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Would casting a foam cone work?

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  • Would casting a foam cone work?

    Seems like many of us are trying to cut a cone from foam... but another thought just occured to me. What about using a liquid urethane foam to poor into a cast so that it forms as a cone, and then there's not need to figure out how to cut the perfect cone. You could probably find a sutable funnel that's the right size and DIY it to serve as the cast for the poured cone.

    This sounds like it has the same features as poron... ie it's used for orthopedic applications and has good rebound.

    https://www.smooth-on.com/products/flexfoam-it-6/

    Anyone try this approach yet?

  • #2

    Only one way to know if it'll work!! Overall though, I'm not sure if it will save you a great deal of money. By the time you do all of that, it probably would have been cheaper to just buy a cone and ship it. It's only really helpful if you are making a lot of cones and planning on selling them. Would love to see the result if you go through with it and would probably buy a few if you get a very good result.

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    • #3
      I did just that a few months ago. Short answer: you can.
      Shorter answer: Don't.

      I 3D printed a cone mold and used the smooth ON expandable foams.

      Scroll down a few posts to see the result: https://www.vdrums.com/forum/advance...-for-cone-foam
      Last edited by frankzappa; 08-10-20, 10:35 AM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by mrantarctica View Post
        Only one way to know if it'll work!! Overall though, I'm not sure if it will save you a great deal of money. By the time you do all of that, it probably would have been cheaper to just buy a cone and ship it. It's only really helpful if you are making a lot of cones and planning on selling them. Would love to see the result if you go through with it and would probably buy a few if you get a very good result.
        haha, yeah i think at this point i've past the point of saving money and now it's just more of a personal challenge, although the liquid stuff doesn't seem that expensive. Probably the most costly part would be time. still assessing this option, will definitely post if i give it a try.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by frankzappa View Post
          I did just that a few months ago. Short answer: you can.
          Shorter answer: Don't.

          I 3D printed a cone mold and used the smooth ON expandable foams.

          Scroll down a few posts to see the result: https://www.vdrums.com/forum/advance...-for-cone-foam
          nice, i figured you might have already gone down this road i noticed in that thread that you use an oscilloscope to view the wave form and compare with Roland. Is this hard to do? It made me realize i'm basically just guessing based on feel whether something is better or worse, and that'll only get me so far.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by causticv View Post

            nice, i figured you might have already gone down this road i noticed in that thread that you use an oscilloscope to view the wave form and compare with Roland. Is this hard to do? It made me realize i'm basically just guessing based on feel whether something is better or worse, and that'll only get me so far.
            I didn't even have to look in the oscilloscope to realise that the expandable foams won't cut it.

            You have to remember that this foam is made to be compressed for years and still be able to bounce back to it's original shape. The company making it have spent enourmous amount of resources and it's a foam made for industry applications, foot wear etc. It's made to survive. You can make any foam work for a while but it won't survive for prolonged periods of abuse without losing it's properties. Or even being compressed under a mesh head without even hitting it.

            Also, Roland has researched this for many, many years now and in stead of trying to reinvent the wheel it's much better to learn from them. With their knowledge in the bag you can try to do further research but without wasting time on trying stuff out that is already well documented.

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            • #7
              true good points, I was more thinking of being able to test materials in general. It does seem that the liquid stuff is too hard to be useable.

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