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Isolation Ideas for DIY Multipad Controller?

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  • Isolation Ideas for DIY Multipad Controller?

    Have any of you guys ever taken apart a multipad by one of the companies to see how they isolate their piezos?

    In making a DIY multipad controller, what kind of isolation methods have you/can be used to eliminate sympathetic vibrations?

    Know of any web sites showing how it has been successfully done?

  • #2
    good question. Today i thought the same thing. I have no idea. They must have pretty good isolation, since hitting one pad never triggers the other, while they're in the same housing. (For instance, the pads on the m-audio axiom 61). Anyone any info?

    peaceandlove

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    • #3
      I tried opening an akai mpd16 and found out that they are using FSRs instead of piezos. I think by using FSRs that helps a lot with the isolation.

      Haven't tried opening those with big pads and can be hit with sticks though.

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      • #4
        The SPD-S uses piezos for the six larger pads and ribbon switches for the three edge pads. Not much isolation of the piezos, but the SPD-S doesn't have any user settings for Threshold or Crosstalk Cancel on internal pads; and it seems both are set quite high by the factory. Therefore, you can't hit an SPD-S pad very lightly and expect it to trigger. There's a link to photos of the insides here: SPDS - How Do It Work??

        Bruce

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        • #5
          I am also looking at building a multipad to go with my a-kit, (something like an SPDS).......A few thoughts....
          Reverse the strategy used in mesh triggers, ie, more, and softer foam behind the piezo rather than in front, and a more direct mounting method between the piezo and the rubber, (possibly foam tape).
          Isolate each trigger as a separate piece of rubber, and also back the rubber with foam between it and the case.

          Myke C.



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          • #6
            That sounds like what I was thinking. What would you mount the piezo too?

            I was thinking cans filled with expandable foam, and wrapping the cans with something to deaden them like drum wrap or veneer. Use mouse pads for striking surface (I've done that before with good success) and glue mouse pad to the bottom of the can and another layer of mouse pad on a solid surface which the cans gets glued to.

            I thought of running the piezo wires through vinyl tubing and taping them down so no vibration sets them off. The actually box would be filled with rug foam or egg shell foam to deaden it. I'll place it on a snare stand with some pipe foam on the arms for killing vibrations there.

            Just thought of rubber repair couplings for cylinders. Completely vibration free. Can affix a striking surface with something like Plumber's goop. Fill with the foam, etc.
            Last edited by RayF; 11-24-08, 08:31 PM.

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            • #7
              As far as cross talk, I seem to remember that SPD Roland units used some type of crosstalk isolation circuitry.

              Anybody build a successful DIY Multipad (i.e., good dynamic range and no crosstalk between pads)?

              PIEZO RUBBER:
              Dauz used to make nice small round rubber pads mounted on uni-balls that clamped onto a rack pole. Great isolation, but I hated the rock hard rubber feel of the pads.
              Zen drums use small round pads meant for fingers and hands, and are supposed to have superb isolation. Anyone know their "secret" method, and can it be used for larger pads meant for sticks?
              I also remember the old Hart six pack that had 6 rectangular rubber pads.

              FSR:
              Alternate Mode FTB FSR Trigger Box ($249) with some FSRs, could be a great DIY multipad, if you can find good sized FSRs that don't cost too much.










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              • #8
                I would try using a layer of a membrane switch with a piezo on top (under the rubber surface), and both in series. This way the whole section only sends out a trigger when it's directly hit and by sympathetic resonance (provided it's slighly decoupled), yet still provides dynamics information from the piezo. Similar to obtaining bell & edge velocity on cymbal pads, although the 'serialisation' is done in software.
                gear: MarkDrum YES e-kit highly modified (low-volume trigger cymbals, 16" DIY kick, 12" DIY snare + tom 3, Goedrum HH controller), Triggera 10" splash
                band: http://theboardmusic.com

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by sascha View Post
                  I would try using a layer of a membrane switch with a piezo on top (under the rubber surface), and both in series. This way the whole section only sends out a trigger when it's directly hit and by sympathetic resonance (provided it's slighly decoupled), yet still provides dynamics information from the piezo. Similar to obtaining bell & edge velocity on cymbal pads, although the 'serialisation' is done in software.
                  Thanks for your input. You just reminded me of a picture (posted a while back) of the inside of a SPD-S. I think it had membrane switches under each pad.
                  The only problem with membrane switches, is, if you can find one in a decent size and price. But a good possible solution.

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