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what should i do?

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  • what should i do?

    Hey everyone, I'm at college and only have a practice pad since drums and dorms don't mix. I'm thinking of selling my acoustic drums and getting v-drums for when i move into an apartment next year. One problem though, i'm worried that when my band finishes finding band members and start playing in clubs, i'll wish that I hadn't sold my acoustics. How are the v-drums live and for playing out? What should i do? Thanks.

    [This message has been edited by LIVEfreak (edited January 10, 2001).]

  • #2
    That's exactly what I did. The only problem is that you don't get the same satisfaction from hitting them, and there's really no point at hitting them like acoustic drums either. It's a demotivator for practice.. but they are convenient.

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    • #3
      Since no one has replied you...
      I don't own a V-drum but I have a TD7(since 1995) instead and also a Tama Rockstar(since 1992)
      I would suggest not selling your Acoustic set and try to save up for your V-drum. You could also search for "acoustic drums" on this site
      and there is also a topic on what V-drummers had done with their acoustics.
      Besides the comments in this site, you might also want to find out what your band wants,
      would they accept playing with e-drums? I know my sister-in-law didn't want me playing e-drums for her wedding, although I used e-drums in my own wedding....

      Fon

      Fon.

      TD8 with PD7's, 2 KD7's (From previous TD7)
      Tama Rockstar with mix of Sabian, Zildjian and Paiste.

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      • #4
        If you would like to keep your acoustics and be able to play them quietly you might think about adding mesh heads and triggering them. Also picking up some ecymbals. This way you always have the option to go back to acoustic if need be. I've gone this route and I've really enjoyed it.

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        • #5
          It depends on what sounds and functionallity you want to use.

          Some people call the electronic drum kit a different instrument but as long as we all search for real drum sounds and real drum functions - like hihat and rim shot possibilities - in our e-drums, I don't think it is. Nevertheless, with e-drums it sometimes is hard to immitate acoustic drums from function, sound and feel.

          In a way e-drums sound and feel like acoustic drums when they are run through a sound system. To me this is a kind of " electronic/ processed " sound too since not much from the acoustic character/drum signal is left when using mikes, tone control, compression and the additional colour from amplifiers and loudspeakers. If you like such a live or studio drum sound and if you can handle them with a decent sound system (important) even in small clubs, then e-drums are good for live use. E-drums even have the advantage that you can lower the volume. Good for small clubs and cafees. And e-drums are always handy for practice at home. But if you want a pure acoustic feel and sound, then don't sell your acoustic kit. But remember that only a pure acoustic drum sound is achieved when the kit is set up at home or in a drum shop. As I said before: in most live and studio situations miked acoustic drums already sound as close as e-drums will.

          Hopes this helps.
          Robert

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          • #6
            canīt really say, an acoustic drum in an studio situation sounds alike an e-drum almost.

            have just purchased a tdw1 upgraded td10, but as far as i see, acoustic drums in a studio situation always sound better, as long as there is a professionell periphery as good mikes, good mixing desk, and good effcts (and good recording devices at any rate).

            in a cheap home recording studio you might not hear the difference.

            so there is always enough reason to keep an acoustic set.

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            • #7
              There are two things to consider.
              Firstly your band will nedd a powerful PA to get the best out of the V Drums.
              And secondly buying the V Drums is not the end of it. You will need bloody good monitors to truely get the best back from the V Drums on stage.

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              • #8
                Keep your acoustics. If you sell them you will most likely do it at a loss. If you buy e-drums and love them so much that you will never want to play acoustics again, then sell them. I personaly like having both sets.


                Kurt
                Kurt

                Pearl drums converted with hart adc, roland kd7's, pd 120 for snare, various roland rubber pads, hart e cymbals and pads, td8, td6, 2 mackie srm450s and mackie sub. mackie sr 24-4 mixer........and always growing.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Spides:
                  There are two things to consider ... a powerful PA ... bloody good monitors ...
                  One more if your really bold ...

                  electric sticks.

                  (sorry peoples)
                  ~~~~
                  -

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