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Once and for all Hotspots

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  • grog
    started a topic Once and for all Hotspots

    Once and for all Hotspots

    The most common frustration with edrums is the snare "hotspot". It makes no difference which module you're using, old or new, bottom or top end, almost everybody runs into this problem when using a mesh pad for a snare. It's causes can be just physical (the pad itself) or modular (settings, sample selection) or a combination of both. It can be maddingly tough to fix, so much so that some people have simply given up on edrums. As such, it's one of the most frequently asked questions here. The topic has been discussed at great length over the years and many people have figured out ways to eliminate the dreaded hotspot. What follows are various threads that provide the most information to enable you to get rid of the hotspot.

    Start with this one:
    https://www.vdrums.com/forum/advance...ot-spots-again

    Yes, it's long but, it's the most exhaustive look at hotspots so take some time to read through the entire thing (posts 31, 38, 43, 46, 54, 58, 77, 80, 84, 87, 94 and 107 provide the most immediate help). More importantly, if your hotspot is modular in nature, this thread has extensive settings you can try. Now, these settings for for the exp TD-10 module but, most of these settings will work on other modules. What's more, this thread has a great look at compression, another useful tool not only for hotspots but for other audio issues often encountered by edrummers.

    More background on fixing it for the exp TD-10:
    https://www.vdrums.com/forum/advance...blem-td-10-exp

    For a perspective on the differences in hardware brands on the hotspot:
    https://www.vdrums.com/forum/general...830-harts-pads

    For a discussion on settings to eliminate the hotspot on a TD-9:
    https://www.vdrums.com/forum/advance...-a-pd-105-td-9

    The TD-9 thread references a couple of mechanical things you can do to maybe, repeat, maybe, get rid of the hotspot. It also reinforces the first mechanical thing you check: the pad's cone. Worn out (or wearing out) cones and head tensioning are often the first culprit.

    UPDATE ON THE TD-9:
    http://www.vdrums.com/forum/showpost.php?p=532010
    Lots of discussion, some ideas to try. Sensitivity reduction from 8 to 5 seems your best bet with Roland pads on a TD-9.
    (Note: the above link no longer works since the migration to software. I can't find the thread via the friggin search engine so if anybody can figure out which one it is, please let us know.)

    To summarize:

    1) Check head tensioning on your pad. It needs to be tight. Some mesh pads are more susceptible to hot spots. Harts seem less than Pintech or Roland but that's just been in my experience. Don't let brands drive what you do here. If you have or like whatever mesh snare you have, stick with it. UPDATE: Member Tazed recomments the following: Pull the head off, then completely re-seated the head, then very, very carefully tensioned it and went tight, almost to the point where I thought 'I'm over doing this...'. Result. The tension lifted the head off the sensor quite a bit, and the hot spot was reduced to almost nothing.

    2) Check the cone on your pad. Worn out cones cause hotspots. Roland, Hart and Pintech sell replacement foam.

    3) Change the actual snare sample and see if that changes the hotspot dynamics or gets rid of it entirely.

    4) If all the snare samples you like have a hotspot and you've eliminated the foam and head tensioning as the culprit, dive into settings on the module. Go to the first thread listed and see what settings listed there are on your module and start tweaking.

    5) Live happily ever after!

    UPDATE: Related link if you have a TD-20:

    https://www.vdrums.com/forum/advance...miter-expander

    This deals with a preset Compressor setting on the TD-20. If you have an older module, there are no individual settings that will allow you to duplicate this. Try the preset and settings given in the above link and see if that helps. If not, plow thru all the info in the lead post on this Sticky.

    www.myspace.com/rubberuniverse

    www.myspace.com/rubberuniverse
    Last edited by grog; 08-17-16, 12:36 PM.

  • Kirk Rummelhoff
    replied
    Thanks for posting this "one and done"! I have a TD-25 KV and the snare hot spot is annoying. I have done a few things to improve it, put it is still a problem.

    I am going to dig into the links provided and see what I can do.

    Leave a comment:


  • skhan007
    replied
    I have been toying around with my settings for the ATV aD5 and found that these parameters dramatically reduce hotspots on my Tom 1, Tom 2, and floor Tom (all Roland PD with center- mounted cones). I've also REALLY tightened those mesh heads, which helped a lot.

    The only downside that I can see is reducing the sensitivity makes the toms less likely to pick up subtle hits or the stick-drop-bounce thing. For my purposes this is fine and as you can see from the graph on the left side, my hardest hits are not at the top range (ff).
    Last edited by skhan007; 04-14-18, 03:56 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • WillemV
    replied
    Definitely fixed in the TD-50.

