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Background noise TD 10

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  • Background noise TD 10

    I am experiencing a lot of background noise on the main audio outputs of my TD 10 when I am not playing. Do anyone else have this problem?

  • #2
    I bought myself a V-Concert set a couple weeks ago and am having the same noise. As soon as I start playing, the noise goes away. We are in the studio right now and it drives the sound guy nuts. I doesn't come thru in the recording, but I'd like to find a way to get rid of the noise. HELP !!

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    • #3
      How strong is your Master Out signal? When I first got my TD-10 I had this problem. I found it was caused by sending a weak signal out of the TD-10. I cranked it up and never had the problem again.

      Other things to check are long unbalanced runs from TD to amp or FOH. Cheap cords. Electrical interference. ...
      Kit Pic 1 Kit Pic 2 Kit Pic 3... And FOR SALE I have: 3 PD-9's, MDS-10 purple rack w/cables/pad and cym mounts. See classified posts for details or PM me.

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      • #4
        I've had a "hiss" in my td-10 on every out put. I've had it for about 3 years now. I'ts never been a major problem though.

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        • #5
          60 cycle hum/hiss is the scourge of civilized man and can be caused by anything. Most of the time it's a ground problem when you're using alot of patch cords (ie:electronic drums), sometimes outputs can be too hot, impedence wise, here's a good place to start though, Ebtech Hum Eliminator, it lifts gound loops http://www.prosound.com/pages/page90.htm It's usually not the cause of the unit's outputs, I've heard from techs I know that the TD10 has +4db outputs, which is very good so I doubt very much that your module is the actual cause unless there's something wrong with it. Make sure you discharge your body's static build up before you touch anything inside of the unit. You can do this by either wearing a wrist band or by simply touching something with iron in it, the rack is aluminum, so don't use it for this purpose.

          [This message has been edited by jrcel (edited September 27, 2001).]
          Drumkat Turbo 4.5, Emulator X3, Superior 2.1, Roland Fantom XR, DTXtreme III, SPD-20 etc.......

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          • #6
            I get much less "hiss" when I turn the volume on the brain down and the volume on the amp up.

            ------------------
            Drooling Dog
            - Scott

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Drooling Dog:
              I get much less "hiss" when I turn the volume on the brain down and the volume on the amp up.

              Interesting. I'm wondering if it is a function of the TD/Amp combination plus some of the other things mentioned above. There might not be a standard answer to this one.

              Jonber: What are you plugged into?
              Kit Pic 1 Kit Pic 2 Kit Pic 3... And FOR SALE I have: 3 PD-9's, MDS-10 purple rack w/cables/pad and cym mounts. See classified posts for details or PM me.

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              • #8
                Boingo,

                I think it's pretty common with musical instruments in general. My bass player actually just taught me this last week.

                ------------------
                Drooling Dog
                - Scott

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                • #9
                  Try using a DI(Direct) box and lift the ground. That helps with our singers effect unit someplaces the XLR out is quite other places we need to hook it to the DI box and lift the ground. Another thing if you are using a TD-8 with the wall wart plug moving that away from the brain may help ellimnate some of the humm.

                  ------------------
                  Ted H.
                  www.tocsinrocks.com
                  Ted H.

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                  • #10
                    I have the same problem, except it only occurs on the direct outs. HOWEVER this has only started happening recently, it certainly wasn't there when I was recording a short time ago.
                    I haven't had time yet to sit down and nut it out but will do shortly. Will let you know of anything I find.
                    Steve

                    'I only ever quote myself - except when I quote someone else' - me

                    , plenty of , and , , triggered acoustics, , and a plethora of PA blah blah freakin blah...I mean does anyone care about the specifics of pedals, speakers, processors, hardware or anything that I'm using?? :confused: Hmmm, maybe this is an appropriate place to mention that I tried out a new cymbal stand the other day...

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                    • #11
                      I have a td-30 kit and a TD-27/VAD 506 in a studio using the Master L/R outs into a Behringer X32. They both use dual Radial direct boxes before they hit the mixer. This is essential, as far as I am concerned, as the noise and transients are virtually eliminated, along with humming and other grounding and impedence problems.

                      Each kit also had a pair of Simmons drum monitors. The SImmons have a direct box built in, but I do not use them. The Radial direct box allows a pass-through, which goes to the monitors, the TD-27 mains go to the input and a balanced stereo pair is sent to 2 channels of the mixer.

                      This typical setup will work with any mixer, but the X32 has so many other instruments attached that a Radial is used for every instrument that has a line output. We never have to use Direct boxes for vocal audio,(mics) except for anything that pre-processes sound like chorus and vocoders. The X32 is interfaced to a Cakewalk DAW via X-USB-32.

                      This is an ultimate solution, but we found that we could never count on any electrical system being quiet all the time. Everything you add in a studio and every sound input causes differences that add up. You can spend hours chasing hum and hiss, but if you eliminate the possibilites at the source, by using direct boxes, it gives you so much more time to concentrate on the bands music and recording. I hope this testimony helps someone!!!
                      Last edited by charlyv; 01-25-22, 09:23 AM.

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