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TD-1 default pad sensitivity and velocity preset for Superior Drummer

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  • TD-1 default pad sensitivity and velocity preset for Superior Drummer

    Two somewhat related questions:

    I got a TD1DMK kit a little less than a year ago. When I started I made tweaks to at least the kick sensitivity on the module, if not other pads. I'm wondering about putting them back at their defaults now, as I usually run it through superior drummer for the sounds. But I don't remember what the defaults were. May I assume they were all 7? Several of the pads were at 7, two were at 9 and the kick was at 10 (I tweaked that for sure).

    Related, I have noticed that when recording via Superior in Logic, what I would consider a moderate stroke on the kick (I am a pretty new drummer so maybe I'm heavier than I think) gives me 127 velocity as a recorded MIDI note, the highest. Seems to me the highest velocity should equate to me giving it all I've got on the kick and I am definitely not doing that.

    So I'm wondering if there's a TD-1 preset or something I could load into a superior to get a better 1:1 input/out ratio, or a more realistic representation of how hard I'm actually hitting. Or at least some starting point settings for smoothing things out. I realize every drummer is different etc. But if someone has a place to start that'd be great.

    I was thinking resetting the module pads to their factory/default sensitivity would be a good starting point, hence first question.

    Thanks.

  • #2
    You have sensitivity set too high if the module is sending 127 on light hits. I wouldn’t go for factory set as it may be wrong for you. Everyone has to set sensitivity up to their own playing style. It would be rare for the out of box settings to be perfect for you.

    Is it SD3 you have as sd2 is different? If SD3 then there is already a preset for the td1. Go to midi in/e-drums and then click on the use preset and from Roland choose your kit. This is just for mapping and hi hat and is not to do with sensitivity which is adjusted on the module
    Roland TD30 module on TD20 kit SD3 with various kits. Pearl Masters Kit, Yamaha 9000RC original natural wood finish. Cymbals from Zildgian Pasite and Sabian. Loads of percussion bits. Cubase and Wavelab always current versions.

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    • #3
      Regarding the default values, I don't recall the specific values, but for sure they are between 8 and 10.


      Using the rubber pads that came with it and ezdrummer2 and when I tried Sd3, I didn't need to incrsase the sensitivity.

      ​​​​​​​
      I see that the difference from low to high volume (in terms of strength, or velocity) is narrow while using a2e kit, mainly for the floor tom.
      I had to adjust slightly the sensitivity to all the pieces. I increased the bass drum to 19. The others were kept close to the default values though.

      Ronaldo B.

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      • #4
        How do I create a new topic? I don,t see the option.

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        • #5
          Sorry friends, I just saw these replies (I thought I'd get email notifications but didn't even though I swore I'd subscribed). Thanks. I've been using SD3 on my laptop but SD2 on desktop. There is a Roland preset in SD2, didn't realize there was a preset for the actual TD1 in SD3.

          It seems to me there are two different places to adjust: you have the velocity curve as interpreted by SD and you have the sensitivity as set in the module...perhaps not exactly the same thing but related, no? If module is sending out too loud of a signal, velocities are going to be off in SD, but if you've got it tweaked just right in the module, but SD settings are wonky, seems you could still get undesired results, right?

          Also, we say it's subjective and different for each drummer, and as a new drummer (less than a year) with little to no experience on "real" drums I don't know crap about crap, but it seems, objectively that if you were to take a given acoustic snare, no matter who a drummer is, if one hits that snare X hard, the response is going to be Y loud. So I would think there'd be a way to get an objectively "correct" even response from an e kit, where how hard you hit generates a realistic velocity sample relative to what would happen in the real world with an acoustic drum.
          Last edited by TheBass; 01-15-20, 11:23 PM.

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          • #6
            Sorry friends, I just saw these replies (I thought I'd get email notifications but didn't even though I swore I'd subscribed).
            Yep. that happened to me. The default behavior is to have notifications on your profile only, but not thru e-mails, unless you check the option in your profile.

            For the drums presets on the SD2, you can also choose the hi-hat option under preferences.



            Regarding the velocity and sensitivity, this is how I understand:

            Sensitivity is how sensible the module will be for detecting the signal from the pads (piezos).
            Velocity is more related to the volume. How loud it will be.

            Once a hit is detected by the module (which was based on the sensitivity), it will assign a velocity value for that signal level (based on the velocity/curve settings).

            The independence of those settings can give you the ability to adjust the kit for the way you play (relation strenght/volume). Let's imagine that your style is to hit the pads a bit harder. You can then decrease the velocity. Or you can do the opposite for each pad.

