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How to solve resonating sounds/frequencies

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  • How to solve resonating sounds/frequencies

    Lately I'm using my Roland amp again, after several months of using headphones only. Probably because of the position in the corner low to the floor, I get an annoying resonating sound when I hit the highest tom for almost every kit I try. It seems the sound of that tom has the frequency at which the room 'resonates' if you know what I mean. As a result, it sounds about twice as loud as all other sounds.

    Here's a picture of my setup:



    I placed the amp on some foam to isolate it, but that didn't solve it. I also tried moving it around, but that affected the high frequencies. A PM-30 would solve that, but I don't want to spend anything at the moment.

    Anyone any ideas?
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Sticking any speaker in the corner of a room will tend to change it's performance, but normally it makes them bassy. For this reason I'm surprised it's the top tom that is resonating.

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    • #3
      I played at a church thing a couple months ago with my a-kit. It was in the basement of the church and every time the bass player played an A it sounded 5 times louder than any other note. We also found out that my high tom was tuned to an A and it too sounded extremely loud.
      Try tuning that tom thats giving you trouble either a half note higher or lower, might solve your problem.

      Jeff
      TD-8
      PD-105bk
      4-PD-8's
      KD-8
      FD-8
      3-CY-8's

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      • #4
        The lower toms resonate a lot in our church's sound system in our large auditorium, and in my little amp in my small studio as well. I would guess it has mostly to do with the natural resonant frequencies of the speaker cone and cabinet (said Capain Obvious). You can turn down the toms or tweak the EQ, but those are the only remedies I am aware of. It seems to me that any speaker and cabinet system is going to have an optimum resonant frequency, and when you hit that note, it's going to amplify it with greater efficiency than other notes.
        Id rather be told the ugly truth than handed a pretty lie.

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        • #5
          I tried adjusting the tuning of the highest tom but that didn't solve it to my likings: I had to tune it down to the frequency of the 2nd tom or up so much that it didn't fit in with the other toms.

          Also, the TD-9 sounds great through my headphones and on my KRK's. They don't if I tweak the kits to sound good on the amp. Maybe placing some kind of foam to the wall or reflective materials could do the trick?

          Comment


          • #6
            Every speaker/cabinet has a frequency at which it is most efficient(loudest). As previously stated, the location of your cabinet in the corner will tend to make it more bassy, which is great for that little speaker if you are trying to get the most bottom-end out of it. It will also change the resonant frequencies as perceived by the listener. The room size/dimension and the location of the cabinet is causing your problem. Also, the location of your ears(i.e. - Where you sit) has a big effect on what you hear.

            The most cost-effective solution (*FREE*) is to get that speaker out of the corner. While it's there, it seems as if its resonant frequency and the potential of the room are combining, making for a "double whammy" of a problem.

            For a little money(Less than a new combo amp), you could get a graphic EQ to put inline. This way, you're able to find the exact problem frequency and dial it down until the overall response of the speaker is more even. If you go this route, make sure you get a 1/3 octave EQ (31 faders). Any less, and you may not be able to find the correct frequency.

            The foam idea? I don't think you'll see an improvement. Actually, I predict a result worse than what you have now.
            The frequency that foam affects is directly related to its thickness. If you put a bunch of foam on your walls, the high frequencies will suffer, causing the sound to appear dull and muffled. If you put a bunch of foam behind or around the speaker, you may get no change at all. In order to get foam to affect the lower range, it has to be very thick. That makes it expensive.

            Foam in moderation can be a good thing for overall sound quality, however. If your practice room has alot of parallel hard surfaces, 'some' strategically placed foam will help smooth out the sound (less bashy-crashy-ness).

            My suggestion is to move that speaker to where the music stand is in the picture. That's where drum monitors go for righties. If that doesn't work, try under the CY-5 on your right.

            Fool around with the placement a little more and let us know the outcome...
            *TDW-20* KD-8 w/Iron Cobra single, PD-125, PD-80R, VH-11, PD-8(X3), CY-12R/C, CY-8(X2), older MDS-6 rack with additional lower crossbar for support, Roc 'n' Soc Nitro, ATH-M50 and MDR-7506

            Life is a tragedy to those who feel and a comedy to those who think...

            Comment


            • #7
              Hi Soundofmind, thanks a lot for that info. I tried moving several times, but not to the more obvious place where the music stand is, because...well the music stand was there. But that seems to be a much better place for the amp, there's a lot less resonating. I had to dial in some extra bass though, but that was to be expected.

              Being a headphones player and monitor setup listener, I'm used to having the sound coming equally from the left and right which isn't the case now. Well, maybe it's just a matter of getting used to.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by eric_B View Post
                Being a headphones player and monitor setup listener, I'm used to having the sound coming equally from the left and right which isn't the case now. Well, maybe it's just a matter of getting used to.
                Get another PM-10, put it under the CY-5, and go stereo!!! You would also get more bass response due to the increased cone area. Moving much more air...

                Something to add to the Xmas list...
                *TDW-20* KD-8 w/Iron Cobra single, PD-125, PD-80R, VH-11, PD-8(X3), CY-12R/C, CY-8(X2), older MDS-6 rack with additional lower crossbar for support, Roc 'n' Soc Nitro, ATH-M50 and MDR-7506

                Life is a tragedy to those who feel and a comedy to those who think...

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by eric_B View Post
                  Hi Soundofmind, thanks a lot for that info. I tried moving several times, but not to the more obvious place where the music stand is, because...well the music stand was there. But that seems to be a much better place for the amp, there's a lot less resonating. I had to dial in some extra bass though, but that was to be expected.

                  Being a headphones player and monitor setup listener, I'm used to having the sound coming equally from the left and right which isn't the case now. Well, maybe it's just a matter of getting used to.
                  Possibly the music stand can go where the amp was in the back? I know its more of a hassle to turn the pages but it might save your neck a little wear and tear.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Soundofmind View Post
                    Get another PM-10, put it under the CY-5, and go stereo!!! You would also get more bass response due to the increased cone area. Moving much more air...

                    Something to add to the Xmas list...
                    Yeah, that would be nice. Why does improving your setup always means buying stuff?

                    Originally posted by sopranos View Post
                    Possibly the music stand can go where the amp was in the back? I know its more of a hassle to turn the pages but it might save your neck a little wear and tear.
                    Yes, I did that. To quote a famous Dutch soccer player: "Every disadvantage has its advantage". (Or was it the other way around...?)

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