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S&S Industry trigger improvements

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  • S&S Industry trigger improvements

    I'm assuming this falls into the DYI forum. I purchased a seemingly ancient and heavily used set of S&S Industry dual-trigger head/rim drums, three Pintech Visulite cymbals, a Gibraltar rack, and an Alesis D4 on a tripod stand. I've had them for a few weeks now and have been steadily tweaking the settings in the Alesis to maximize the effectiveness of the various triggers. However, I still have the following unresolved issues I hope to correct with some good 'ole DYI modifications.
    • Triggers are mostly effective in the very center of the head.
    • Triggers are very sensitive to crosstalk (hit a cymbal, triggers a drum, hit a drum, triggers a different drum) I've actually corrected the crosstalk by jacking the Alesis crosstalk values up to 99, and for some triggers had to jack the noise values up as well.
    • Rim triggers are either hard to trigger (6" drum I use for a hihat you have to hit the actual rim trigger tower itself, not the rim) or trigger accidentally when hitting the head (hit the head, and it often triggers the rim trigger at the same time)
    • Pintech "ride" appears to be a dual trigger, since it has two outputs, yet only one works.


    Note there's only two cymbals pictured as I'm short a cymbal boom. I have two functional single trigger 12" black ones and the one 14" dual-trigger ride.

    My primary focus is improving the use of the rim triggers on the drums. Currently the only drums I can use in an effective dual-trigger mode is the 8" snare which works great and exactly as it's supposed to. And the 6" I'm using for the hihat. I get no crosstalk on that one, however, as noted above, I have to hit the actual rim trigger housing to trigger it. Hitting the actual rim often fails to trigger it and will trigger the head trigger instead since I have to whack the crap out of it. This could possibly be a result of the crosstalk/noise settings on the Alesis. Though I haven't recently, usually if I drop the noise/crosstalk values then the rim trigger will be totally unusable due to random mis-triggers. Which is exactly the problem I have on the three "tom" triggers I have setup. They simply trigger the rim trigger too frequently when hitting the head.

    So, I've started to venture past the limited settings on the Alesis D4 and considering modifying the drums themselves. As a start I'm creating this thread and have provided a variety of pictures.

    The drums themselves seem well made. Though maybe not totally well thought out from a trigger implementation as you'll see. I'll try to describe it as best I can and let my words and the pictures paint the picture for your analysis and feedback.

    RIM TRIGGER
    -------------
    The rim trigger appears to be a 23mm piezo glued/epoxied directly to a metal "tower". The tower is then glued to a thin rubber base which is then likely glued to the metal drum itself. There's no screws or rivets visible from the understide of the drum base, though there's two small holes at the bottom of the tower which I'm assuming is how they're glued to the thin rubber base. Since it appears to be all glue/epoxy I haven't been bold enough to take one apart. They're pretty rigid, though they flex ever so slightly to let you get the drum head/hoop off. I'm not exactly sure why the head hits trigger the rim piezo so easily. But I'm assuming it's simply a vibration isolation issue. Or the fact that the piezo is more or less pointing directly at the rim/hoop which will likely vibrate whenever the head it hit.

    HEAD TRIGGER
    ---------------
    This is pretty interesting, actually. There's what appears to be a 27mm pieze glues/epoxied to a steel plate with a small hole drilled in the middle facing the drum head. This is sandwiched between two different layers of foam. All happily glued together, of course. Some glue salesman made a bundle from this company! Seems like a reasonable design. Though I'm assuming it's the itty bitty hole in the center of the steel plate that limits the triggering to the very center of the drum skin.

    And now for the pictures. Please review and hammer me with ideas. I'm happy to experiment on one of the drums. There's not to much too them. Just 2 piezos, some foam, and one steel plate with a hole in the middle. I don't really see how I could screw them up beyond repair.


    TOM #2 PICTURE (TRYING TO USE RIM TRIGGER FOR RIDE BELL)


    TOM #2 HEAD/HOOP REMOVED


    TOM #2 FIRST LAYER OF FOAM PEELED BACK

    TOM #2 STEEL PLATE UNDER FIRST LAYER, NOTE THE PIEZO HOLE


    TOM #2 FULL FOAM, PLATE, PIEZO SANDWICH


    TOM #2 WIRING


    TOM #2 RIM TRIGGER 'TOWER'


    TOM #2 RIM TRIGGER CLOSEUP OF RUBBER BASE

  • #2
    Some kit pictures for your viewing pleasure. Only thing of particular interest to note regarding the kit is the handy dandy wiring channel I bought from Staples for my computer cables but used for the drum kit instead. Kit was SUPER messy with cables galore before the wiring channel was used. Unfortunately I don't have a "before" photo, but I'm sure you all know what it looks like.

