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  • Loren
    replied
    I am interested in where people are getting and what they are using for rubber to silent the rims.

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  • Loren
    replied
    Did some modifications:

    Put in some well nuts, put in a grommet. Unfortunately my switchcraft connectors were to short to allow for them to stay so it went. I'm only interested in making this into a single zone so I'm not to much into caring about it. Besides the well nuts negated the need for isolating that hole from the rest of the deal so the electrical tape could come off (and it looks cleaner as well).

    Also swapped out the bolts for longer ones and used rubber washers in between the conduit plate.

    Also drilled bigger holes in the side of the pan so that I could actually have the mounting hardware flush with the shell instead of smashed against the pan. This decoupled the cake pan from the shell, which ended up being a desirable thing.

    The foam I'm using is left over Auralex mopad foam. It's pretty rigid (significantly more than regular auralex stuff) and seems to work well.

    Compared to the factory roland rubber pads, I only had to raise the sensitivity up by 3, there is still more headroom to go higher so I'm ok with having to do that. If the transducers ever check out, I'll be grabbing some larger ones though.

    Now I just need the stupid mesh head (that I don't really want to DIY) to come off back order. I actually like the way mesh heads feel over these real heads as I have noticed I have to keep real heads loser in order for them to trigger right (compared to the rubber and the roland mesh triggers)



    Last edited by Loren; 04-21-12, 09:51 PM.

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  • fulrmr(Daniel)
    replied
    Originally posted by Loren View Post
    I have built my first one. The only thing I really did different was shoot the jack out of the bottom of the cake pan so that if I ever wanted to use this thing acoustically (or sell it) I can return it to factory.

    First one was a learning process. I found out I need taller screws and some rubber washers. Also, I think 27mm isn't large enough. These are quite a bit lower output than the rubber rolands I have so I have to set the sensitivity much higher for this.




    .
    This is where I installed the jacks on my split toms that did not have a bottom head. I saw no need to run the jack through the side with one whole end open.

    in a perfect scenario...a 35mm would probly be best but 27mm will work doing just as you have done with the sensitivity. However with a proper cone you may get a better result also. I use 25mm(1") for my rim piezos.

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  • Loren
    replied
    I have built my first one. The only thing I really did different was shoot the jack out of the bottom of the cake pan so that if I ever wanted to use this thing acoustically (or sell it) I can return it to factory.

    First one was a learning process. I found out I need taller screws and some rubber washers. Also, I think 27mm isn't large enough. These are quite a bit lower output than the rubber rolands I have so I have to set the sensitivity much higher for this.




    I also wouldn't try liquid electrical tape and would opt for a grommit or just regular electrical tape for the hole in the bottom of the pan for the jack, because as you can see I dripped on the shell (thankfully this is a cheap kit).

    Still waiting for the back ordered mesh head for this drum, I think it will perform better as well.
    Last edited by Loren; 04-18-12, 03:01 PM.

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  • fulrmr(Daniel)
    replied
    Originally posted by neaceul View Post
    I was in the hardware store today to work on my "no cone, no hot spot" idea and I saw a 22" aluminum 'cake pan.' (I think it was 22" but may have been 20" can't remember exactly). The "cake pan" was actually a pan you place under a water heater. The price was $21.99. So you might check hardware stores for pans that go under water heaters for very large pans.
    Cheapthrill brought these to my attention some time ago. But the mini crossbar I use at the top of my kick works so well that I've never really done much more than check these out on line. Still have not found a 21" to fit my 22" kick.....but I have seen 19" for those of you with 20" kicks. Fat Daddio's makes pans large enough for 16" and 18" kick builds(at least the last time I looked).

    Hmmm....I may just have to look into these again. Thanks for the reminder.

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  • neaceul
    replied
    I was in the hardware store today to work on my "no cone, no hot spot" idea and I saw a 22" aluminum 'cake pan.' (I think it was 22" but may have been 20" can't remember exactly). The "cake pan" was actually a pan you place under a water heater. The price was $21.99. So you might check hardware stores for pans that go under water heaters for very large pans.

    Leave a comment:


  • Loren
    replied
    Thanks that's what I went ahead and ordered.

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  • fulrmr(Daniel)
    replied
    Originally posted by Loren View Post
    I tried searching for this but was wondering (since it's not 100% clear in any of the photos or videos that I have seen).

    What is the depth of the cake pans you went with?
    Yeah.....it's there(if you follow the links to the specific pans that were used) but sometimes things like that get lost within all the posts and info. I can't tell you how many times I've skimmed through threads and missed things that I know were there...because I was the one that posted them! LOL!

    Anyway.....My pans are the recommended Fat Daddio's with a 2" depth.

    http://cooksdream.com/store/round-pa...t-daddios.html
    Last edited by fulrmr(Daniel); 04-09-12, 04:31 PM.

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  • Loren
    replied
    I tried searching for this but was wondering (since it's not 100% clear in any of the photos or videos that I have seen).

    What is the depth of the cake pans you went with?

    Leave a comment:


  • fulrmr(Daniel)
    replied
    Originally posted by Russ15 View Post
    I figured... As always, thanks for your help Daniel
    No problem.

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  • Russ15
    replied
    Originally posted by fulrmr(Daniel) View Post
    Since the pans usually stick up past the bearing edge and actually become the bearing edge.....measure from the top of the pan. That's what I always do.
    I figured... As always, thanks for your help Daniel

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  • fulrmr(Daniel)
    replied
    Originally posted by Russ15 View Post
    When you are adjusting your cone height to somewhere between 1/16" to 1/8" are you measuring from the bearing edge or the top of the pans to adjust your cone? Thanks
    Since the pans usually stick up past the bearing edge and actually become the bearing edge.....measure from the top of the pan. That's what I always do.

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  • Russ15
    replied
    When you are adjusting your cone height to somewhere between 1/16" to 1/8" are you measuring from the bearing edge or the top of the pans to adjust your cone? Thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • Jack Widow
    replied
    Thank you both for the links and pics

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  • cheapthrill
    replied
    Originally posted by Jack Widow View Post
    Can you elaborate more with the panel jack disconnect thingies got picture or link because I don't have clue what those type of connectors are called nor where to buy them.
    Thanks
    Sure, I can elaborate. I use the NSY-221 deep panel jack, which is essentially a TRS jack with three prongs (there is already a thread about it here).

    The large prong is the sleeve prong, which has some flaps that bend around the lead-in cable to secure it, and then two smaller prongs for the tip and ring, one slightly shorter than the other. I clip the wings off the sleeve prong so that it is flush on both sides, and then use a female spade disconnect. And the two smaller prongs, I use a little smaller female sped disconnect so that nothing touches each other and shorts it. You can buy female spade disconnects of many sizes, I can't remember exactly what I used for my build, sorry. However, I did make a diagram awhile ago to demonstrate how I wired piezos to the jack to the piezos, which I posted below... instead of soldering the leads directly to each prong, solder the leads to a disconnect and then you have a readily disconnectable jack for easy install/removal.

    Leave a comment:

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