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My First E-Drum Project

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  • My First E-Drum Project

    Hello All,

    I have finally decided to convert my DW Collector's Seris drums to electronic.

    I have started a blog series that will progress as my project does, and I will be posting final pics here when I'm done.

    If anyone wants to see my progress, stop by CoreDrumming.com and go to the blog section. There will be detailed pictures, price lists, part supplier lists and video where appropriate. You will even be able to leave comments as I post so I can clarify my process.

    Edit: CoreDrumming has been taken offline indefinitely. All relavent pictures are in this thread.

    Drum On,
    Dave
    Last edited by hammersmith; 07-29-09, 05:14 PM.

  • #2
    I have gotten my first round of parts in the mail and decided to put a little bit together.

    I got 2 rack toms mounted so far, but my cones haven't arrived yet. In an effort to avoid all forms of damage to my shells, I did things a little different than most.

    Fisrst, I used truss clips from Home Depot as my L brackets.


    I was concerned about the brackets gouging the shells, so I cut a sheet of 1/8" rubber from Home Depot (plumbing department) into little squares. I mounted the rubber squares between the brackets and the drums as a cushion.


    I was also concerned about isolating the shells from the braces, so I used neoprene (rubber) washers sandwiched between regular steel washers on the crossbrace.

    I got a set of 1 3/4" cross braces from Speedy Metals. I ordered them pre-cut to size for $28.82 including shipping. I love the look of the real wide u-channel. It will also allow me to stick the piezo right to the cross brace without attaching a separate plate.




    Here is a pic of them installed - sans cone. I took the time to paint them because they were so scratched. I don't care if they look great, but I want a finished look.
    Last edited by hammersmith; 11-11-08, 05:32 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      It always make me cringe when I see guys converting a beautiful drumset like this. Fair enough an old tama kit or something but not a DW collectors. I'm not trying spark any debate or offend anyone by saying this its just my opinion. Anyway their your drums and you can do what you want with them and by the looks of it your doing a very nice job of the conversion...
      My Kit
      http://www.vdrums.com/forum/attachme...2&d=1257067362

      Comment


      • #4
        He's done nothing that can't be completely undone by removing the 4 lug screws for the crossbars, remove the crossbars, replace the 4 lug screws, and VIOLA! Back to plain 'ole acoustics and you'd never know they were once converted.

        Comment


        • #5
          Yeah. I've taken great pains to make sure there is NO damage to the shells, such as rubber pads between the brackets and shells. I am buying all the extra parts such as longer screws, washers, etc to make sure no hardware gets damaged.

          This project will probably take a while because I'm working on doing things differently than I've seen before. Right now I'm working on a hi hat controller and am having trouble with it.

          When I'm about to give up I'll post and see if anyone has a brilliant idea I could use.

          Comment


          • #6
            Here's how I did my hat controller.
            http://vdrums.com/forum/showthread.php?t=34597

            Comment


            • #7
              The only semi-destructive thing I did to any of my acoustic conversions was pulling the sound hole grommet and on my Pearl's I had to drill out the sound holes ever so slightly to accommodate the TRS jacks. But I'm thinking that could easily be repaired with some new grommets sized to the slightly larger sound holes. And nobody would ever be able to visually tell the difference. You could negate that by mounting the TRS jack to your crossbar, not installing a bottom head, and running the cable that way, or maybe constructing your own cables and running the cable through the sound hole (assuming the cable is small enough) and again putting the jack on the crossbar assembly. Where there's a will there's a way.

              Comment


              • #8
                Hammersmith,

                I first cringed when I read about your idea of a DW Collectors series A2E conversion, but it looks like you have thought it out well enough to avoid irreparable damage.

                I was wondering, what is your plan for routing a cable to the trigger?
                Last edited by cheapthrill; 11-13-08, 11:12 AM.
                sigpic

                Comment


                • #9
                  Wow! Looks like quite the job! You are one dedicated edrummer.
                  Kit: Roland TD-6V (soon to be TD-12 or TD-20module:cool:); Rock n' Soc throne; DW 5000 D.B. Kicker.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I was going to remove the sound hole grommet and install a Neutrik TRS jack, but the jacks are too big for the hole, and drilling the shells is not something I'm willing to do.

                    I make my own cables anyway, so I think I'll go with Gastric's idea of routing through the sound hole. It's not as stealth looking as I would like, but it will keep my drums intact.

                    Here's the low down on my hi hat controller design. It's still in heavy development now, so it doesn't look great.

                    I'm using a rotary pot instead of a linear style



                    Here's the other side



                    Here's how it mounts to the stand.





                    It's tough getting the assembly to rotate correctly, and I think I broke the potentiometer (oops ). I'll keep working on it. If anyone has a creative idea I would love to see it.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      It's certainly an interesting design, though seemingly tailored to your specific stand. I've always been interested in finding a DIY pedal that provides the least amount of actual pedal travel to provide a full closed-to-open transition. My slider, at least used with my Trigger IO, still requires the hats to physically open much more than they normally would.

                      Just for contrast here's three different ways to implement a slider on your acoustic stands:

                      Beatnik box
                      Hidden-inside-the-hats
                      Visible slider on the pedal

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Gastric View Post
                        The only semi-destructive thing I did to any of my acoustic conversions was pulling the sound hole grommet and on my Pearl's I had to drill out the sound holes ever so slightly to accommodate the TRS jacks. But I'm thinking that could easily be repaired with some new grommets sized to the slightly larger sound holes. And nobody would ever be able to visually tell the difference. You could negate that by mounting the TRS jack to your crossbar, not installing a bottom head, and running the cable that way, or maybe constructing your own cables and running the cable through the sound hole (assuming the cable is small enough) and again putting the jack on the crossbar assembly. Where there's a will there's a way.
                        I don't think that the plug of a cable is small enough to fit through a sound hole without removing the grommet first. Even if it can, there is a catch to it...to make the kit look it's stealthiest, leaving the bottom heads on would be ideal, so if the TRS jack is attached to the crossbar, you'd have to remove the bottom head to plug it in. Perhaps this can be solved by running ample cable through the soundhole with the trs jack placed somewhere else, like velcroed to the mounting hardware or something.. heck, even paint 'em chrome or something. I agree, Gastric, if there's a will, there's a way.
                        sigpic

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          That's a great idea. I can run cables through the sound holes and put an external connector on the hardware. My lug casings and tom mounts are black anyway so it will be easy to make them blend in.

                          Thanks for the idea.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            My thought was you simply pull the cable through the sound hole WITHOUT the cable ends on. Then solder the cable to the ends once it's through the sound hole. As long as you're not using particularly thick cable I'd think the raw cable would fit through the sound hole fine. And in fact would probably look "stealthier" since you only have a thin cable hanging out of the shell instead of a comparably ginormous jack plugged into the side.

                            It certainly has it's disadvantages:

                            * You have to now construct your own cables instead of just buying factory made ones and plugging them in
                            * If you have a cable problem you can't quickly swap them out

                            But the advantages could be:

                            * Don't even use a cable end on the drum trigger side. Just take the bare wire, secure it to the crossbar, and solder the piezo wires directly to the cable. No cable end, no TRS jack needed at all. Certainly having an end and jack stuck inaccessible inside the drum has no advantage anyway.

                            Just my thoughts.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I'm feeling you.

                              I'll probably end up going that route, but I'll mount a female jack in a stealth location on my mounting hardware. If a cable goes bad I don't want to have to take the drum apart and re-solder the whole thing to fix a cable.

                              I'll get a little prototype going and post a pic of it when my cones and piezos arrive in the mail.

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