for managing samples and sample layers. This is about the easiest system I've seen for doing this within a dedicated hardware module. If you're expecting "tweak a few buttons and I'm done" configuration, your expectations are out of line with the scope of work involved. There are many reasons why Roland hasn't gone down the "user installable samples" path, but I suspect one reason is as I've just outlined. This is very detailed work and it takes both experience and trial and error to get it right. By not allowing users to change the samples and sample layers, Roland maintains consistency in the sound and usability of their modules. I'll underline again though that I'm well aware Roland has other reasons for not providing an open system that allows the same style of massive samples and massively multilayer sample velocity mapping as 2Box.
    Last edited by TangTheHump; 06-17-15, 05:09 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks Tang. I always appreciate what you have to say around here. I am starting to wonder if I may have got a counterfeit module. Nothing you say seems to jibe with what I have here. Has anyone been knowm to be making counterfeits of these. I think there orange shell is a painted plastic and I see a few gobs where the paint balled. I can't speak for the connectors, they plug in solidly, but the thing barely has the power to drive my AKG 702s louder than the pads. The pots don't twist smoothly at all. Compared to the TD-30, which feels like a precision made machine, and quite tanky.

      I also thought there were lights around the instrument buttons. I have no ring lights nut the names light up. That may be just some photos where the orange rings are so bright that it looked lit up. My unit was supposedly new but not local and not sealed.. Never seen a 2box on the east coast or I would have at least demoed it. There was no instruction manual either. I am still not sure where to plug in the Hi Hat controller.

      As far as the other. I have SD 2 and over 2K in VSTs. I wasn't referring to that, it was SDSE. No one on this forum who talks about how great the 2Box is ever mentions what a HUGE undertaking building kits from your own samples is. It's all just " get a 2box man, it's open source, sample based bra. Comes with a hacky sack, dude, its awesome" And I guess I made the incorrect assumption that peeps would be willing to share their awesome, hyper realistic kits. That one is on me. I wouldn't think copyright is an issue after all the processing too.I wonder if many of the 2box evangelists have ever even used one.

      I was about to shell out the money for SDSE and then discovered you HAVE to buy Reaper and DsoundTool for it work. Which they don't tell you before you buy it! I am done throwing money at this stuff.

      As far as the A vs E drums. I know what you're saying, thats why mesh heads and plastic plating is for. You already got the A kit there. And if you can't hit a 10 inch circle and forget which is the high tom cause they are all the same size, you might need to go back to drum school. I don't think the weighted keys is a fair analogy. That's more of drumhead, feel thing. And I remember when I started playing drums in 1980, for 700 bucks you could buy a hi hat that moved the bottom cymbal only, so your playing surface never moved. Pro drummers would endorse this thing saying how you can never have true precision when your top hat is moving around all the time. Now people pay that same amout to get one that moves again.

      I don't know a drummer worth his salt that can't do their job on a ******* cabinet and a few pots. My guitarist can pick up a toy plastic guitar missing strings and sound amazing with it. I like the sleek flexibiltiy with edrums and wouldn't try to cripple them by making them A drums. Put a mesh head on your A drums and use them if that's what you are after. But I get what you're saying. If you look at my kit of black white and silver, there is a shiny huge gold metal cymbal done up Jman style, sticks out like adrummer at a dinner party. I can keep time on anything, but if I am gonna swing, i need an damn ride cymbal, a real, big metal, floppy one with a big ass bell. I do get it. But that was not really the thread here.

      Anyway, first thing tomorrow, gonna dowload fresh OS and kits and manual from 2Box and start again.

      Comment


      • #4
        Could you post some close up pictures of the module you have? I, too, am starting to wonder if you didn't get a cheap Medelli module in a not so good copy of the 2Box look alike box.

        Maybe some members here with the 2Box module can compare and find out if you got the real thing or not.
        DTX700, A2E Dixon kit, Yamaha cymbals, FSR HH Kit Pix

        My new venture: voglosounds.com

        Comment


        • #5
          evilcartman,

          Hey, thank for taking my comments in the positive way they are intended. I certainly wasn't taking a shot at you or criticizing you, but rather attempting to point out that something doesn't match up here. It seems you understood that and I applaud your willingness to hear this feedback.