            The TD-1 module does not have other settings than pad sensitivity and the option to choose the snare type (mesh or rubber) and the bass drum type (pedal trigger or models with beater).
            I am not 100% of sure, but if I recall correctly, you can change the MIDI note for the snare and maybe for the bass drum (only a couple of options each).

            So, for the TD-1, I see a direct relation between sensitivity to velocity as there is no way to change the velocity settings on the module itself.
            I believe that you can change it on the DAW/VST software.

            I have no much experience with DAW/VST other than setting few things for my "ears / perception" so I can't help much in terms of recommending settings.
            Ronaldo B.

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            • #7
              Thanks. I sort of get it. I thought velocity meant not just volume but a representation of how hard a drum was hit.

              I guess my next question would be do folks generally recommend tweaking the module sensitivity or the velocity curve/settings in SD to get one’s desired results? Or both?

              And also...as an inexperienced drummer, how do I know when it’s “right”, personal taste aside? Getting back to what was said above, seems like if I like to hit harder, I’d want a realistic sound relative to how hard I’m hitting...and if I don’t like it, learn to play better rather than making the drum sounds conform to my questionable technique.
              Last edited by TheBass; 01-16-20, 12:29 PM.

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              • #8
                TheBass think of your trigger settings and your velocity settings as serving independent purposes.

                Your trigger input settings like sensitivity, mask time, retrigger cancel etc. are there to configure your module to understand the way you're hitting the drums.

                Velocity is there for the MIDI instrument to control how those hits on your pads translate to drum sounds. That's not necessarily just volume, because soft hits on a drum also have a different character to hard ones.

                You should set up your module's trigger settings appropriately first so you get no double-triggers, appropriate sensitivity range etc. and THEN you should configure your VST's velocity curves so that that signal corresponds realistically to sound.

                Put simply - your module says "this is how the pad was hit," and then the VST says "and this is what sound that makes."
                Last edited by unsaltedmd5; 01-16-20, 01:16 PM.
                Roland TD-50 Digital Pack, Mapex V shells + UFO eBridge triggers.

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                • #9
                  Thanks. I dont think Ive had issues with double triggers at the module end unless I actually mistakenly double tap (easy for me to do on the kick). Sensitivity on module I’ll have to play with to see what seems right, I guess. Like someone else said the TD1 is pretty basic and I think there’s just a single sensitivity setting per pad that affects what volume (velocity?) is generated for a given aggressiveness of stroke. I set each pad to 7 so I’ll play around and see how that feels listening only to the module output.

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                  • #10
                    Get the module right first. It’s no use setting the full trigger level so when you hit really hard you get an output of 127 when you never actually hit this hard. Also no use setting it really sensitive if you get 127 or bear on softer hits. If you set the module right then you don’t need to mess with velocity curves in SD3. I only change the balance between kit parts in SD3
                    Roland TD30 module on TD20 kit SD3 with various kits. Pearl Masters Kit, Yamaha 9000RC original natural wood finish. Cymbals from Zildgian Pasite and Sabian. Loads of percussion bits. Cubase and Wavelab always current versions.

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                    • #11
                      Thanks.

                      It just occurred to me: would you adjust the pad sensitivity on the module while listening through SD or listening to the module’s sounds themselves?

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                      • #12
                        I set mine using the LEDs on my td30 without listening to sounds at all. I then play and check the level while playing by locking to an input. It does take a while to get the levels right on the module. The Roland sounds in module are a bit more compressed than SD3 so are very forgiving if you don’t get the triggering set right. SD3 is very dynamic so it is more important to get it right. In your case I I realise you have a td1 I would try setting with SD3 sounds but it is really try and see.
                        Roland TD30 module on TD20 kit SD3 with various kits. Pearl Masters Kit, Yamaha 9000RC original natural wood finish. Cymbals from Zildgian Pasite and Sabian. Loads of percussion bits. Cubase and Wavelab always current versions.

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                        • #13
                          Thanks. I was messing it with it tonight and what sounds reasonable on the module samples sounds weak on the "clean" SD3 kits...found myself boosting sensitivity on hi hat, ride, crash and kick, but when I went back to listen to module those sounded unreasonably loud.

                          I mean, am I going for an ideal in SD3 where my hardest hit would equal 127, and anything less than my hardest would be something lower? Or, to put it another way, let's say you were recording MIDI, would you want to see 127s all over the place, or only every once in a while? Genre dependent? (i.e. maybe in some kind of blastbeat-based metal you'd have nothing but 127s, but in an alt rock song only a few, or none)?

                          I have next to no experience on an acoustic kit so my frame of reference is not real strong.

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