    KIT PICTURE 1


    KIT PICTURE 2


    KIT PICTURE 3


    KIT PICTURE 4

    Comment


    • #3
      Just to reempt a few potential questions after viewing the photos.

      * 12 space SKB rack
      * Alesis D4 in top slot
      * Behringer V-Amp Pro Bass next
      * Samson S-Phone 4 channel headphone amp next (no amp, no monitors currently, everything via headphones to keep my house quiet and family and neighbors happy)
      * Aardvark Q10 rack last which is connected to my bare bones WinXP SP1 P4 1GB DAW.
      * Schecter C-1 Elite hanging on the wall
      * Emily the Strange poster next to it
      * The drum throne is set to a height usable for my three small kids. I actually use the cheap Ikea computer stool next to the kit. It's comfy, adjustable, and had a little spongy up-down action.

      Generally I run my guitar directly into the Aardvark which has 2 guitar preamps built in. Then use Amplitube for my guitar amp which I find is really great. I also have a Johnson J-Station and the Behringer for guitar sounds but don't use them at all anymore as I find Amplitube superior and much easier to tweak thanks to it's awesome GUI. The drums I go between the Alesis sounds which are shockingly good for general rock sounds considering it was made in 19-freaking-92 or whatever. But mostly I use Addictive Drums which is generally great, though has a somewhat steep learning curve for really tweaking out the sounds. Mostly I find it annoying how difficult it is to get good mixed in levels on the ride and crash to the overall kit. But I haven't consulted documentation yet.

      I can run everything through the Aardvark/DAW with about 14ms of total latency all in real-time. Sometimes I hook up my cheap and ancient Sure Prologue mic, as well, as the kids love to sing. Even with some effects on the mic latency is still great without pops/clicks.

      Mostly I'm a hack guitar player and don't record. I only bought the drums as they were super cheap and I always wanted a set to screw around on. And thus begins my screwing around.

      Comment


      • #4
        First off, from your pictures I would say you have a pretty solid edrum set. I would like to take a stab at the rim sensor towers. Each of the trigger are dual sensor? Is that correct? and are both piezo sensors wire to the same 1/4" jack, or two different jacks? I ask because an Alesis D4 does not have dual trigger inputs. If your trigger sensors are wire to one jack, then you would need a left & right splitter cable. It looks like that is what you have on your snare trigger. Judging from the pictures you have it looks like the rim towers are meant to rest (or push) against the rim when the rim is on the drum. Do they push against the rim? If not (meaning the rim sits too low past the tower) chances are the drum heads are worn out. Meaning they have been tightened over the years so much that they stretched, making the rim sit to low, or those are not the original rims. Some older drum sets would have thicker gauge rims. If those are replacement rims, it was most likely easier to buy the more easily available rims which tend to be the thinner gauge rims. I think Pearl still sells two different gauge rims. They heavier gauge is called super rims? I may be wrong about that. It has been so long since I had to buy a specific rim gauge. Keep in mind I am not familiar with this brand of edrums you have, I am just taking a stab at some of your issues. I really do think you have a good solid edrum set. I have never seen any edrum set quite like this, so like you I most likely would have bought it too! Good Luck with it.
        alesisDRUMMER.com

        Comment


        • #5
          Excellent assumptions and questions!

          * Each trigger has it's own 1/4" jack. So that's 2 outputs per drum. 5 dual-trigger/ouput drums, kick, 3 (currently) single-trigger cymbals, and I've exceeded the D4 inputs.
          * The trim trigger tower apparently IS supposed to make physical contact with the head rim. Or so I think now that you made me look at that aspect. The 6" drum which I'm using as a hihat has the rim connecting towards the top of the tower. The snare, which works the best of the bunch, a little lower, and the toms have the bottom edge of the rims touching the bottom of the towers.
          * Like I said, this kit is HEAVILY used. It's not run over by a truck, but the rack is tarnished, there's a couple rust spots, some of the screw-down lugs on the drum heads are missing their nylon washers, and the heads themselves are beat and should probably be replaced. They're not smooth across the entire surface. Though I was hoping that was because I'm a drum noob and didn't know how to tigten them properly. Which could be the case, and could be why the toms are apparently over tightened.
          * It looks like everything is original, including most of the wires which show signs of hack-job repairs along the way. And the kick doesn't have it's original rubber trigger cover. Instead it has some sort of industrial rubber boot glued over the trigger. That's functional though for me right now as I'm not aware of kick nuances at this point. I just want to be able to play my snare and toms with variable loudness which I'm currently lacking.

