Welcome! If this is your first visit, you will need to register to participate.

DO NOT use symbols in usernames. Doing so will result in an inability to sign in & post!

If you cannot sign in or post, please visit our vBulletin Talk section for answers to vBulletin related FAQs.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Cheap DIY Hi Hat Controller-Can it really be this easy??

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Cheap DIY Hi Hat Controller-Can it really be this easy??

    I am not exactly the most knowledgeable when it comes to electronics. At age 40, I have had plenty of experience with needing to accomplish something, but not having the tools or resources to do it properly. So I have learned to improvise. Sometimes I get lucky and figure out a way to do things not because I am incredibly intelligent, but more because I don't know enough about what I am doing to know that I am doing it wrong.

    I just finished converting a kit to use a Roland TD-6, complete with DIY mesh heads, cymbals made from practice cymbals, and more trips to more Radio Shack stores in the Houston area than I care to remember (if your looking for piezo elements in Houston, wait another week or so, I have most of them). Unfortunately, my funds ran out when it came to the hi hat controller. I had a leftover 1/4" 2 pin jack, and thought if I could just connect the two pins with a wire, them plug that in to the module, at least I would have a closed hi hat. No ability to open and close, but at least it would be closed. Did that, and to my surprise, it worked. Had the thought a few days later that if that worked, then all I needed was a switch to connect to those two pins, and someway of opening and closing the switch. Back to Radio Shack's website, and within a few seconds I found what I thought I needed. Here is what I came home with:

    http://www.radioshack.com/product/in...ductId=2062539

    This went into the top of a project box along with the 1/4" 2 pin jack mounted into the side, then tested on the bottom side of the practice set of hi hats (I use the 14" top, the 10" splash from the set serves as the bottom). Much to my surprise, it works!!! Check out the photos, and let me know what you think.
    Attached Files
    Returning after 20 years of not playing, trying to figure out what I missed, and somehow teach my kids in the process.

  • #2
    can you draw it out, or do you have pictures of the inside of the box?
    v-club , cyr14c using as ride, 2 cy6, 5 pd6's
    updated 3 diy toms, tmc6, cy12 ride,diy crash new Tascam midi interface

    Comment


    • #3
      Here is something similar that I did, but with a quick and dirty pedal. This only works with a non-variable hi hat module or I/O. Not much to show, just two wires from the jack to a momentary switch. I later went back and added some foam to give the pedal a little more of a solid feel.
      Attached Files
      Last edited by jman 31; 05-14-09, 06:33 AM.
      sigpic JerEd Systems, LED drum triggers

      Comment


      • #4
        Both of those switches look pretty good. Have you guys considered using the hi-hat stand itself as a switch? Like this:







        In the picture you can see a spring. That spring is one contact of the switch and the other contact is the metal stand itself. Only one wire connection is made inside the black box. That connection is a wire from the spring to the 1/4" output jack. Since I mounted the jack through a metal part of the stand, there was no need to run another wire, because the connection is made with the other contact by mounting the jack to the metal upright. I made this controller in 1998 and it can be seen in my eDrum Set#3 & 4a in the Gallery on my website.
        alesisDRUMMER.com

        Comment


        • #5
          That's pretty nifty Hellfire, You always have such ingenious ideas.
          sigpic JerEd Systems, LED drum triggers

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by doug587 View Post
            can you draw it out, or do you have pictures of the inside of the box?
            Here is a photo inside the box. I have been playing with this for a couple of days now, and it is exceeding my expectations. I am using my regular hi hat stand, and did not have to make any modifications to any hardware to do it. I can easily remove my e-hats, replace them with regular hi hats, and you would never know the difference.

            I am more than grateful for the experience and how to's that members of this forum have posted here. It has allowed me to learn the steps and then have the confidence to actually do them. My A to E conversion is complete, and both myself and my 11 year old (not to mention my wife due to the LACK of noise) are thankful. If anyone decides to do what I did with the hi hat, and needs help, please contact me. I gained so much already from this forum, I don't mind helping someone else in turn.
            Attached Files
            Returning after 20 years of not playing, trying to figure out what I missed, and somehow teach my kids in the process.

