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  • Mesh Head HiHAT?

    I currently own a TD20 with VH12 HiHat.

    Although very nice to play while playing wearing headphones, the acoustic noise created by the VH12 is a pain in the B'

    I am wondering if anyone was ever successful in building a Mesh Head HiHat. Comments will be appreciated.

    IDB

  • #2
    It really shouldn't matter if it's a mesh head or a cymbal. As long as it triggers and you can get used to it feeling a little different it shouldn't matter. In my opinion your pedal is really the most important aspect of the hat.
    sigpic JerEd Systems, LED drum triggers

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    • #3
      [EDIT to correct reversed meaning - dohh]
      I haven't played the VH-12, but the rubber cymbal pads I've used aren't so much louder than mesh heads that it would be worth the effort, IMO. Louder, yes, but not a huge difference.
      Last edited by Poco Askew; 01-02-09, 11:16 AM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Poco Askew View Post
        I haven't played the VH-12, but the rubber cymbal pads I've used aren't so much quieter than mesh heads that it would be worth the effort, IMO.
        That doesn't make sense in the context of this thread. Did you mean that mesh heads aren't much quieter than rubber cymbal pads?

        Bruce

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        • #5
          Originally posted by BarT View Post
          That doesn't make sense in the context of this thread. Did you mean that mesh heads aren't much quieter than rubber cymbal pads?

          Bruce
          I'm guessing that's what was meant... as mesh is universally accepted as being quieter - and therefore more preferable for practice - than rubber.

          The concept of a mesh hi-hat is interesting... but I invisage would be technically difficult to achieve. (partcularly if you want it to work like a 'VH' hi-hat as opposed to a 'CY' one) and would also feel quite odd to play. The point I think Poco Askew was making (please correct me if I'm wrong)... I too, wonder whether the high compromise in 'feel' and 'usability' in exchange for an acoustically slightly quieter hi-hat for practice would be worth pursuing...?

          Still an intriguing idea though...
          Last edited by MisterMR; 01-02-09, 10:35 AM.


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          • #6
            Originally posted by BarT View Post
            That doesn't make sense in the context of this thread. Did you mean that mesh heads aren't much quieter than rubber cymbal pads?

            Bruce
            Ooops! Yes. Sorry. I'll edit after I have my coffee.

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            • #7
              I guess it would be difficult to make a mesh head which would fit on a regular hihat stand. But it could be interesting to try using a PD as a hihat. I think I'll give it a try later.

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              • #8
                I used to use a mesh remo pad conversion as a hihat was kinda quieter except for when i caught the rim, but as for a mesh shape hihat i dunno. Maybe cut the hihat shape out of foam and cover in a mesh with trigger in the middle somehow, then that would sit on the controller like the vh11? Or am I reading the question completely wrong?

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                • #9
                  Roland mesh pads have been tried and used as hi-hats by some in the past:

                  Any one use a PD-80 or other mesh head for their Hi Hat?

                  using PD-80R as hi-hat

                  The lack of edge triggering from a mesh rim on a hi-hat input is a consideration.

                  Bruce

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                  • #10
                    I'd say the biggest problem would be the rim on a PD pad. In fact, I think that anything made with mesh would need a stiff rim which would kinda defeat the point as you'd still be hitting something harder than the mesh at one point or another.

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                    • #11
                      I forgot to mention that in fact I am already using a PD85 as a HH during late night playing and VH12 when time permits. I was thinking of experimanting by cutting a large opening cut through an old Paiste qcoustic HH I don't like and cover the whole thing with some mesh material. Of course it will be a challenge to trigger this arrangment. Further ideas in to complement this idea are welcomed and appreciated.

                      Thanks
                      IDB

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                      • #12
                        why not put some soft neoprene rubber on the vh-12 and soft foam between the the two plates ( this does reduce some of the clunking).

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by spanner View Post
                          why not put some soft neoprene rubber on the vh-12 and soft foam between the the two plates ( this does reduce some of the clunking).
                          Sure - I am ready to do it. Do you have experience with this method? For sure it will reduce the acoustic sound once applied on top of the VH-12. I tried several things between the plates and it not so easy to reduce the acoustic noice while maintaing the electrical triggering as good as before. I will be more than happy to hear from someone who managed to resolve this successfully. BTW, do you happen to know where can I buy some neoprene Rubber?

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                          • #14
                            I used a light foam from a fabric shop. Something like acoustic foam tiles.
                            I then cut strips to fit into the underside of the top cymbal (there is a slight cavity) and stuck it firmly with double sided tape. This reduced some of the clunking noise.
                            I then ran thin strips of 2mm foam (like the stuff you buy for sealing drafts from windows) aroung the circumferance of the bottom plate. This reduced the noise from the impact of the plates when they close.

                            Neoprene rubber is fairly easy to come by. Mouse mats are typically made from it.
                            When I had my first td3 in my house, I covered all of the pads with neoprene to reduce noise. I had to raise the trigger sensitivity and the feel was not so good but it stopped my girlfriend complaining:

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by spanner View Post
                              I used a light foam from a fabric shop. Something like acoustic foam tiles.
                              I then cut strips to fit into the underside of the top cymbal (there is a slight cavity) and stuck it firmly with double sided tape. This reduced some of the clunking noise.
                              I then ran thin strips of 2mm foam (like the stuff you buy for sealing drafts from windows) aroung the circumferance of the bottom plate. This reduced the noise from the impact of the plates when they close.

                              Neoprene rubber is fairly easy to come by. Mouse mats are typically made from it.
                              When I had my first td3 in my house, I covered all of the pads with neoprene to reduce noise. I had to raise the trigger sensitivity and the feel was not so good but it stopped my girlfriend complaining:

                              First results with Neoprene are very impressive. I attached a large round circle made of Neoprene to the bottom section of the upper HiHat. Bingo - no more clapping sound. I also attached a small piece of Neoprene to the upper side. Again, far less noise, but the sound is still somewhat bonky. I think I should really find a solution to this by filling up the space between the 2 plates. I have no clue what to fill it with though...

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