          As far as the overall quality of the drums I couldn't be more pleased. Definitely better than the entry level single-trigger rubber kits I'd think. And this was half the price of a used Roland TD3 kit. And they're definitely unique in overall construction. Looks to be a powder coated steel base/receiver. Then the heads/hoops bolt on. The guts you've seen. Pretty sturdy overall and would seem to be long lasting. Like I said, not much to them overall and I'm happy to experiment. I see no reason why I couldn't rig up something similar to the a-to-e conversions. Though I don't have a deep shell with pre-drilled holes for a cross bar. I'd have to invent something on my own in that regard. And I'd prefer to use cheap real heads VS expensive mesh for the time being. At least assuming that real heads are significantly cheaper. I haven't considered replacing them as I didn't think they needed it until now.

          The cymbals are your standard Visulites so nothing exciting to report there. And the Gibraltar rack seems pretty full featured and stable, just not sexy and curved like today's issues. But I have clamps galore, I'm just short a couple cymbal booms. It came with some extra "stuff" that I've clamped onto the rack to hold my sticks and headphones and to loop my guitar cable on to keep things tidy.

          Seriously this is my favorite toy I've bought to date. Downloaded some play-alongs without drums and thanks to those keeping a fairly steady rhythm I'm now Jimmie Hendrix's Bizzarro Drummer. Haha!
          Last edited by Gastric; 05-25-08, 11:03 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Gastric View Post
            Excellent assumptions and questions!

            * Each trigger has it's own 1/4" jack. So that's 2 outputs per drum. 5 dual-trigger/ouput drums, kick, 3 (currently) single-trigger cymbals, and I've exceeded the D4 inputs.
            * The trim trigger tower apparently IS supposed to make physical contact with the head rim. Or so I think now that you made me look at that aspect. The 6" drum which I'm using as a hihat has the rim connecting towards the top of the tower. The snare, which works the best of the bunch, a little lower, and the toms have the bottom edge of the rims touching the bottom of the towers.
            * Like I said, this kit is HEAVILY used. It's not run over by a truck, but the rack is tarnished, there's a couple rust spots, some of the screw-down lugs on the drum heads are missing their nylon washers, and the heads themselves are beat and should probably be replaced. They're not smooth across the entire surface. Though I was hoping that was because I'm a drum noob and didn't know how to tigten them properly. Which could be the case, and could be why the toms are apparently over tightened.
            * It looks like everything is original, including most of the wires which show signs of hack-job repairs along the way. And the kick doesn't have it's original rubber trigger cover. Instead it has some sort of industrial rubber boot glued over the trigger. That's functional though for me right now as I'm not aware of kick nuances at this point. I just want to be able to play my snare and toms with variable loudness which I'm currently lacking.

            As far as the overall quality of the drums I couldn't be more pleased. Definitely better than the entry level single-trigger rubber kits I'd think. And this was half the price of a used Roland TD3 kit. And they're definitely unique in overall construction. Looks to be a powder coated steel base/receiver. Then the heads/hoops bolt on. The guts you've seen. Pretty sturdy overall and would seem to be long lasting. Like I said, not much to them overall and I'm happy to experiment. I see no reason why I couldn't rig up something similar to the a-to-e conversions. Though I don't have a deep shell with pre-drilled holes for a cross bar. I'd have to invent something on my own in that regard. And I'd prefer to use cheap real heads VS expensive mesh for the time being. At least assuming that real heads are significantly cheaper. I haven't considered replacing them as I didn't think they needed it until now.

            The cymbals are your standard Visulites so nothing exciting to report there. And the Gibraltar rack seems pretty full featured and stable, just not sexy and curved like today's issues. But I have clamps galore, I'm just short a couple cymbal booms. It came with some extra "stuff" that I've clamped onto the rack to hold my sticks and headphones and to loop my guitar cable on to keep things tidy.

