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A first time user....

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  • A first time user....

    I am interested in getting a new drum set. I've been wanting to go electric for sometime and now I have the oportunity. I was wanting to know, What do you think a beginner like me should buy or look for in a set of Roland Vdrums?
    Knock Knock! (Who's There?) SHHH!!!

  • #2
    Originally posted by Dr.Evil:
    I am interested in getting a new drum set. I've been wanting to go electric for sometime and now I have the oportunity. I was wanting to know, What do you think a beginner like me should buy or look for in a set of Roland Vdrums?
    1st, welcome.

    2nd, how long have you been drumming?

    3rd, what is your goal w/e-drums?

    4th, how much $ are you ready to spend?

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    -~

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    • #3
      5th, Have you ever played edrums?

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      szvook
      Studio

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      • #4
        Yes, decide what you want to be doing in ten years on e-drums, and base your purchase on that, because you'll never go back.

        BINARY

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        • #5
          [QUOTE]Originally posted by Marc.:

          4th, how much $ are you ready to spend?


          Welcome, keep in mind that if you plan on playing without headphones, perhaps in front of a crowd, plan on spending some cash on a good sound system for your drums. Lots of posts on this topic..do a search and check out all the idea's.

          Above all have fun.

          Comment


          • #6
            Dr.Evil,

            If you will play out live, make sure the venue has reference monitors of some kind. This way you can save your own PA + you can PUSH their PA. I have never played in a place that did not provide reference monitors for the band and - I don't!!!!!!
            The only thing I do bring is my K2 amp when we play a large venue. Then I peel the paint of the place!!!!!!!!!!

            You must try to find this out before hand; otherwise you will have to bring your PA.

            Home PA's belong at home so you tune your sounds to your liking and get them ready for gigs (if you are going to play out).

            Multilin is correct. Headphones will help you, but can be misleading when it comes down to putting your sounds down to record or to play out. A good PA will help you to determine how your Roland sounds.

            Good luck!!!!!


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            szvook

            [This message has been edited by szvook (edited March 13, 2001).]
            Studio

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            • #7
              I've been drumming for 3 to 4 years before now. Yes, I have played edrums before. And I've been thinking about spending no more than 4,000 dollars.Although I plan on making monthly installments since I don't exactly have all of that with me. What do you think would be my best bet.
              Knock Knock! (Who's There?) SHHH!!!

              Comment


              • #8
                Best bets: Check the classifieds here. Some good deals to be had. Also, decide if you prefer the larger V-Pro pads (10"/12") or the V-Customs (8"). Pluses and minuses to both. I like the Customs-they've improved my accuracy, and are easier to transport and set up in a slightly smaller space. I think the TD-8 and the TD-10 are both excellent modules, suitable for practice and playing out. Lots to do with either, creating kits for the music you play, tweaking pad and instrument settings, etc.

                Beyond Roland, some folks like the other kits that can be used with Roland brains (Hart mostly, some Pintech). And some folks really prefer the ddrums. I haven't played with these. So, best bet here is to check the archives and do lots of searches, figure out what's important to you, and how to get it economically! Good luck!!!!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Dr.Evil, Here is the medicine, if you will and basically my .02 cents.

                  drmoze is right about this forum, it is very insightful for edrummers.

                  The only way to find your set (this could be view as unfortunately) is to play them. But that is tough to do especially if want to try various combinations between modules and pads.

                  Try to find out what stores in your area have set ups available and come there when it is slow at the store so you can try them for a while and not get bothered.
                  I had to drive a bit outside of Los Angeles to have a chance to try set ups that I had no aces too and that paid off in getting the right set for me.

                  Since you mentioned that you are going to go with making monthly installments, find out if you can exchange the set up and try another one while continuing with your monthly installments. Stores do have the exchange policy within x amount of day’s, so find out if you can exchange your set up and try another one. The store will still have the sale going and you can have the chance to play with different sets (based on inventory at the store).

                  Hell, try to find out if someone in your area has as set of edrums, buy a case or two of beer and invite yourself (graciously) over

                  I believe some pad manufacturers give a trial time for users. I might be wrong so look around.