          Based on your follow-up comments, I'll note two things, as follows:

          1.) Before you do anything vis-a-vis upgrading the operating system and reinstalling the default kits and sounds, etc., I encourage you to validate your module. It does seem your module is a counterfeit or a unit that has been significantly tampered with. You noted the module came unsealed and with no manual. Also, you noted things like "balls of paint" on the knobs and on the chassis, and that the chassis feels plastic-like. This is not a factory 2Box build. There is nothing plastic-like or unprofessional (paint blobs) in the construction of the 2Box module. Seriously, return that module and get one that is factory sealed.

          Side note: On the 2Box module, the only thing a tad downgraded from what you get in a high-end module like the TD-30 is the front panel labels. Unlike the TD-30 where the front panel has a brushed metal finish with letters applied directly to the panel and a proper glass over the display, instead the entire front panel of the 2Box is covered with a pseudo-decal of sorts. This decal is a thick plastic material that is stuck onto the metal front panel of the unit. It's a single, thick piece of plastic with adhesive backing and it includes a clear section covering the display and all lettering for the pots and buttons. The way this pseudo-decal is applied is very professional. Nothing is sticking up, the corners are rounded, and the entire thing is inset into the metal (there's a metal lip around the unit) so that the front panel has a flat, professional feel. This is the only aspect of the 2Box module that isn't up to the same build quality as a flagship Roland module, but it's still very professionally done. No rough edges. No raised sections. No blobs of excess material, paint, or adhesive anywhere.


          2.) Regarding headphone volume with AKG K702 headphones. Those are an open back style of headphone so they won't eliminate much background noise, which includes sticking noise. Also, in my experience, AKG headphones, while clean and accurate, are extremely inefficient. I tried numerous pairs with my TD-30 and with an outboard, professional grade headphone amplifier and both were barely able to drive the AKG phones. My last pair, a set of K271 MKIIs, were barely audible above the acoustic stick noise of the TD-30KV, even with the headphone volume of the TD-30 module turned all the way up. Even more disconcerting is that the drivers popped (i.e. the drivers exceeded their excursion limit) on bass drum transients. Both quiet and loud bass drum transients caused this problem. I've been a fan of AKG headphones for a long time due to their clean, un-muddled presentation and particularly due to the fact that their bass frequencies aren't overstated. However, after trying numerous mid-range and close to top-end pairs with my TD-30, I came to the conclusion AKG phones aren't designed for e-drums.

          I'm now using a pair of Shure SRH940. While the build quality of the SRH940 phones leaves a lot to be desired, none-the-less, the presentation is neutral, especially in the low and mid frequencies (with mids being perhaps a tad over pronounced rather than scooped, which is perfect for e-drums). Also, the SRH940 phones are considerably more efficient than anything I've used from AKG. Both the TD-30 and my external headphone amplifier (an ART HeadAmp6 Pro) have no problem driving the SRH940.

          For comparison, even the high impedance version of the Beyer Dynamic DT-770 headphones (the DT 770 Pro) sound more efficient than any AKG phones I've used, despite the fact the technical specifications would have one believe otherwise. Still, I do not recommend the DT-770 or DT-770 Pro headphones. These are mid-scooped, shrill-sounding, bottom-end-heavy phones that I wouldn't wish on anyone. Very muddy sounding. The only positive with these phones is the build quality - all metal headband with leather covering, metal hinges, etc. These will never break. But, all the models sound awful.

          If clean presentation and reasonable build quality are important to you, I'd check out the Shure SRH1540. These have all the cleanliness and efficiency of the SRH940 phones with much better build quality. SRH1540: $500 USD. SRH940: $300 USD. If you baby the SRH940s, they can get by, but the headband and earpiece extension system are all plastic, and that's where these phones tend to break. Both my pairs are still fine, but I treat them very, very carefully. The SRH1540 maintains the high sound quality and solves the build quality problems.


