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Using a BBE

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  • Using a BBE

    When using compressors and BBE's, which should be first in the signal chain, the BBE or the Compressor? I am using a TD10-exp on a Concert kit.

    Thanks,

    Joe
    V-Concert, Visu-Lite Cymbals, BBE 482's, Behringer Multicom, Alesis D5

  • #2
    Hey Joe,
    (suddenly I feel poetic),
    As per Szvook.
    Many topics on this one and you may as well get it in his words... Search time.

    Comment


    • #3
      I've got my compression before the BBE in my setup. I've got the BBE set up as the last processor in my signal chain.

      Having said that, I'm not sure whether its "right" or not, but it seems to work well enough for me.

      Comment


      • #4
        I tried to do a search, but searching through all the posts was getting me no where, which is why I posted the question. I know that Szvook got everyone on the BBE's, he should be getting a commission. I did find where he goes directly into a BBE then to a compounder, but I am not sure what a compounder is.

        Normally the sequence is compressor first like Schuh Man does it, but since I saw how Szvook did it, I was wondering how others were hooking them up.

        Joe
        V-Concert, Visu-Lite Cymbals, BBE 482's, Behringer Multicom, Alesis D5

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        • #5
          Well, nobody got me on the BBE bandwagon. I've always been on it. But is it necessary to also get a compressor?
          "I'm not a guitarist, but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night!"

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          • #6
            The compounder: http://www.focusrite.com/products/platinum/p3.html
            is my compressor, which I use for my kick and my snare. Best money I spend!

            In theory, the compression should go before a signal processor (BBE), but in some cases
            having it afterwards also works well for some. I have my set up right now with my BBE before the Compounder and it works quite well. I will be changing it around and I will put the Compounder first and give it a try. Generally, a signal should be tightened through compression first to strength it, bring out the punch and then enhanced by a BEE or other signal processors. I did set up my rig a long time ago and at that time I wanted to try something different (that is the beauty of signal processors, you might find something new that works in a new way) that is why I tried to put my BBE first. I felt the sounds needed to be enhanced dynamically first, then compressed and my good friend/audio engineer mentioned that trying different daisy chain patches will work as well and many engineers will try a different /approach way to get a unique response/result, but he and I know that the rule of thumb is compression is first. But if the results are good either way, keep what you have and if not switch them around as long as the results suit you and especially the sounds you are working with.

            With compression, certain punch can be given to the sounds, but compression IMHO is for the people that want to have compression for their musical needs. Not all want to have/use compression, they claim that the sounds loose dynamics and the sounds are over compressed. But with a good compressor that does not color the sounds, the results for edrums can be noticed and more importantly FELT. Roland did not put a compressor in the modules for nothing, but the internal compressor does not cut, only an outboard compressor will give a user favorable results with a professional quality.

            Compression can be used for any application, but you have to know when to stop so the sounds do not get squashed. Using a BBE in conjunction with a compressor will result in very dynamic drums/cymbals with a very strong punch. This way you do not have to compress the sound(s) very much, thus keeping the sounds true. For the kicks, the BBE with compression gives any kick(s) life and here is where I use the compressor a bit more then anywhere else.


            ------------------
            szvook
            Studio

            Comment


            • #7
              With all the features on the Focusrite Compounder, is it necessary to have the BBE and the Compounder? If only one is affordable, which should I get?
              "I'm not a guitarist, but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night!"

              Comment


              • #8
                It is not necessary per say, its up to you as far as what you need more.

                The Compouder does have the bass expander, which can substitute for the BBE a bit, but not entirely and then it still depends on you and what you need. The Compounder is strong enough (and then some) to be used for bass expansion, but the BBE is a different animal and works on a different principle. The BBE works a bit differently when it comes to dynamics then the Compouder and I would recommend getting it first (especially when it comes to $, the Compounder is not cheap, although your compressor of choice might not cost as much) and if you need/want to add compression, then get a compressor later on. For my music style, I need/want compression so I got the Compounder to work with my BBE, and by combining the two I have a lot of headroom for dynamics, clarity and punch to the sounds and never push my outboard gear.

                Compression is still preferred by many in the industry, maybe not many have tried it with edrums but from my perspective using a compressor for edrums allows a user to level the playing fields (and raise them in some cases) between the acoustic & edrums. Since most people feel that the edrums lack the punch and dynamics of acoustics, having a compressor in conjunction with the BBE (or signal processor of choice) will help a lot to bring out the potential of the sounds.


                ------------------
                szvook
                Studio

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