                  Otherwise consider the experience of edrummers to come up with your first and maybe your last set, you never know, first time is the charm for some people.

                  Good luck !!!



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                  szvook

                  [This message has been edited by szvook (edited March 13, 2001).]

                  [This message has been edited by szvook (edited March 13, 2001).]
                  Studio

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                  • #10
                    1. buy what you like

                    2. as a beginner I wouldn't buy a top-end kit at first. On the other hand: after 5 years, you're no longer a beginner and then you do have that top-kit. As long as it isn't outdated then...

                    3. decide what you want: for home practice alone you can have a kit with all the bells and whistles. For live and studio use in general a dry drum sound (with no effects bleeding on the output) is required. Also the sound between playing with headphones and through a sound system is very different.
                    This is a very important decission. I liked my Vdrums very, very much when playing at home, but live things turned out to be very different !
                    Robert

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                    • #11
                      [QUOTE]Originally posted by puttenvr:
                      I liked my Vdrums very, very much when playing at home, but live things turned out to be very different !

                      Not to change the subject but...

                      Hey Puttenvr, when you did play live with the TD-10xp, what mixer and signal processors did you use in your rack? Just curious.




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                      szvook
                      Studio

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                      • #12
                        About 8 months ago I played with my Vdrums live (and weekly in practice room)

                        I did not use any signal processors since the Vdrum sound was already processed enough People even discouraged me to use extra compressors in order to get a more compact sound.
                        Robert

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                        • #13
                          Maybe Roland did not try their modules in live situations at all. It seem to be a valid request don’t you think, try the frigging thing live, through a sound system, with no external signal processors or a mixer. Just the TD-10 & TD-8 by them self’s and find out what you made and how it sounds.

                          Any way, without a good rack with decent processors you won't be happy at all no matter what you do and the professional performance it out the window. I had a chance to jam on stage with a TD-10exp with Roland pads that was running through a good rack and I thought it sounded pretty damn good. I firmly believe that the Roland’s by them self’s in a live situation will not cut it.

                          puttenvr, are you using any signal processors with you ddrum's?


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                          szvook
                          Studio

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by szvook:
                            Any way, without a good rack with decent processors you won't be happy at all no matter what you do
                            Perhaps this is the reason that I also heard Vdrums through a huge sound system which sounded good to me. It was on a tv broadvcast, perhaps the tv-technique also plays a part. I don't know. Anyway: I was never able to get a decent sound through my (affordable for poor people like me) sound system with the Vdrums. My theory: you boost a sound which is already processed through a sound system which again processes the sound as a result of which the sounds gets synthetic. Together with some poor samples (fortunately not all) and the weak dynamics, the Vdrums weren't for me. But perhaps people with huge sound systems have less problems. Can be.


                            puttenvr, are you using any signal processors with you ddrum's?
                            Nope. The back to basics sound from ddrum was a relieve to me. I got a perfect sound from scratch. No matter if I play on small or large systems. No matter if sound engineers add effects or not. But to keep it as simple as possible, I don't use any effects or processors. And I am quite happy with it.
                            Robert

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                            • #15
                              That is the most important thing; a system that gives you what you want in the required environment.

                              I have to disagree with you on the your theory: “you boost a sound which is already processed through a sound system which again processes the sound as a result of which the sounds gets synthetic”. It all depends on the signal processors components and how they are interlinked. Yeah the money issue can be a factor and I can see why a ddrum for example can be a solution without going to rack full of gear, which leads to more $ to be spend.

                              The sounds are synthetic yes, but that can be changed very easily with a good warm tube EQ, which can be altered a bit further, which I don’t think you can do with a sample.

                              I’ am going to get a chance to play the ddrums tonight though a good rack with nice toys inside and I’ am going to compare how they sound through signal processors and how they sound just by them self’s.

                              At leased there more options today that before to find the ideal set. That IS the most important thing by far!

                              Thanks puttenvr for the response. Happy drumming.




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                              szvook
                              Studio

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