            Seriously this is my favorite toy I've bought to date. Downloaded some play-alongs without drums and thanks to those keeping a fairly steady rhythm I'm now Jimmie Hendrix's Bizzarro Drummer. Haha!
            I wouldn't worry to much about the cross bar type set-up. Believe it or not, a center mounted "cone" (as most around here call it) is not a necessity since you want to stay with standard drum heads. However, with that said, mesh heads will work just as well as standard heads on your edrum set. If you want to try out mesh heads, but don't won't to spend a lot of money, look at the Pearl muff heads. They are pretty cheap. Between $6-15 if I recall. They won't last as long as the high end mesh heads, but you can get a feel for the mesh heads.

            The type of sensing system you have on your edrum kit is the tried and true method called a reflection plate. If you feel you need more sensitivity, I would try a couple of things. First you could try a larger piezo on that plate or you could install a thinner gauge plate. Try something like aluminum flashing.

            If you stay will the heavy gauge plate that you have, you might want to try suspending the reflection plate with a foam ring. This can cut down on some of the hot spotting. It sometime can help with cross talk. It would look something like this:
            .
            Just some more of my ideas.
            alesisDRUMMER.com

            Comment


            • #7
              Hey Gastric, do you have any pictures of the bottom of these triggers? I just want to see how the jacks are mounted.
              alesisDRUMMER.com

              Comment


              • #8
                Picture of the jacks. And low and behold! Some rivets for holding the rim trigger towers to the base which I never noticed before.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Some additional feedback:

                  * This has all been very helpful into getting me to watch different things. Unsure why I didn't notice this specifically before but I can clearly watch the Alesis and it'll indicate if I'm getting crosstalk or mis-triggers since it indicates which trigger is being activated. I noticed I'm getting snare head hits when hitting the rim quite often. So though I'm getting no inter-drum crosstalk I still have a lot of issues separating the head/rim triggers on these things.
                  * Visually reinspecting the rim trigger towers seems to offer no particular indication as to how the rim touches the tower and the performance of the tower. At least as best I can tell. Both the snare and hihat both have the hoop touching the top of the tower. Yet the snare triggers off the trim shot (and often a head shot too), but I have to actually hit the tower itself on the hihat to get a trigger. The toms seem to tighten the hoop down to touch the bottom/base of the rim tower. They trigger well on the rim as they should, the problem there is crosstalk from head hits which trigger the rim all the time.
                  * One the left tom, which I've deemed my experiment drum, I cut a core from the base foam leaving a 1" thick ring. However, that actually increased crosstalk significantly. Which makes sense as the piezo itself is now exposed to vibrations from the steel base/shell of the drum. Even with the Alesis crosstalk AND noise both at the max of 99 the left tom would constantly trigger the right tom (the one with the core cut out of the base foam). Reinsert the foam and the crosstalk is instantly rectified and I can totally disable the Alesis noise setting. So my conclusion tonight is that the base foam is responsible for inter-drum crosstalk isolation, which makes sense.
                  * I've found that the Alesis gain setting is extremely sensitive. When I got the drums they were all at the max of 99. Following the manual instructions of setting the gain based on a hard hit I had the gain on most of the triggers down into the 70's and 80's. However, I was missing some of the low velocity hits, notably on the snare. Incrementing gain by 1 at a time I found that a gain of 93 would still lose the subtle snare hits, but a gain of 94 would introduce them, but a gain of 99 would mask them too much. Keep in mind I'm not a drummer, nor do I have any experience with this stuff.

                  Just for your review here's a typical trigger setting on the Alesis:

                  * Vcurve 1 (I find that a higher Vcurve works like a compressor and increases the velocity/volume of subtle hits too much giving it that machine gun sound)
                  * Xtalk 99
                  * Noise usually off, but set to 50 or more on some of rim triggers in an effort to isolate them from mistrigger/crosstalk. For example, the hihat rim is set to noise of 50. After typing this I'll readjust these settings to see if I can introduce some actual rim hits to trigger it without also introducing head crosstalk.
                  * Gain 94-96 on the S&S drums, 96 on the Pintec ride, 51 on the Pintec I fixed with a RadioShack piezo/project box.

                  As far as I can tell I have the S&S heads setup as good as can be. I get no crosstalk between individual drums, I'm getting a seemingly acceptable volume spread between subtle and hard hits, I'm getting accurate reproduction of fast rolls (at least to my non-drummer ears) without any noticeable extra triggers in there. The cymbals work reasonably well, though the one that still uses the original Pintech piezo lacks subtlety and really can seemingly only produce a single velocity sound, and I'd like to have a bell sound on my ride sometime soon. I'll do some research here on the best way to accomplish that using the Pintech's and Alesis together (I'm guessing it won't be easy to separate out the bell/bow thanks to the Alesis). But if I can get a dual-triggered ride working and my 3rd cymbal as a crash going I'm not sure I'd really need to use any rim triggers on the toms. I have the hihat rim setup for a cowbell, though I rarely use it and it's easy enough to whack the actual trigger tower since that particular trigger is not physically near anything else to get in the way.