    Leave a comment:


  • Zone47
    replied
    For me it was running a 4th tom on a TD12 module, so I had to use Aux 1 and it was set to cymbal by default. Once I set it to PD120 pad, no more hot spot!

    Leave a comment:


  • fulrmr(Daniel)
    replied
    Originally posted by bud7h4 View Post
    I've all but eliminated the hotspots on the toms, but the snare has proved more difficult. Using curve, compression and about 1.5 scan time I've made the hot spot a smaller area, but when it is hit, it's as hot and loud as ever.
    keep at it...it's do-able.

    Leave a comment:


  • bud7h4
    replied
    I've all but eliminated the hotspots on the toms, but the snare has proved more difficult. Using curve, compression and about 1.5 scan time I've made the hot spot a smaller area, but when it is hit, it's as hot and loud as ever.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tazed
    replied
    Why stuff around with patches? You can dial out the hotspot with a little research. It's well documented here...
    And, yes, I would think (as Jman experienced) that it would stuff PS up.
    PS works by reading the amplitude of the first half of the waveform over time from the head piezo. The further from the centre, the waveform changes shape from a centre-strike waveform.
    Place anything on the head that alters the head piezo waveform, and the module will misinterpret the waveform as a change in head strike position.
    The patch will cut down the flex of the head (thereby varying the signal from the piezo), most likely making the module think the head was struck further from the centre.
    It's relative, according to your adjustments, but if you want to remove a hot-spot, curve and compression work best...

    Leave a comment:


  • bud7h4
    replied
    That's good to know Jman, thanks! I would think the diameter of the patch makes a difference. Maybe the material/ thickness too? The evens patch looks much larger than the small rubber patch I ordered today. These are really small, barely larger than a thumb print. Exactly what I was hoping to find, just big enough to dampen the hot spot. I'll definately post the results.

    Leave a comment:


  • JmanWord
    replied
    If you are going to start putting dots or patches on top of your heads ...... One thing you should check closely is the affect the patch has on positional detection. I once started having problems with Positional Detection on a snare that had been working flawlessly. I took the thing apart, changed out piezo, cone... etc. etc. and still the same result. Later I was looking at my snare and remembered I had put a thin drum head patch like this one on top to give me extra protection in the center area that gets the most wear: http://www.drumsonsale.com/evans-sin...ck-p-1881.html
    Yup, turns out that single little patch totally messed up my PS.

    Leave a comment:


  • bud7h4
    replied
    Originally posted by fulrmr(Daniel) View Post
    Just mindful that you remove the head before applying one of these....wouldn't want to glue the cone to the head.
    That would be bad, lol. Thanks!

    Leave a comment:


  • fulrmr(Daniel)
    replied
    Originally posted by bud7h4 View Post
    That sounds good. I'll look into these too - thin rubber tyre patches (with tapered edges).

    http://www.amazon.com/Park-Tool-VP-1...cle+Tire+Patch

    Video (these look perfect)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...BCFHIaxGs&NR=1
    Just mindful that you remove the head before applying one of these....wouldn't want to glue the cone to the head.

    Leave a comment:


  • bud7h4
    replied
    That sounds good. I'll look into these too - thin rubber tyre patches (with tapered edges).

    http://www.amazon.com/Park-Tool-VP-1...cle+Tire+Patch

    Video (these look perfect)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...BCFHIaxGs&NR=1
    Last edited by bud7h4; 06-04-13, 12:31 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • fulrmr(Daniel)
    replied
    Originally posted by bud7h4 View Post
    Well the tape was just a quick trial to see if maybe a patch might work. I'm going to look into a proper patch - more durable and less prone to coming off. I've never seen patches for anything but bass heads, so I'm looking for one thin enough that it won't be like hitting a piece of cardboard.
    I make my own kick patches from mylar heads.(usually ones left over that I have used the hoop for my DIY mesh projects) I take the head and cut out the black dot....apply KRT(Killer Red Tape) to the back.....and then stick it to the kick mesh. Works great. It is of course very thin being made from an acoustic head so if it's cut down to a small enough "dot" to just cover the "hot spot" (1 inch...maybe smaller?)....I don't see why this would not work in the same manner as the tape you experimented with...and it should look nice too.

    Leave a comment:


  • bud7h4
    replied
    Originally posted by fulrmr(Daniel) View Post
    Hmmm...so...basically...if you cut the "length" of the strips off and just make this tape "patch" a small "dot" over the cone to "protect" or "desensitize" it....it will not only look better.... but it will cure the issue?
    Well the tape was just a quick trial to see if maybe a patch might work. I'm going to look into a proper patch - more durable and less prone to coming off. I've never seen patches for anything but bass heads, so I'm looking for one thin enough that it won't be like hitting a piece of cardboard.

    Leave a comment:

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