            Comment


            • #7
              Looking at your set-up, I wonder if it would be easier to attach the box to the base cymbal rather than the top one. That way, you could get away with a simple plastic disk - even a CD perhaps - to mount it on.
              Also, how much play or travel is there in the switch?
              Finally, is it fully variable, or just open. half open, closed?
              . digitalDrummer
              Review index

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by allanjohn View Post
                Looking at your set-up, I wonder if it would be easier to attach the box to the base cymbal rather than the top one. That way, you could get away with a simple plastic disk - even a CD perhaps - to mount it on.
                Also, how much play or travel is there in the switch?
                Finally, is it fully variable, or just open. half open, closed?
                When using a simple switch you can not get fully variable control. A potentiometer of some kind must be used in order to get full variable and you must be using a module that understands that control change.
                alesisDRUMMER.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hey All! I am living out my life long dream of playing drums! I am 55 and have lived in great ol' NYC for the last 32 yrs. As you might imagine, apts are not large and we all have neighbors, which I, for one, have always been a considerate neighbor : ) So since I have lived here for so long, I never saw it as a possibility for me to bring this dream to fruition. When I was 11, I wanted drums soooo bad, but alas my mother was like the typical one and flat out said no, because, um like, they're loud. I did however, buy a pair of drum sticks and played "air drums" to my favorite songs, pretty much for the rest of my life to this day, minus the sticks. I even play using my thumbs on the subway going to work with my headphones on. So now, flash forward to a few months ago and I see a couple of versions of a mini drum set where they used drum triggers! And I suddenly saw my dream becoming a possibility! Especially living in a small NYC apt.! PLUS this spoke to my deep seeded Techno Geeky self! I have all of my materials and have been combing YouTube for as many tutes as I can find, but the one remaining tute that really shows how to make a diy hi-hat controller, has yet to be found, but also one that I can modify to cymbals that are 3.54 in. In diameter! While I am making my own version of some of the mini drum kits I have found, I am mostly inspired by Ricky Syers who is a phenomenal puppeteer AND drummer who made a mini kit for one of his puppets! AND it's 100% playable! He showed me how I could have a drum set in pretty much a 2-3 ft square area! Awesome! Here is a link to his great ingenuity...Gotta give props to Ricky for sure!

                  https://www.facebook.com/vicfirth.co...3860479971198/

                  https://youtu.be/VBeRwIhAsB8

                  https://youtu.be/sKAoM7fr9nQ

                  So after this lengthy backstory, I am in need of some pics or a video as to how to create the hi-hat controller. I am thinking along the lines of something like the GoEDrum controller, but since the mechanism is hidden inside the black plastic enclosure, I can't see how it works on the hi-hat stand. Most grateful to all of you great DIY'ers here in this forum for any kind of tutes!

                  SpiritualMutt

                  Nyna

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    SpiritualMutt you resurrected an old thread from 2009.
                    Assuming you are talking hhc for a Roland module, here is an idea using the Interlink 406 (ADA-1075) square force-sensitive resistor (FSR) .
                    You may also want to look at this sticky thread .
                    Last edited by pumpal; 03-25-17, 05:03 PM.
                    1982 TAMA Superstar

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thank you Pumpal! I will take a look at the link : ) I hadn't realized the thread was so old! Hee!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I took my hihat floor controller and and a hi hat stand, removed the hihat foot pedal and rigged the hihat stand chain to my Electronic foot controller. It works. At least now it looks and moves like a real hihat

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Rayyyrae View Post
                          I took my hihat floor controller and and a hi hat stand, removed the hihat foot pedal and rigged the hihat stand chain to my Electronic foot controller. It works. At least now it looks and moves like a real hihat
                          You got photos?.

                          I made a strap with a piece of carpet based on a Tama Vintage Pedal. I perforated a hole on each side, one for the electronic pedal screw and the other for the hi-hat stand pull rod.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X