                  I'm happy to provide some audio samples for review which is easily done since everything is running through Reaper. Providing you with video synced to that audio would be another story as I've not done that before.
                  Last edited by Gastric; 05-28-08, 02:39 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Gastric View Post
                    Some additional feedback:

                    * This has all been very helpful into getting me to watch different things. Unsure why I didn't notice this specifically before but I can clearly watch the Alesis and it'll indicate if I'm getting crosstalk or mis-triggers since it indicates which trigger is being activated. I noticed I'm getting snare head hits when hitting the rim quite often. So though I'm getting no inter-drum crosstalk I still have a lot of issues separating the head/rim triggers on these things.
                    * Visually reinspecting the rim trigger towers seems to offer no particular indication as to how the rim touches the tower and the performance of the tower. At least as best I can tell. Both the snare and hihat both have the hoop touching the top of the tower. Yet the snare triggers off the trim shot (and often a head shot too), but I have to actually hit the tower itself on the hihat to get a trigger. The toms seem to tighten the hoop down to touch the bottom/base of the rim tower. They trigger well on the rim as they should, the problem there is crosstalk from head hits which trigger the rim all the time.
                    * One the left tom, which I've deemed my experiment drum, I cut a core from the base foam leaving a 1" thick ring. However, that actually increased crosstalk significantly. Which makes sense as the piezo itself is now exposed to vibrations from the steel base/shell of the drum. Even with the Alesis crosstalk AND noise both at the max of 99 the left tom would constantly trigger the right tom (the one with the core cut out of the base foam). Reinsert the foam and the crosstalk is instantly rectified and I can totally disable the Alesis noise setting. So my conclusion tonight is that the base foam is responsible for inter-drum crosstalk isolation, which makes sense.
                    * I've found that the Alesis gain setting is extremely sensitive. When I got the drums they were all at the max of 99. Following the manual instructions of setting the gain based on a hard hit I had the gain on most of the triggers down into the 70's and 80's. However, I was missing some of the low velocity hits, notably on the snare. Incrementing gain by 1 at a time I found that a gain of 93 would still lose the subtle snare hits, but a gain of 94 would introduce them, but a gain of 99 would mask them too much. Keep in mind I'm not a drummer, nor do I have any experience with this stuff.

                    Just for your review here's a typical trigger setting on the Alesis:

                    * Vcurve 1 (I find that a higher Vcurve works like a compressor and increases the velocity/volume of subtle hits too much giving it that machine gun sound)
                    * Xtalk 99
                    * Noise usually off, but set to 50 or more on some of rim triggers in an effort to isolate them from mistrigger/crosstalk. For example, the hihat rim is set to noise of 50. After typing this I'll readjust these settings to see if I can introduce some actual rim hits to trigger it without also introducing head crosstalk.
                    * Gain 94-96 on the S&S drums, 96 on the Pintec ride, 51 on the Pintec I fixed with a RadioShack piezo/project box.

                    As far as I can tell I have the S&S heads setup as good as can be. I get no crosstalk between individual drums, I'm getting a seemingly acceptable volume spread between subtle and hard hits, I'm getting accurate reproduction of fast rolls (at least to my non-drummer ears) without any noticeable extra triggers in there. The cymbals work reasonably well, though the one that still uses the original Pintech piezo lacks subtlety and really can seemingly only produce a single velocity sound, and I'd like to have a bell sound on my ride sometime soon. I'll do some research here on the best way to accomplish that using the Pintech's and Alesis together (I'm guessing it won't be easy to separate out the bell/bow thanks to the Alesis). But if I can get a dual-triggered ride working and my 3rd cymbal as a crash going I'm not sure I'd really need to use any rim triggers on the toms. I have the hihat rim setup for a cowbell, though I rarely use it and it's easy enough to whack the actual trigger tower since that particular trigger is not physically near anything else to get in the way.

