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Drum isolation riser

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  • #16
    Originally posted by DjangoJanner View Post
    I had similar problems isolating noise from playing upstairs in office with noise coming through to living room below.

    Isolating platforms seem to be combination of a heavy mass platform sandwiched with something to absorb the vibration. I glued and screwed 3 layers of 18mm ply together and put that on top of platfoams . ( Acoustic 2x4 slabs) . Then made another platform out of another 2 layers of 18mm ply and isolated that from the other platform with sylomar blocks ( absolutely fantastic isolating of vibration providing the load is correct) . Its not that easy to get hold of the lighter grade stuff that you need for a drum platform , ended up purchasing it from Rathenberger ( r drums ) in Germany.

    Its working well and has pretty much eliminated the vibration side. I also found the old fashioned heavyweight tredair red or green carpet underlay does a pretty good job of deadening sound . That with a heavy carpet on top reduces a lot of airborne noise and is still pretty cheap compared with specialist acoustic solutions. Also put in a thick fire rated door on the bedroom to replace the hollow existing one which was letting a lot of noise through.

    The first thing you notice when planning anything to reduce noise is that specific noise reducing products are very pricey and anything that will do the job but not carry that acoustic tag is going to save a lot of money.

    P.S. Only reason i used wpb 18mm ply for my platform is that i had it to hand , otherwise other products like mdf with the same mass would have saved money.
    That's great thank you. . how well has it worked? I've seen sylomar blocks but Im not sure about how to weigh my drums properly, and if I should include my leg weight as I'm not planning to put my stool on the riser. are the sylomar blocks the main solution? .
    Electronic: Roland TD12 KV, Mapex Mars Hi-hat, Pearl 100-TWC Pedal
    Acoustic: Yamaha Stage custome advantage, Ziljian ZBT hi-hat, crash, ride, Paiste splash, Pearl 100-TWC pedal

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    • #17
      Originally posted by ronaldobf View Post

      Yep, If using it, you will have to weight everything in order to find the minimum and maximum area necessary for the specific foam. This is because it works best within a specific range, meaning that if it is too light or too heavy, the performance gets impacted. You will also want to distribute the foam blocks according to the weight on specific areas.
      There is a video from vdrums tip.

      I might be wrong here, but on the calculation suggested there, it shows the minimum necessary to work on its best performance. Then, it shows the weight range so you know the room you still have to grow your kit without impacting the foam performance. Showing the minimum means that the weight needs to be equal or greater than that minimum. I would say that it is safer to reduce just a bit the foam area so you can surely stay within the expected range, even though when you're stepping on it, it will generate more "weight" anyways.

      In terms of checking the weight,I used a luggage weight scale and hung the pieces one by one. The rack, I did it with that scale too. I had to fold it a bit and find a point of balance to be able to weight. You can eventually use a regular bathroom scale too. Just put something, like a plywood, calibrate the scale to 0, then rest the rack on the top of it (or, with no calibration, weight the wood separately then subtract from the total.
      The only piece I didn't weight was the platform itself, which is too heavy. I just took a small piece of the same wood and weighted it. Knowing its area and weight and knowing the area of my riser I could make the calculations and get its actual weight (or you can put on the top of a regular scale, the ones used in bathrooms). I ended up not buying the foam for now, but since I was working with my drums, moving stuff, I took the chance to weight it all in case I move to the foam solution.
      That's awesome thank you, that would make weighing easier. I wonder if you should weigh legs too if you're not adding the throne to the riser. what are you using instead of the foam?
      Electronic: Roland TD12 KV, Mapex Mars Hi-hat, Pearl 100-TWC Pedal
      Acoustic: Yamaha Stage custome advantage, Ziljian ZBT hi-hat, crash, ride, Paiste splash, Pearl 100-TWC pedal

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      • #18
        I am currently using the tennis balls cut in half as shown in the link I shared.
        If you go on the tennis balls way, make sure you have good ones (the hard ones), as there are some "flat" or "too soft" ones out there.

        Regarding the legs, my drums throne is also not on the top of the riser. I would say that it would be good to be within the range (close to the minimum) so when you put some leg force you will have some room (some kilograms) that can be used before reaching its max.
        Also, when it reaches the max, it does not mean that it will not be effective. It will, but not on its optimal way.