          Good luck validating your 2Box module. I know I'm repeating myself, but if you have the option to return it, don't muck around. Return it! Get the store to order you a brand new one. If they won't, just get your money back and go elsewhere. Everything you've described sounds fishy. This is not the experience I had testing multiple 2Box modules and I've never heard owners describe these problems, either. If you post some pictures, though I'm not a 2Box owner, I can validate whether your module appears legitimate. So can others here. Several close-up shots of the front, back, and sides would be helpful. But really, you're not happy with it and everything you've said causes me to believe that's a bogus module. Therefore, I urge you not to waste time validating it here. Return it quickly so the seller / store doesn't have reason to think you're doing anything suspicious. By the way, where did you buy the module?

          Comment


          • #6
            No one on this forum who talks about how great the 2Box is ever mentions what a HUGE undertaking building kits from your own samples is. It's all just " get a 2box man, it's open source, sample based bra. Comes with a hacky sack, dude, its awesome" And I guess I made the incorrect assumption that peeps would be willing to share their awesome, hyper realistic kits. That one is on me.
            This bears repeating. Yes it has been said over the years but when it has, to use newspaper parlance "the lede was buried". It's why whenever I see the "ignore everything else and BUY 2BOX!!!!!!" posts, I'm always tempted to remind people that the setup curve, ie., all the up front work, can be massive. Looking back at reviews from folks like Jman, nothing stock in 2Box is worth writing home about but unless you have the time, the samples and the willingness to craft VST-eque kits on the thing, it ain't gonna happen by magic.

            When I first got a Yamaha Multi 12, I was really intrigued by the layering (it was my first exposure to it) and I worked hard to understand what was going on and how to do it but man, as you say, what a crapton of work. It's why when Yamaha released a slew of kits, etc., for the Multi 12 it was a godsend.

            One question, have you cast about to 2Box users about obtaining their "kits"? I know at least in Roland World, people have shared kits from various modules over the years. When I first got a DTX900 I had the same issue: okay stock kits but would have loved to be able to either download or purchase something VEX-like. Or a "layer-library" to use the layering function on that module. If there's one thing that would entice a lot of people to look at any non-Roland option for edrums, it would be the ability to have kit sharing for various brands and modules.

            Lemme stress I'm not commenting on the various other issues you mention as I have no experience that might provide helpful commentary. My screed is all about the seemingly overlooked "lots of up front work" needed with 2Box to really get the most out of it's capabilities.

            www.digitaldrummermag.com
            www.dauphinehotel.com
            TD-12, DTX502, SD1000, EZDrummer, Diamond Drum 12" snare, S1000 toms/cymbals/kick, PCY10/100/135/155, CY-5/14, Hart Ride, Hart Acupad 8" kick, Epedal Pro II, Concept 1 pads/cymbals, SD1000 & Roland V Sessions racks, PD-7, Kit Toy 10" splash, DMPad ride, SamplePad, PerformancePad Pro

            Comment


            • #7
              All I can say is that if you are going to spend any grand amount on an e kit, what's another $100 to simplify the sample building process to a mere one button process that literally takes minutes to convert a giant deep layered kit? It's like listening to your kit with 2 dollar earbuds and griping because your new module sounds bad.

              The manual, OS updates, stock samples and more are offered at the 2Box site and they are All FREE.

              There is no such animal as an "all in one, perfect, plug and play module" that meets everyone's needs directly out of the box. It does not exist...period. You have to do the work to reap the best benefits from every module on the market. Everything that you've never used has some sort of leanring curve. Some more than others. However, there is just way too much evidence out there that supports the complete opposite of what you are experiencing. Either you have bought a faulty product or you have not taken enough time to learn the system. I believe it may be the latter since you admit not having a manual or even knowing how to plug in the HH controller.

              Take a breath...relax...update...read...convert....play.. .enjoy. It's really not that complicated. Time consuming, yes,....complicated, no. Most great experiences are well worth the time involved if you are willing to invest it.

