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"How many licks does it take..."

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  • "How many licks does it take..."

    OK, so I don't want to know how to get to the center of a Tootsie Pop. "How many Hits does it take"...to wear out a V drum or V cymbal? I recently purchased a V Session kit and I love playing REAL Hard. However, sometimes I feel I could be playing it too Hard...Is there such a thing? How long would it take Keith Moon to wear out a V kit?(If he were still alive and would not kick and through the kit around)

  • #2
    ~~~Vdrums are immortal~~~
    P.
    Nabil

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    • #3
      I've had mine long enough to take a stab at life expectancy. The drums themselves are smaller and thicker than most acoustics and braced. They should last indefinitely with sensible care. The foam trigger cones wear pretty quick, but are cheap enough to replace. The heads (unless abused) should last longer than acoustic heads (and there are no bottom heads to match up).

      There are two aspects that are not so rosy unfortunately. The first is the hardware (much improved on the Session kit over other models), but if you are moving the set a lot you may encounter failures so have backups ready, or better yet, replace at least the clamps, if not everything, with Gibraltar. The second is the module, like all things electronic, there will be something much better in the not too distant future, no matter what you buy. (The electronics themselves require a little common sense care, but do not appear to be too delicate to be roadworthy if you take sensible care.)

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      • #4
        Dr. K,
        What's your definition of "wear out pretty quickly" regarding life expectancy of foam trigger cones? I've had my V-Customs almost two years and treat it with TLC. Do the cones just naturally deteriorate (dry out and pulverize)? Should they be inspected regularly or will I notice some sort of problem with response and sensitivity? I move my rig at least once a week. The beauty of the V-Customs is that I don't have to break down the kit. I have wheels on the original rack (and I've only had one clamp break so far), fold down the cymbal arms and fold in the side rails. The TD-8 goes into a padded bag and I'm off. It fits into the back of a Grand Caravan perfectly. The wheels align with the rear seat tracks on the floor and the rear shoulder harnesses loop around the rack and hold it securely. I haven't used any heavier sticks than "Ghosts" or "Steve Gadds" and adjusted to a lighter touch since converting to V's. Maybe this has contributed to the longevity of my kit. I know of a guy who says he constantly has to replace the triggers in his PD-7's. He's a heavy hitter.
        I still think we should get an Atlanta users group together.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by rsanto:
          The beauty of the V-Customs is that I don't have to break down the kit. I have wheels on the original rack (and I've only had one clamp break so far), fold down the cymbal arms and fold in the side rails.

          What did you do to put wheels on it? Do you keep them on when you play? Could you give me some more details on them please. The only trouble I have is my rack when moving it around town.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by rsanto:
            Dr. K,
            What's your definition of "wear out pretty quickly" regarding life expectancy of foam trigger cones? I've had my V-Customs almost two years and treat it with TLC. Do the cones just naturally deteriorate (dry out and pulverize)? Should they be inspected regularly or will I notice some sort of problem with response and sensitivity? I move my rig at least once a week. The beauty of the V-Customs is that I don't have to break down the kit. I have wheels on the original rack (and I've only had one clamp break so far), fold down the cymbal arms and fold in the side rails. The TD-8 goes into a padded bag and I'm off. It fits into the back of a Grand Caravan perfectly. The wheels align with the rear seat tracks on the floor and the rear shoulder harnesses loop around the rack and hold it securely. I haven't used any heavier sticks than "Ghosts" or "Steve Gadds" and adjusted to a lighter touch since converting to V's. Maybe this has contributed to the longevity of my kit. I know of a guy who says he constantly has to replace the triggers in his PD-7's. He's a heavy hitter.
            I still think we should get an Atlanta users group together.
            I can't really quantify it, the cones just seem to be one of the parts most prone to wearing first. I too have adjusted to a little lighter technique on the Vs although I am accused of being a rather heavy hitter nonetheless. Avoiding direct center hits will help prolong the life. I wouldn't worry about replacement unless and until you start experiencing triggering glitches. I have not had mine two years yet, but already the cones show some signs of wear. Even back when I swapped out heads, I could see that the cone on the snare was more worn than the cone on tom 4 for instance, so I swapped them. (Rotating the position of the drums/cones is another way to maximize the lifespan).

            Depending on how much you play and how hard you hit, maybe the cones will last you a couple more years or more, for others, they may go quicker. I don't anticipate having to replace any of mine for at least another year or two, but I have a spare one of just about everything (including one of the new cones) just in case of a surprise failure.

            No need to be overly concerned about it, if they are working fine, they are probably fine. I'd say at least look at them every 6 months or so comparing the snare with one or more of the others if you really want to avoid letting one get worn disproportionately.

            I have noticed quite a few Atlanta dwellers here too.

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            • #7
              Most intelligent drummers realize that e-drums are not going to handle quite the same level of physical "abuse" as acoustics. It's insane to hit them too hard. Nobody should have to hit them hard enough to consider possible damage to them.
              "I'm not a guitarist, but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night!"

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              • #8
                FDrmr,
                The V-Custom rack has rubber "feet" that have to be removed before Gibraltar rack wheels will fit over the edges of the base rails. I had to adjust for the 3" or so height that the wheels add by sliding everything down a bit. For me, that left about 6" free at the top of the veritcal rails, a sturdy spot to grab for picking the kit up or mounting my PM-3 speakers.

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                • #9
                  Where can I find Gibraltar rack wheels. That might be something I could use for my heavy and bulky concert rack.

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                  • #10
                    FDrmr,
                    The Gibraltar rack caster is #PA278 and you can take a look at it at the Interstate Music website. Looks like they'll only work on the V-Custom and V-Club racks with horizontal rails and not the bigger Pro, Concert and Session racks with veritical rails.

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