                    I'm happy to provide some audio samples for review which is easily done since everything is running through Reaper. Providing you with video synced to that audio would be another story as I've not done that before.
                    You are definitely a good writer. Thanks for the detailed information. Thanks for the picture of the jack side as well. I thought I saw pop rivets in one of your other pictures, but I wanted to make sure. I did a little research on S&S Industries. It looks like the eDrum Kit you have was made somewhere in the mid to late 90's. The reason I was trying to date the kit is because it looks like there is a rubber spacer between the rim tower and the base of the drum. Rubber will shrink and get harder over time. There is a good chance this rubber spacer has done just that. Just an idea.

                    Another idea (if you want to try it) I have is, since the metal edrum seem to induce a lot of vibration, is add a heavier layer of rubber into the foam rubber sandwich you already have. Neoprene rubber (mouse pad rubber) might help. The four layers would go like this (bottom to top): mouse pad rubber, the base foam, sensor plate, and then top sensor plate foam. Now the mouse pad rubber shouldn't be more than a 1/4" thick. You may have to remove a thin layer of base foam, so only do this if you do not mind experimenting on your purchase. I know these are things I have done in the past and sometimes they work and sometimes they don't. Good luck and thanks for sharing the information with the community.
                    alesisDRUMMER.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Looks like you've found more info on the S&S triggers than I did during my searches.

                      I have the head triggers working to my current satisfaction. And I'm going to take a short break from trying to crack the case on the rim triggers for now as and just enjoy the kit for a bit. And work on modifying the Pintech cymbals instead so I can get a bell ride sound out of the kit and add that 3rd cymbal into the mix, maybe for a hihat instead of the puny 6" drum.

                      Then maybe squeeze in some time to actually play ON them instead of WITH them.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Purchased a $5 Pearl 8" mesh head to test with. It's significantly more silent and seems to trigger comparably to the real heads. Disadvantage is the head is much less tight/stiff, though that's expected. But it seems to take a bit more effort to get fast and tight rolls out of it as the stick feels like it sinks into the mesh VS an instant and tactile bounce. I had no complaints bout the noise level of the real heads on these so the only selling point would be that they're only $5 a head.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I did a real cheap modification to the stupid, stupid hihat pedal by sandwiching the stock 2-way pedal into a real hihat using some odd clamping knurled bar that came with the S&S kit. I previously had the bar clamped onto a cymbal boom and hung my guitar cable on it so it wasn't a mess on the floor. Feel free to educate me what it's really for.

                          I was briefly thinking of some more elaborate modification. I'm assuming I could right up a project box and lever microswitch and mount it all on the bottom of the hihat pedal. You probably wouldn't see it, and it'd still feed the D4 it's basic on/off via the microswitch but provide a much better pedal feel as it's a little clunk and clicky with the stock switch jammed in there. But functional.







                          Current setup of the kit. Now that I have a real hihat stand and extra cymbal booms I now have all three Pintech Visulites in action. Hooked up a bell zone on the ride, just a piezo stuck on the bell with the wires all dangly for now. A crash in the middle. Using the 6" as another crash. One 8" as the snare, two 8"s for toms, and the 10" for floor tom. Have Pearl Mesh on most of the drums now with the last 8" in all of North America being delivered early next week. Just kidding... sort of. Really, nobody has them in stock.

                          Last edited by Gastric; 06-13-08, 10:19 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Hi Gastric. Welcome to the world of S&S. I have the same pads at home and I'm in the process of figuring out the correct settings for these pads on the TD-10. If anyone has suggestions I would really appreciate the help.

                            These pads are built extremely well and will withstand years of countless beatings. In terms of the trigger construction, they are very similar to the old ddrum pads.

                            As for that knurled bar you referred to, it is actually a cowbell mount to be used on a real bass drum hoop.


                            taz
                            Attached Files

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              For a first kit I really don't have too many complaints, other than the annoying hihat on/off switch. That was a real disappointment. But the drums themselves seem well made, though they do have a pretty narrow dynamic range and I do have genuine issues with the rim triggering. But a lot of that could be related to the ancient DM4 module's abilities.

                              I've purchased some acoustic drums and am venturing into a full DYI as you can see here: http://www.vdrums.com/forum/showthread.php?t=41153 I've ordered a Trigger I/O module to test the acoustics with and can also test the S&S with it as well just for my own education to see if a module swap produces overall kit performance/dynamics improvements.

                              Regardless, a super great introduction to drums for a first time drum owner! Replacing the mylar with the Pearl mesh was a step up as well in regards to my enjoyment of the kit and silencing it further.

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