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amateur drummer. single or double pedal?

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  • amateur drummer. single or double pedal?

    Just wanted opinions really. There is a great deal on a single tamaTama Iron Cobra Rolling Glide pedal at the moment in my local shop. As an amateur is it worth waiting and saving up for the double version or go for it and get a double later when I have improved a bit?
    Roland TD8KV with TD-10 Expanded Brain. KT-10. PD-120. PD-100 x 2. PD-80 x 2. Extra CY-12 cymbal. VH-11. TDM-10, NE-10. Korg PA-800. Roland XP-30. Yamaha Clavinova CLP-970. Mackie Mixing desk. Genelec Monitors.

  • #2
    I personally think a double would get in the way of learning.
    unless you only play the type of music that requires it.
    "It makes sense if you dont think about it"

    Mimic Pro, SPD-SX, 2-QSC K-10s, K-sub, Yamaha mixer, and a bunch of other expensive cool things!

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    • #3
      What do your feet tell you? What are your needs?
      Alan
      ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      website | youtube | facebook | group | newsletter | message | recommendations

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      • #4
        Beware - old drummer post ahead...

        Do you want to play double kick? If so, then save for the double (or you may be able to get a used previous generation Iron Cobra double for the same price as a new current gen one). If you DON'T want to play double kick then just get the single. If you don't know, then get the single and decide if you want the double or not a few months down the line. Simples...

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        • #5
          I want to learn double eventually but I am very aware that I need to practice a lot. My feet tell me I still have a lot to learn lol.
          Roland TD8KV with TD-10 Expanded Brain. KT-10. PD-120. PD-100 x 2. PD-80 x 2. Extra CY-12 cymbal. VH-11. TDM-10, NE-10. Korg PA-800. Roland XP-30. Yamaha Clavinova CLP-970. Mackie Mixing desk. Genelec Monitors.

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          • #6
            If you desire to play it in the future, then go ahead and purchase a double - but only setup and use the single for a while. When you feel proficient on single, then hook up the rest.
            Alan
            ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            website | youtube | facebook | group | newsletter | message | recommendations

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Alan VEX View Post
              If you desire to play it in the future, then go ahead and purchase a double - but only setup and use the single for a while. When you feel proficient on single, then hook up the rest.
              It's what I did - started with a single - added the double -- but broke my left ankle, now back to the single....

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              • #8
                I really don't see how getting a double pedal would get in the way of learning proper single foot technique.. Just plan accordingly and split practice time based on where you want to go!

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                • #9
                  Yep..get the double since that's where you want to be anyway. Besides all else that was mentioned, buying the double to begin with will save you cash and the hassle of selling the single later.
                  8 piece DIY Acrylic, 2x2Box DrumIt5, Gen16 4xDCP, DIY Acrylic&Gen16 Conversions, Sleishman Twin-QuadSteele hybrid, Gibraltar&DrumFrame rack, DW9502LB, Midi Knights Pro Lighting
                  http://www.airbrushartists.org/DreamscapeAirbrushRealm

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                  • #10
                    Double even if you have to grow into it, and if you go for a chain style pedal the double chains as opposed to single are not that much more and perform better

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                    • #11
                      I'd like to chime in and say; you don't have to go double. You could in fact start with a single, then add another single and another kick trigger. Using a drum splitter if you have no spare inputs, or a block or cowbell under your left foot.
                      ◾ Diamond Drums 4pc in Di-Noc carbon ◾ MegaDRUM
                      ◾ Roland UA-1010 / cymbals / KT-10 (x2) ◾ Tama / Gibraltar hardware ◾ JBL LSR3 Series 2.1 Monitoring ◾ Pearl THMP-1
                      PA Comparison Sheet

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Kabonfaiba View Post
                        I'd like to chime in and say; you don't have to go double. You could in fact start with a single, then add another single and another kick trigger. Using a drum splitter if you have no spare inputs, or a block or cowbell under your left foot.
                        Kabonfalba - This is a really VALUABLE piece of input (no pun)!

                        You've got me thinking .... the only reason electronic drummers who want to go double pedal typically mess around with those double-pedal linkages between two kick pedals is because that's how it's done in the physical (acoustic) world.

                        But using a logical/virtual connection to the module instead makes so much more sense... providing greater flexibility as to precise placement. It's also cheaper, and can more easily be repurposed and/or reconfigured later down the road.

                        What's more, if I understand your comment about the use of a splitter, you wouldn't need to fuss with two beaters vying for the same kick trigger... instead you can put the other (extra) kick pedal anywhere you want with one of those mini-trigger pads attached, run the 1/4" phono cable from that pedal's jack into the splitter, and then merge the signals from the two independent kick pedals jointly into the module input for the kick trigger. Is that what you're describing?

                        Until now I've shied away from going double kick and have stuck with single pedal - which also has some musical/playing chop-building benefits - but your idea is giving me pause to consider playing with the double kick possibilities for a much lower commitment of equipment, cost and hassle. Hmmm... thanks for the great idea! - OneWatt

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Felk View Post
                          I really don't see how getting a double pedal would get in the way of learning proper single foot technique.. Just plan accordingly and split practice time based on where you want to go!
                          Obviously, if you buy a new single pedal now, then sell it and buy a new double pedal later, you've spent extra money.
                          So I would suggest buying a double pedal.

                          Do you have a drum teacher to help you structure your practice sessions?
                          I have heard that sometimes a drummer will use a double pedal to compensate for inadequate single foot technique.
                          I wonder what the people here think re: this, but I would say that, in general, if you're playing just quick 2 notes in a row, you should learn to do it first on a single pedal. This keeps your left foot free to control the hi hat. (I'm out of practice now, but I used to be able to play a samba at 140 bpm comfortably -- the base drum on the last 16th note and the first note of each quarter note. I imagine this is pretty standard).

                          You also want to be sure that you are not playing the kind of thing that requires a double pedal with music that is usually played with a single pedal. I imagine too many cluttered base drum notes could turn off other musicians. One thing I wish I had learned earlier is to write out the bass drum groove for the verse, chorus, bridge, etc., give a copy to the bassist, and basically stick to it, no matter what my other limbs were doing. It's this kind of thing that will get you gigs. Through most of the time I was drumming seriously, I varied the bass drum groove too much.

                          Good luck.

                          Edit: I do not own an electronic drum kit yet, so I don't know what others are saying about just adding another trigger for a second bass drum pedal. But it sounds like a good idea to me.
                          Last edited by Ripple7; 08-25-14, 12:40 PM.

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                          • #14
                            I agree....get the double. You don't HAVE to use it, but you can if the urge or need arises! But now that you're looking into doubles, better make sure it matches your needs...are you a home noodler or death metal fanatic? All pedals are NOT created equal..better get one fast and smooth enough for your needs. Start trying some on for size!

                            K
                            My bands: Alter Ego, Arcanum
                            E Kit = Roland TDW-20s kit // Roland SPD-S// Pearl Demon Drives//
                            A Kit = Tama Swingstar 5 pc (1981) w/roto toms (orig owner!) //Zildjians
                            A Kit = Natal 6 pc with Paiste 2000 & Zildjian/MidiKNights/DrumSplitters

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                            • #15
                              The new Roland KT-10 pedal has an extra input so you can join two together and they then act as a double kick pedal.
                              Roland TD8KV with TD-10 Expanded Brain. KT-10. PD-120. PD-100 x 2. PD-80 x 2. Extra CY-12 cymbal. VH-11. TDM-10, NE-10. Korg PA-800. Roland XP-30. Yamaha Clavinova CLP-970. Mackie Mixing desk. Genelec Monitors.

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