              Have fun.
              8 piece DIY Acrylic, 2x2Box DrumIt5, Gen16 4xDCP, DIY Acrylic&Gen16 Conversions, Sleishman Twin-QuadSteele hybrid, Gibraltar&DrumFrame rack, DW9502LB, Midi Knights Pro Lighting
              http://www.airbrushartists.org/DreamscapeAirbrushRealm

              Comment


              • #8
                grog wrote:
                Looking back at reviews from folks like Jman, nothing stock in 2Box is worth writing home about. Unless you have the time, the samples, and the willingness to craft VST-eque kits on the thing, it ain't gonna happen by magic. (snip) Lemme stress I'm not commenting on the various other issues you mention as I have no experience that might provide helpful commentary. My screed is all about the seemingly overlooked "lots of up front work" needed with 2Box to really get the most out of it's capabilities.

                To get the most from the 2Box, yes one is going to spend a lot of time configuring the module, just as with any other module. However, the default 2Box sounds are very usable! They are, in fact, a huge step up from the current sounds offered in Yamaha and Roland modules. For starters, there is *no* machine gunning, which makes these sounds usable in recording situations. Conversely, the machine gunning of the Yamaha and Roland sounds sticks out like a sore thumb. Equally importantly, the 2Box default sounds are very playable and acoustically believable out of the box. To get that with a Roland module, you've got to spend many hours re-working the default presets and/or brewing presets from scratch, and even then the machine gunning and synthetic nature of the sounds stands out.

                Though I've have played the 2Box multiple times and for many hours, you don't need to take my word for it. Read what Sound On Sound has to say about the quality of the 2Box module's default sounds.

                Sound On Sound 2Box DrumIt Five Review
                http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/feb1...rumit-five.htm

                From the Sound On Sound Review:
                "The first preset kit, DrumIt Live Kit, showcases the kit extremely well. Playing this kit for the first time, I was genuinely gobsmacked by how good it sounds! The snare drum is incredibly responsive and dynamic, the toms have a small amount of natural ambience, and the level of expression achievable from the multi-sampled voices is very impressive. Even the cymbals and hi-hat, usually the weak link in electronic kits, are surprisingly good, although they still lack the full authenticity of the real thing. The remaining 99 preset kits are all of an equally impressive standard and include intriguing names such as Give It Away, The Pretender, Kashmir, Roxanne, and Sweet Home. No prizes for guessing what kits they might be based on. (snip) The bells and whistles (quite literally in some cases!) on some kits are great, and I've enjoyed them very much, but if it's real drums you're after, it would be difficult to beat the DrumIt Five. Out of the box (or even two boxes...), it's a fantastic instrument. The preset kits and samples are really very impressive, but add to that the ability to create your own multi-layered sounds and you have an incredibly powerful system."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by fulrmr(Daniel) View Post
                  All I can say is that if you are going to spend any grand amount on an e kit, what's another $100 to simplify the sample building process to a mere one button process that literally takes minutes to convert a giant deep layered kit?
                  Yes, I don't even bother trying to build .dsnds for the 2Box module without using SDSE. By the way: Reaper and DsoundTool are included with the download of SDSE. Reaper has a Free trial period of 30 days if I remember right. And DsoundTool only asks for a small contribution to a charity if you are going to keep it and use it. So that means with SDSE you can go ahead and convert some dsnds for the 2Box module right away and decide if you want to buy Reaper (one of the best, least expensive DAWs out there) and Dsoundtool after trying things out. I had bought Reaper and used DsoundTool long before SDSE was even conceived.

                  I actually pioneered building VST software into 2Box dsnds along with a 2Box forum member SlaptheDrummer before SDSE was around. And have 100's of sounds I built from VSTs before SDSE came out. SDSE was originally developed to take the steps that we had documented (dozens of steps) and make that into an application that literally takes only a click or two to accomplish. Lustar has developed it way beyond where it started and continues to add more improvements/features. So, yeah if you are planning to do some sound building from VST programs you will want SDSE. There is even a free evaluation version of SDSE you can try that will convert everything but cymbals and Hi Hat if you are just wanting to test the waters.

