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  • industrial

    I was sondering if anyone wth a td8 can help me out. I just joined an industrial band and they are not happy with my set up, so I was wondering if anyone with a td8 can help me out and figure out what sounds onthe td8 i can use. I would be grateful.

  • #2
    Define Industrial...

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    • #3
      What type of industrial are you playing? Goth-Industrial, NIN-type Industrial-Metal, Neubauten-type Industrial, Powernoise, or what?
      I use a TD-10ex, and the last few concerts I've done I've left my rack home and used nothing but a Handsonic, so I'd say you can get Industrial-esque sounds out of anything. BTW, I play Goth-Industrial.

      The only tip I can give you is ask your bandmates for reference recordings, study the sounds on those recordings and try to reproduce them with your TD-8. It's not impossible, in fact it's not too difficult either, it's just time-consuming. You'll get pretty close with just the onboard effects as well, as long as you aren't playing Powernoise.

      Stu
      "Fry that sound effect, Moriarty, we're having it for breakfast"

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      • #4
        I have a TD-10x, so bear with me.

        There are several effects sounds that might help. That much is obvious. However, by adjusting pitch and decay parameters to acoustic sounds -- especially cymbals -- you get good metallic effects.

        A low-pitch cymbal sound makes for nice ambient metal sound. A higher-pitched ride bell with a short decay, played with 16th-type rolls... old drum machine sounds -- 808, 909's -- are also useful, if adjusted properly. Some of those goofy noise effects can be striking if lowered/raised, decay shortened (typically extending decay does not help these sounds).

        I've also messed around with using electronic/cymbal/effects-sounds played with brushes; these allows for a dense, machine-gun triggering on two pads at once, which can create a white noise effect.

        All this can be enhanced by on-board effects, such as reverbs, gates, non-linear, flange, etc. But I'm not sure what the TD-8 has in way of effects.

        And throw in the pitch control on the hi-hat pedal....does the TD-8 have this?

        DJourg

        PS: I was in a very short-lived industrial band with my old Roland pads and an Alesis D-4...they weren't so concerned with the sounds as the looks of the kit...may this be part of your bandmates' problem?

        PSS : Mcconaghy, I thought I was familiar with industrial music but I've never heard of 'Powernoise'. Must be after my time. Can you give me some info on that particular genre?

        [This message has been edited by DJourg (edited August 06, 2001).]

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        • #5
          Powernoise is the term describing projects like Imminent Starvation and Noisex, i.e. distorted drumbeats with a few sound effects on top and not much to no melodic content. Quite nice to dance to, but very tedious to listen to. It's sort of the Gabber of Industrial, albeit slower, at between 110 and 130 BPM.
          There's not a lot I can recommend listening to, as I'm not a fan of this type of Industrial at all, but I think Imminent Starvation is a good example.
          Us Goth-Industrialists tend to use the term Powernoise, whereas the Powernoise scene describes themselves as Pure Industrial.

          Stu

          BTW, I agree with DJourg, part of your bandmate's problem may be the look of the kit. Try draping transparent plastic foil around your rack bars on stage, it's a cheap effect, but effective under lighting.
          "Fry that sound effect, Moriarty, we're having it for breakfast"

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          • #6
            yeah i'm looking for NIN type stuff. Please help. I'm in dire need.

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            • #7
              This is exactly why I kept my Simmons SDS-7, and still use in our music.

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              szvook

              [This message has been edited by szvook (edited August 06, 2001).]
              Studio

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              • #8
                Again, sit down with some NIN, Ministry, :Wumpscut:, Front Line Assembly albums, and just go through your sounds, tweaking as you go, until you can duplicate the sounds you're hearing. Listen exactly to the sounds Trent Reznor, Al Jourgenson and Rudy Ratzinger are using, and what do you hear? Can you find similar sounds, even remotely related, in your TD-8? I bet you can. Mix and match sounds, like an analog snare with a deep 909 kick, 808 and 909 hihats. Detune handclaps and use them as snares. Play with the decay values, pitch, any parameter you can access. Try out all the different onboard effects, see what they do to your sound. Listen to your band's material, and try to tune kits to the songs. Ask your band what exactly they're looking for from you, sound-wise. Get some constructive comments from them, "your current sounds suck" isn't constructive, it's a cop-out answer, so don't let them give you a run-around. You're a band, you're a unit, you're supposed to work together. Especially get your main songwriting chap or programmer to work on the final tweaking of your sounds. A lot here may resent that idea, I think it's important in oder to make the band sound like a homogenous unit, and not a collection of individual musicians who just happen to be playing together.
                That's the only good way to do it, and it'll help you get to know your TD-8 better as well. It's much better than anyone just telling you to tweak snare so-and-so in this-and-that way. Most great sounds are found by trial-and-error anyway, and it's more fun this way, too.

                Well, that was bit of personal philosophy thrown in there for good measure, I hope this helps, as vague as this is. I am deliberately vague with telling you how to tweak things, cause I don't think you'll learn how to operate your TD-8 otherwise. Jump in the water and learn to swim, you're playing a style of music with no rules, mate, enjoy it!

                Stu

                P.S. The only rule in any type of Industrial is to not sound like Filter, coz they suck
                "Fry that sound effect, Moriarty, we're having it for breakfast"

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                • #9
                  funny when i was introduced to "industrial" in the easly 80's it was a guy hiting a chunk of iron with a hammer, miked thru a delay into a P.A. I guess i lost it when it became teen pop. (see list of groups above)

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                  • #10
                    Great suggestions Stu. I'm not really into the industrial thing, but I do like to have as many unique-sounding kits as possible. And sometimes if you can't duplicate a sound exactly, you will end up with something even better just by trying.

                    Originally posted by mcconaghy:
                    Try draping transparent plastic foil around your rack bars on stage, it's a cheap effect, but effective under lighting.

                    Roland TD-20 v1.08, various v-drums and v-cymbals, Yamaha KP65's, Axis pedals, Gibraltar hardware, Mackie 1202/SRM450 (pre-china)

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by cpgrossman:
                      funny when i was introduced to "industrial" in the easly 80's it was a guy hiting a chunk of iron with a hammer, miked thru a delay into a P.A. I guess i lost it when it became teen pop. (see list of groups above)
                      Ahh, EinstŁrzende Neubauten... shopping carts with guitar pickups and stuff like that... those were the days.

                      Stu
                      "Fry that sound effect, Moriarty, we're having it for breakfast"

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                      • #12
                        My friend in S.F. still goes out with a portable DAT recorded and a metal stick to a junkyard and beats the living heck out of everything in sight and gets great sounds to work with for his industrial drum sounds.

                        Iím thinking of doing the same thing and also going to a lumber house and record some sounds from that kind of material. Various kinds of wood plus their dimensions can resound interesting sounds.


                        ------------------
                        szvook
                        Studio

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Harlock:
                          Don't you use any sounds from the TD-8?
                          I think I misconstrued my point.

                          I use my TD-8 and SDS-7 98% of the time and my sampler on occasion for loops. I want to get unique sounds for my sampler and going out and sampling sounds from various sources to build a library of sounds is what I meant.

                          My friend also has the Vís Ė TD-8 & 10, he just wants sounds that most people donít have and I am the same way. So a portable DAT and the right/unique sound source can yield interesting results.


                          ------------------
                          szvook

                          [This message has been edited by szvook (edited August 09, 2001).]
                          Studio

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