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Where should all these cables go ???

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  • Where should all these cables go ???

    Hi guys,
    I have just finished my(thousandth???)attempt to fix all the jacks in a decent way,so I don't have to remove them on each gig ,and my V's don't look like a rain forest.
    I would like to know how you guys deal with this issue(do you move the rack with cables on it,do you hang each cable in a separate way ?....etc)
    Thanx
    POSTNUKLEAR
    Nabil

  • #2
    You may want to do a search on this, it's been discussed before.

    One mention, if you look into the split cable housings, don't get them at a music store, they're cheaper online and at Radio Smack.

    BINARY

    Comment


    • #3
      One easy and handy method (the one I'm using!) involves the simple purchase of a roll of velcro tape. It's like the velcro strips that Roland supplies (fur on one side, velcro hooks on the other) except that it's a bit wider (1"?) and comes in a big roll that you can cut to size. I run my cables with a little slack from the pad end, and collect the slack on the left side by the module. I use the velcro tape to wrap the cables to the frame every foot or so, with a bit of extra slack by the uprights.

      To transport, I simply unplug the cables from the pads and brain, so there's a foot or less of each cable 'dangling' from the rack. I loosen the side arms and fold them inward, and collapse the cymbal arms downward, then slightly tighten the clamps again to hold the rack in its folded position.

      For neatness, I have a couple of 1-foot lengths of plastic split cable cover, about 1.5" in diameter. I fold the cable slack back and forth by the brain, and put the bunched cable inside these plastic tubes. Then these are attached to the rack arm with longer lengths of the velcro tape, and this part never needs to be moved or undone.

      All cable plugs (both ends) are labeled with small tape strips. Set-up is very quick, simply unfolding the rack, putting the pads back on (only the cymbal arms need to be readjusted), and plugging the labeled cable ends into the right spots.

      Works for me! $^)

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      • #4
        Just shell out some dough and get a good balanced 1/4 inch snake, you will thank yourself.

        ------------------
        szvook
        Studio

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        • #5
          To SZVook
          What do you mean by this? Are you saying to make up 1/4" jack to jack leads to specific lengths and then loam them together?
          Thanks
          Dean

          ------------------

          Comment


          • #6
            That's exactly what I did ACME. I bought a bunch of 1/4" jacks and about 125' of cable from a local music shop and custom made all my cables. I then used wire ties to bunch them together in 3 different length snakes then used the split cable housing on them. The only problem I have had so far is that the connectors and cable I used is much beefier than the stock cables that come with the V's and it tends to put a lot of weight on the back of the brains when they are all plugged in. I have been thinking about fabricating some sort of load bearing bracket that will take the weight off the cables and jacks but I haven't really sat down to design it yet. You can sort of see these on my pictures of my kit on my site: http://members.home.net/captkidd . Click on the pictures and they will enlarge, in the second picture you can sort of see all the jacks out the back of the TD-10. I apologize if it takes awhile for the site to come up, for some reason pages on the @home network sometimes tend to bog down and take awhile to come up. Hope this helps.

            Brian Kidd
            Portland, Or

            Comment


            • #7
              Hi Acme,

              CaptKidd's resolution is suitable as well.

              I got a good 1/4 stereo snake with very light and thin cables. The cables were used for professional sound recording in a film so their size had to be small and LIGHT, which helped me a lot. With these types of cables, you donít get any spaghetti affect at all. The snake is very small and light and putts no weight on the inputs. I got lucky with getting these cables and I would recommend using cables like these, the problem can be finding them, since most if not all music stores do not carry them. You might want to look around for retailers that deal with film companies (audio and such). The cables that I have are about 1/16 of an inch thick.

              The cables that CaptKidd used weigh a little more than he wanted, but the result is the same.

              Just a regular snake 1/4 to 1/4 inch is good enough. I have mine lifted so nothing is on my drum riser and I don't have to step over anything.

              Some stores have snakes wrapped together in various lengths and some snakes even have curtain lengths to some cables within the snake already, you need to ask around if your retailers carry different types of snakes.

              Good luck!!!!

              Originally posted by acme:
              To SZVook
              What do you mean by this? Are you saying to make up 1/4" jack to jack leads to specific lengths and then loam them together?
              Thanks
              Dean



              ------------------
              szvook
              Studio

              Comment


              • #8
                I performed a similar exercise with my V customs last week.

                I bought a 3m length of the flexible split 20mm conduit (I didn't need it all). I fastened it to the rack (from the brain, around the top bar to the 'floor' tom) and marked the points at which the individual cables needed to leave the conduit.

                I then individually fed each cable in, leaving about 150mm hanging out at each pad and any slack at the brain end.

                Once all the cables were in there (I put my master out's to PM3 and PM3 speaker cables in there too) I fastened cable ties around the 'snake' at either side of every cable that came out - to prevent them moving about. I didn't put the power cable in the loom, 'cause you never know where the power is going to be!

                Leaving enough slack on the corners (so the rack can still fold) I fastened the snake to the rack with heavy-duty cable ties. I then used a previously posted tip: I cut a 350mm of length of conduit to contain the 'slack' left at the brain end. This has been fastened to the first piece of snake that leaves the brain along the arm (with HH on)

                I found the Roland supplied cables to be adequate for the job. To finish the job off (well, actually I did this first), I used different coloured cable ties on each cable (one on each jack) to identify each cable.

                All in all, this was a fiddly job, and took a couple or three hours . . . but it's worth it. I now have a very tidy rack, with colour coded cables and all for about $30 (Australian).

                Just my story
                Andy
                TD-20, Pair of JBL-Eon15 G2's & Sub

                Check out the demo tracks to hear my V's at

                http://www.thebrokenangelband.co.uk/

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