                  I guess I'm one of those people referred to that is always pushing the praises of 2Box. I have no endorsements, makes no dif to me what brand people use. I recommend products that I am sold on myself. For me the 2Box module has been a great choice.

                  Also, as Tang mentions the stock 2Box sounds including the free add on dsnds offered on the website are very good. They have improved and added some nice sounds since the module originally released. So a person can stick with that if they desire and should be quite happy. Personally, I like to take advantage of everything I can get out of a product, that is what inspired me for creating new dsnds in the beginning ...... that is my excuse.

                  J
                  Last edited by JmanWord; 06-17-15, 04:59 PM.
                  I could tell you where to stick that piezo! ;)
                  Stealthdrums.com Mega Kit: Pearl Mimic Pro ,2Box modules,drums and cymbals too many to count. VST quality sounds directly from the Mimic and custom sounds loaded into and played directly from the 2Box modules. Visit me anytime at: http://stealthdrums.com/

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by fulrmr(Daniel) View Post
                    . I believe it may be the latter since you admit not having a manual or even knowing how to plug in the HH controller.

                    Have fun.
                    Originally posted by perceval View Post
                    Could you post some close up pictures of the module you have? I, too, am starting to wonder if you didn't get a cheap Medelli module in a not so good copy of the 2Box look alike box.

                    Maybe some members here with the 2Box module can compare and find out if you got the real thing or not.
                    I said it didn't come with a manual. Of course I downloaded it AND read it and followed the instructions which say
                    "You just want to start right now? Good news for everyone who is in a hurry or just doesn't like to study manuals:
                    The concept of the DrumIt Five is designed so all functions can be learned by trial and error. Everything
                    can be done by intuition. There are no complicated sub menus or hidden key commands.
                    The logically constructed operating system is virtually self-explanatory.
                    "

                    It further states that unlike other modules, 2box is designed to play out of the box and sound good. That's crap. It also says that the module was designed to be used with ANY pads. No mention that you are f'ed if you don't have a 2box hi hat.

                    Then I read on 2box forums how notoriously BAD 2box quality control is. Never heard mention of that here. But since I get hardly any volume out of the phone jack AND every snare machine guns "perfectly". I recorded the snare and overlayed the SA and the sounds look identical. So I am thinking a bad unit and not user error.

                    And lastly, the reason I can drop a grand on a kit is because I don't go tossing away c notes here and there. No one likes to throw away money. That being said, I will spend 40 bucks on good software. But they really need to tell you upfront that you gotta buy 2 more programs for it to work, or better yet, arrange cross licensing with the other software so you just need to buy one program. It was the another surprise in an already frustrating day.

                    As far as photographs, any area of the module I should focus on? I did notice a vast majority of the kits are those electric effect clown type things, techno beats, and sound effects. Not real drums. That doesn't seem right.
                    One of the things that may be effecting what I hear is the amount of gain I have to throw to even hear the drums well. If it turns out to be boinkers or fake, I bought from a reputable music store in NY, so I know they will make good.

                    Thanks everyone for your help and input. Still, no kit offers though.

                    Just for the flexibility of memory alone, if I can get this thing sounding decent, it will be awesome. Even if it takes a month to make a single kit. if it sounds like Joe Barisi's Evil Drums, it will be worth it.
                    The HiHat is still a problem though. Can I midi out from the td30 the HH controller and cymbal and have it play in the 2Box?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      evilcartman,

                      evilcartman wrote:
                      I did notice a vast majority of the kits are those electric effect clown type things, techno beats, and sound effects. Not real drums. That doesn't seem right.
                      It isn't right. Those are not the default presets and sounds. The default presets are mostly usable, acoustic drum kits. That's one of the nice things about the 2Box module. Unlike modules from competitors, the 2Box comes with very little in the way of goofy, useless sound effects and gimmick kits. It's all playable, acoustic drum kits. You've got a module that is buggered. RETURN IT! GET A NEW ONE! Is there a reason you can't return it?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Jman: Thanks for the update on the onboard sounds. You were one of the people early on having a great big "yawn" over them.

