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  • I needed more cowbell...

    I was thinking of adding a cowbell to my kit, and decided to give it a try recently, and i'm pretty happy with the result. Very simple straight forward diy.


    Parts:
    * a Cowbell (duh!)
    * a piece of 3x5 adhesive neoprene
    * a 35mm piezo
    * Mono endpin jack
    * small rubber drum rim protector (i happened to have an old one)
    * dual side adhesive to stick the piezo to the cowbell


    You can look these things up for yourself on Amazon or Ebay

    Picture walk through:

    First drill a hole for the endpin jack

    20200820_183822.jpg


    Cut off a piece of the rim protector, trim to size and super glue. This is the key element of the design, you need to go all the way around with the rim protector and this will nearly deaden the resonance from the cowbell... which i assume you want (like me). Then you don't have to fiddle with stuffing foam inside.
    20200820_183734.jpg

    Put a line of clear silicone around the inside of the rim protector and put it onto the cowbell, then let it sit for 24 hours.
    20200820_183705.jpg


    Insert the endpin jack and screw it in... beware it was tricky business trying to figure out how to screw the endpin jack in tightly. it was a mix of a flathead screwdriver and a needle nose plyers. good luck lol
    20200820_190943.jpg

    couple the 35mm piezo to the endpin jack and stick it to the bottom of the inner cowbell. and stick the adhesive neoprene to the top.
    20200820_192012.jpg

  • #2
    And the result...

    20200821_055708.jpg
    Attached Files

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    • #3
      Good stuff.
      I did it too, but with a thin layer of rubber on the top of it, it was not as quiet as I wished so I used a mute rubber. I have to say that the rubber mute was really effective. It got quiet enough, but it won't trigger easily too even increasing the sensitivity.
      I stuffed foam inside and put back a thin layer of rubber on the top of it, and it didn't help in terms of acoustic noise. So I am still fighting between the playability vs noise level.


      Ronaldo B.

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      • #4
        Always needs more cowbells! I used a 27mm piezo because the 35mm was too hot in my previous set up.
        DTX700, A2E Dixon kit, Yamaha cymbals, FSR HH
        Kit Pix http://vdrums.com/forum/album.php?albumid=613

        My new venture, HiEnd Speakers. : voglosounds.com

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by ronaldobf View Post
          Good stuff.
          I did it too, but with a thin layer of rubber on the top of it, it was not as quiet as I wished so I used a mute rubber. I have to say that the rubber mute was really effective. It got quiet enough, but it won't trigger easily too even increasing the sensitivity.
          I stuffed foam inside and put back a thin layer of rubber on the top of it, and it didn't help in terms of acoustic noise. So I am still fighting between the playability vs noise level.

          Yeah now that I'm getting a chance to break it in it's still a bit louder than I wanted. Might have another go at muting it.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by perceval View Post
            Always needs more cowbells! I used a 27mm piezo because the 35mm was too hot in my previous set up.
            Haha
            cowbell.gif

            I was a little worried that the 35mm would be too hot, and considered putting a 10k pot on there. But decided to stay the course and it seems just right. The piezo's can vary so much in their production quality i'm sure there's a bit of luck in getting one that's too hot or not. Good call though.

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            • #7
              Rookie question. I’ve seen multiple posts mentioning piezos running hot. When you guys say that do you actually mean the temperature of them or is that slang for something else? Can you feel them get too hot or is there a specific way they react with the module that makes you think this? Thanks!

              Comment


              • #8
                We say that when they reach high velocities (as though it were a hard hit) when not hitting that hard, drastically reducing the dynamic range. Nothing to do with temperature

                Comment


                • #9
                  Yeah, "too hot" basically means it's hitting the red, or is clipping, too soon. You don't want that on your MIDI, or your audio signal. What you want is headroom. Maximum dynamics, from low to high, but with lots of headroom.
                  Module: TD-9v2. Kick: KD-8, pedal: Iron Cobra with KAT Silent Strike beater. Hats: VH-10 with Tama Swivel hi-hat stand. Snare: PD-120. Toms: 3 x PD-80R. Crashes: CY-12RC, CY-14. Ride: CY-15R. Aux: BT-1.

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                  • #10
                    yep building on what ignotus and monospace said, I believe it's related to the amount of voltage produce by a given piezo, depending on the quality of materials and the consistency of the build process, 2 piezos from the same production run will produce different voltages when the same amount of pressure is applied. So if you buy a pack of piezos, expect that you may encounter a few that are difficult to work with, because of they generate "too much" voltage for the module. Imo the best option is to replace it with another piezo since they are cheap and it adds more overhead to compensate. on that matter, you can "cool" a hot piezo buy inserting a resistor, but like i said, more overhead.

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                    • #11
                      So, all in all, the piezo is too hot, means that the piezo is too sensitive. It's most likely caused by the piezo itself, how you mount it, or how it reacts on the surface you're hitting. To deal with it upfront I use a potmeter connected as a voltage divider in line with all my piezo's. I dial them in so that a hard hit peaks out on the input. That way I get maximum dynamic range.
                      Brain: mega drum. 5 toms: DIY mesh head, side-mounted DIY triggers. Snare: 14" 682 head, DIY crossbar trigger. 2xDIY beaterless BD pedal. .Cymbals: Crash: 2x 16" brass: 2 zone. Ride: 20" brass: 2 zone. Hi-Hat: 14" 1 zone DIY Control pedal + Pearl H900 stand. + drum rack:

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                      • #12
                        This is my take on the cowbell:
                        cowbell.jpg
                        I cut up the cymbals of one of these playstation drum sets. It had 2 cymbals, so I have 2 cowbells now. They come with piezo's inside. So cutt out the right part, and you're done..
                        Brain: mega drum. 5 toms: DIY mesh head, side-mounted DIY triggers. Snare: 14" 682 head, DIY crossbar trigger. 2xDIY beaterless BD pedal. .Cymbals: Crash: 2x 16" brass: 2 zone. Ride: 20" brass: 2 zone. Hi-Hat: 14" 1 zone DIY Control pedal + Pearl H900 stand. + drum rack:

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Viperr View Post
                          This is my take on the cowbell:
                          cowbell.jpg
                          I cut up the cymbals of one of these playstation drum sets. It had 2 cymbals, so I have 2 cowbells now. They come with piezo's inside. So cutt out the right part, and you're done..
                          That’s a pretty neat result, nice one
                          A2E fusion kit with Jobeky dual triggers, A2E low volume cymbals with TD17 module.

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