        Ronaldo B.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Jeffo View Post
          I built one with a big full sized ludwig acoustic to electronic conversion and the drummer throne and me 240lbs on the platform. So mine was this build. 2 6 by 6 pieces of 3/4 inch 3 Mdf (medium density fiberboard) green glued together no nails . I put them on top of pieces of Aurelex Platfoam that run front to back and I placed them about 12 inches apart. I think Aurelex helped me figure out the spacing based on the total weight on the platform including the kit throne and me on the plarform . If you are building an ekit with smaller pads and you , yourself will not be on the platform, you can adjust accordingly
          Awesome, I may contact Aurelex and see what they suggest for just the e-kit, all the options seem to come down to how much the kit weighs. how has your setup worked for you so far? I've been debating giving in and getting the Roland noise eaters but I feel I'd need to build a decoupled/isolation platform anyway.
          Electronic: Roland TD12 KV, Mapex Mars Hi-hat, Pearl 100-TWC Pedal
          Acoustic: Yamaha Stage custome advantage, Ziljian ZBT hi-hat, crash, ride, Paiste splash, Pearl 100-TWC pedal

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          • #20
            I took that kit apart and returned it to acoustic. I also moved and had no room for it in my new smaller space so I had to get rud of it . Shame . now I have a much smaller kit with noise eater pads under the pedals and under the legs of the kick , snare, and floor tom

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Jeffo View Post
              I took that kit apart and returned it to acoustic. I also moved and had no room for it in my new smaller space so I had to get rud of it . Shame . now I have a much smaller kit with noise eater pads under the pedals and under the legs of the kick , snare, and floor tom
              Whatever works for the space, as long as you can enjoy it. . Been looking at noise eaters, tempting but it's like 400 when you have a double bass pedal.
              Electronic: Roland TD12 KV, Mapex Mars Hi-hat, Pearl 100-TWC Pedal
              Acoustic: Yamaha Stage custome advantage, Ziljian ZBT hi-hat, crash, ride, Paiste splash, Pearl 100-TWC pedal

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              • #22
                Not cheap but I like the portability of them as opposed to the more permanent type of situation with a drum riser . If I had the room, It would be a drum riser

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                • #23
                  I used to have a riser that covered the whole kit area, but I didn't like the fact it was super heavy and hard to keep clean underneath it, so I decided to try a DIY NoiseEater.

                  Got two pieces of MDF, one in a rectangular shape (for the bass drum and pedal) and one in a rhombus shape for the hi-hat stand. Bought 2 set of these Sylomer pads and added one set in each NoiseEater. It's portable and cheaper than the original one. I believe the total for both was less than 50 EUR. And I find the final solution more visual appealing than my previous tennis ball riser.

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                  • #24
                    Psynchro, do you have a pic of the finished product top and bottom that I could see

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Jeffo View Post
                      Psynchro, do you have a pic of the finished product top and bottom that I could see
                      Sure. Here are they.
                      IMG_0697.jpg
                      IMG_0698.jpg
                      Attached Files

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by psynchro View Post

                        Sure. Here are they.
                        IMG_0697.jpg
                        IMG_0698.jpg
                        That's awesome, how does it work in comparison to the drum riser? I think sylomer pads work on weight? did you include the weight of your leg or just the drum and pedal?
                        Electronic: Roland TD12 KV, Mapex Mars Hi-hat, Pearl 100-TWC Pedal
                        Acoustic: Yamaha Stage custome advantage, Ziljian ZBT hi-hat, crash, ride, Paiste splash, Pearl 100-TWC pedal

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Glowage View Post

                          That's awesome, how does it work in comparison to the drum riser? I think sylomer pads work on weight? did you include the weight of your leg or just the drum and pedal?
                          I haven’t heard any complaints from my neighbours, and I’ve been practicing 2h every evening, so I believe it’s as good as the drum riser. I didn’t ask them though, so it’s just an assumption. It’s much easier to keep the area clean though.

                          I did test it with my leg/foot.

                          For the bass drum the mini platform + pedal + pad weights 8kg. With my leg on it while hitting the pad it peaks at around 20kg.
                          For the hi hat I did similar measures. The platform + stand + pad weights around 9kg. With my foot and leg on it I measured 15kg with the hat open and 26kg with the hat closed.

                          The manufacturer recommends four blue pads for 7 to 15 kg.
                          Probably Sylomer doesn’t follow a linear progression, but I didn’t put much time trying to figure this out, so I decided to apply 8 in each mini platform to cover something from 14kg to 30kg. I will email the manufacturer and let them know about the new usage I found for the product and ask them recommendations. I will post here as soon as they have replied.

                          But regardless, I’ve been using it for the past week or so, and as I mentioned, I’ve been practicing 2h every evening. And I’ve been doing a lot of bass drum exercises, so I believe it’s working fine.
                          Last edited by psynchro; 02-28-21, 07:34 AM.

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                          • #28
                            Good to hear its working so far. Some guys say to talk to your neighbors and tell them that you play , but you dont want to disturb them, even show them what things you are doing to keep the noise down. Maybe that's smart, byt I am mire old school. Like, " No news is good news", Lol! If they arent happy with the modifications, you will know soon enough!

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