                        www.digitaldrummermag.com
                        www.dauphinehotel.com
                        TD-12, DTX502, SD1000, EZDrummer, Diamond Drum 12" snare, S1000 toms/cymbals/kick, PCY10/100/135/155, CY-5/14, Hart Ride, Hart Acupad 8" kick, Epedal Pro II, Concept 1 pads/cymbals, SD1000 & Roland V Sessions racks, PD-7, Kit Toy 10" splash, DMPad ride, SamplePad, PerformancePad Pro

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by grog View Post
                          Jman: Thanks for the update on the onboard sounds. You were one of the people early on having a great big "yawn" over them.

                          www.digitaldrummermag.com
                          www.dauphinehotel.com
                          Hi Grog. Yeah, I followed the 2Box since the first time it was shown at NAMM. Not sure whether that was 2009 or 2010? There were delays in release and some hardware problems and it was ORANGE. I was not won over for sure. It was a pretty rough start for a small start up company. And my impressions just sitting down at the kit without side by side comparison was that the sounds were good, but I was not impressed to the point that I was planning on dumping my TD-20X modules and change directions. Also I was not clear how compatible the 2Box module would be to my own drums and cymbals. In 2011 after attending NAMM again .... I decided to get ahold of a 2Box module. I picked up a used 2Box kit, they were not available in the US, so Computerman actually picked up a kit for me that I found in the UK and shipped it to me in the US. My intention was simply to test the original pads and cymbals and test my own with the 2Box module to see if I could develop drum and cymbal conversion kits compatible to the module. It was having the Roland and 2Box modules setup side by side on my monster kit that changed my mind. And definitely after delving into creating my own sounds ....... that definitely sealed the deal, at that point I dumped one of my TD-20X modules and six months later switched out the second TD-20X to 2Box.

                          There have been a lot of new sounds and improvements on original files made available since the first module was released, so it is definitely improved over what I sat down to in 2010/2011. As well as the OS updates. The most recent OS makes it easier to dial in non 2Box pads. And as far as converting VSTs now with SDSE .... also a much easier situation.
                          I could tell you where to stick that piezo! ;)
                          Stealthdrums.com Mega Kit: Pearl Mimic Pro ,2Box modules,drums and cymbals too many to count. VST quality sounds directly from the Mimic and custom sounds loaded into and played directly from the 2Box modules. Visit me anytime at: http://stealthdrums.com/

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by TangTheHump View Post
                            evilcartman,



                            It isn't right. Those are not the default presets and sounds. The default presets are mostly usable, acoustic drum kits. That's one of the nice things about the 2Box module. Unlike modules from competitors, the 2Box comes with very little in the way of goofy, useless sound effects and gimmick kits. It's all playable, acoustic drum kits. You've got a module that is buggered. RETURN IT! GET A NEW ONE! Is there a reason you can't return it?
                            No reason at all. Except I was hoping just the software was buggered. So before I'm sending it back I was going to restore the regional factory OS but I'm running into a new problem. It looks like it's going to take over an hour just to copy four gigs from the module (back up) that doesn't seem right either.

                            Of the bottleneck isn't my computer that's for sure. Has anybody backed up their original memory and take that long?

                            But at this point I'm probably ready just to get a new one anyway on principle. Thanks everybody for letting me know. I would've never known And would've junked this thing and gone on my merry way without ever knowing.

                            EC

                            " like anyone who isn't Steve Gadd or Vinnie, my drumming benefits greatly from a little reverb."

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Hi JManWord,did you ever check out the 2 box with roland pd -105/128s/kd-120? and if not,what would you suggest for a trigger-the 2box pads or something else.I myself am thinking of selling my 4 month old TD-30 module for something else
                              1-td-30module,1-,pd128sbc,3-pd-105,1-pd120wh,2-cy-8,1-td10EXP. module- DDRUM4 SE STEALTH MESH HEAD/BLACK POWDER RACK,2 BEHRINGER 2031A MONITORS,KRK 10"SUB/BEHRINGER 1204 MIXER,VIC FIRTH/VATER

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