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Idea for a DIY hi hat - will a triggered l80 cymbal feel better than a cy-5 cymbal?

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  • #31
    I'm using a Pi3, so there's plenty of power, and I'm using my own dsp code. The current CPU consumption is around 5-30%, depending on how many voices (up to 32), and whether I've got EQ, compression or reverb going. My feeling is there'd be enough headroom for trigger processing, especially when considered that incoming signal buffers can run at fs/2 or fs/4 (11 or 22k). Latency atm is stable at 16 samples using the audioinjector octo shield.
    gear: MarkDrum YES e-kit highly modified (low-volume trigger cymbals, 16" DIY kick, 12" DIY snare + tom 3, Goedrum HH controller), Triggera 10" splash
    band: http://theboardmusic.com

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    • #32
      Originally posted by sascha View Post
      I'm using a Pi3, so there's plenty of power, and I'm using my own dsp code. The current CPU consumption is around 5-30%, depending on how many voices (up to 32), and whether I've got EQ, compression or reverb going. My feeling is there'd be enough headroom for trigger processing, especially when considered that incoming signal buffers can run at fs/2 or fs/4 (11 or 22k). Latency atm is stable at 16 samples using the audioinjector octo shield.
      You should make a thread. I'd be interested to know more about it

      Maybe a demonstration video as well

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      • #33
        We talked:
        https://www.vdrums.com/forum/advance...24#post1219224
        Last edited by sascha; 05-20-20, 08:38 PM.
        gear: MarkDrum YES e-kit highly modified (low-volume trigger cymbals, 16" DIY kick, 12" DIY snare + tom 3, Goedrum HH controller), Triggera 10" splash
        band: http://theboardmusic.com

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        • #34
          Ah, that was you. Cool, I hope you make a thread anyway and give us some updates

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          • #35
            It's too irregular, an on-off project. Sometimes I leave it aside for a month and then do stuff every night. Making an extra thread at this point would just mean too much pressure on myself, but I need to sync it up with job, family life and the band.
            gear: MarkDrum YES e-kit highly modified (low-volume trigger cymbals, 16" DIY kick, 12" DIY snare + tom 3, Goedrum HH controller), Triggera 10" splash
            band: http://theboardmusic.com

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            • #36
              Originally posted by sascha View Post
              It's too irregular, an on-off project. Sometimes I leave it aside for a month and then do stuff every night. Making an extra thread at this point would just mean too much pressure on myself, but I need to sync it up with job, family life and the band.
              Ah I understand.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by frankzappa View Post

                Mate, this is an electronic cymbal. It has to vibrate less or it won't trigger properly. You want it to be a distinct tap. You can't have it actually sound like a low volume cymbal, that will not work at all.

                Putting the rubber around it will make it sound like tap, tap in stead of chrasssssh which is what you want.

                The rubber rim is the best method for preserving feel. At least for the bow. The edge will obviously feel like hitting a rubber rim. You can do it with a clear vinyl on the bottom it will dampen it to a tap sound. You will get rid of the rubber rim but it will be much louder and it will feel like hitting a table.

                IMO the rubber rim is the best option both for feel, lowest volume and triggering.

                You will never get a true cymbal feel because a cymbal will vibrate for a very long time and will bounce the stick around for several seconds from the vibrations after you hit it. This will not happen on an electronic cymbal. Other than that and the different feel of the rubber rim this is as close you can get IMO.

                Here you can see a video of this style cymbals with the room sound and the trigger sound.

                Ah i see what youre saying, thanks for clarifying.

                If id just have to mute a low volume cymbal anyway, would it be a better idea to buy an actual cymbal and trigger it as opposed to an l80? I ask because ive found an actual cymbal is cheaper so if i have to mute and dampen the cymbal's vibrations anyways, i dont see why id buy the low volume cymbals. Any ideas?
                Thanks

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by COVID-20 View Post

                  Ah i see what youre saying, thanks for clarifying.

                  If id just have to mute a low volume cymbal anyway, would it be a better idea to buy an actual cymbal and trigger it as opposed to an l80? I ask because ive found an actual cymbal is cheaper so if i have to mute and dampen the cymbal's vibrations anyways, i dont see why id buy the low volume cymbals. Any ideas?
                  Thanks
                  A low volume cymbal can be muted with a rubber rim which makes it silent and preserves feel. A regular cymbal has to be muted with vinyl on the bottom or top. This will make it feel like hitting a table. It doesn't feel nice trust me. Low volume cymbal with rubber rim is the best option for feel IMO.

                  There is one more possible solution (although more expensive). You can mute it with another low volume cymbal underneath (or a round plate of some kind) and put some poly-fil (very light foam like material) between and maybe some rubber between the cymbals at certain spots close to the edges.

                  I've been experimenting with this today and it really dampens it nicely without destroying the feel. Usually if you dampen a low volume cymbal with a vinyl you would actually increase the volume. This method with the poly fil makes the cymbal feel and sound the same only makes the sound very short. I used a hihat fastener thingy wih two cymbals and a sheet of poly fil batting to test.

                  This will remove the need for the rubber rim but the cymbal will be heavy and slightly thicker however if you use a smaller cymbal underneath it won't be noticeably thicker. Low volume cymbals are usually lighter anyway so will not make a huge difference.
                  Last edited by frankzappa; 05-22-20, 01:11 PM.

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                  • #39
                    very happy with the feel of my L80 hi hat with rubber rim. game changer for e-kits.
                    Alesis STRIKE, PD-85 rack toms, PD-105BK floor tom, Mapex snare with ISM-6, PDP MX 22" kick with ISM, iron cobra 900 double pedal, hart e-cymbal2, CY-5 as splash, CY-8, CY-12R, L80 hi-hat with cheap-o trigger with goedrum hi hat controller. EZdrummer2+EZX/Addictive Drums 2 VSTs.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by frankzappa View Post

                      A low volume cymbal can be muted with a rubber rim which makes it silent and preserves feel. A regular cymbal has to be muted with vinyl on the bottom or top. This will make it feel like hitting a table. It doesn't feel nice trust me. Low volume cymbal with rubber rim is the best option for feel IMO.

                      There is one more possible solution (although more expensive). You can mute it with another low volume cymbal underneath (or a round plate of some kind) and put some poly-fil (very light foam like material) between and maybe some rubber between the cymbals at certain spots close to the edges.

                      I've been experimenting with this today and it really dampens it nicely without destroying the feel. Usually if you dampen a low volume cymbal with a vinyl you would actually increase the volume. This method with the poly fil makes the cymbal feel and sound the same only makes the sound very short. I used a hihat fastener thingy wih two cymbals and a sheet of poly fil batting to test.

                      This will remove the need for the rubber rim but the cymbal will be heavy and slightly thicker however if you use a smaller cymbal underneath it won't be noticeably thicker. Low volume cymbals are usually lighter anyway so will not make a huge difference.
                      Interesting. Can you post a picture?

                      I use rubber rim guard on my converted zildjians with no problem. I use rubber tips on my sticks though.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Aka Wayne View Post

                        Interesting. Can you post a picture?

                        I use rubber rim guard on my converted zildjians with no problem. I use rubber tips on my sticks though.
                        I made a video demonstrating it. https://www.vdrums.com/forum/advance...bber-rim-video

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