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Why use a small cone?

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  • Why use a small cone?

    Obviously, I am new and want to build a trigger. I have seen people use a small cone-shaped trigger, and I have also ssen people use a large piece of foam and metal just smaller than the drum head. Whats the advantages and disadvantages between these two examples? If this has already been asked and anwered, please tell me where.
    Thanks!

  • #2
    Welcome to the forum youthdude.

    I have seen people use a small cone-shaped trigger, and I have also ssen people use a large piece of foam and metal just smaller than the drum head.
    You are talking about two very different schools of trigger design, "Cone" vs. "Reflection Plate". The choice will largely depend on the sound module you intend to use. Generally, "cone" trigger designs, whether edge mounted, or center mounted, are used in applications using Roland, 2 Box, and Yamaha modules. "Reflection plate" triggers are typically used in Alesis module applications. If you are an Alesis user, there is a dedicated Alesis forum at www.DMdrummer.com. They also have an in depth DIY section. Stop by the Foyer and introduce yourself and then spend a good deal of time searching around the DIY section. You'll find a lot of information and build threads to guide you through the process. Above all, welcome and have fun.
    Roland TD12 module / DIY Kit in progress, Gretsch Blackhawk A (soon to be E) kit.

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    • youthdude
      youthdude commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks. I have a Roland TD7 module; so, it looks like I'm building it with a cone. I got real lucky and bought a Pearl Traveler set( 3 toms and bass only; no snares, cymbals, or stands ) for less than $50.
      I appreciate the info - very helpful. One more question: Having the TD7, can I get away with making it a mono trigger? or not advisable?
      Thanks again!

    • bwilburn79
      bwilburn79 commented
      Editing a comment
      A single zone trigger pad will work in any of the available inputs. According to the Roland V-Drums wiki, the TD-7 module has 9 stereo (dual zone) inputs, so you can also try building dual zone trigger pads (like a snare with both head and rim).

    • youthdude
      youthdude commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks again for your help.

  • #3
    If your wanting to make mesh head drums with foam triggers I would advise you try and pick up a TD-3 you will find this to be more forgiving than the TD-7 with foam triggers but its not impossible just a lot harder for a first time build...Duncan.
    .

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