Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

why cones?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • why cones?

    I am curious why do the most pads have nowadays a CONE above the piezo?
    My old Hart Snare has a "tower" instead of a cone and i find this concept is more forgiving in regards of hotspot problematic.

    btw i am wondering why there is not much love for the old concept where a complete disk of foam is underneath the head (and under the foam a metall plate with the piezo in the center). quasi a "tower" concept to the max.
    I own the old (beautifull wooden) yamaha pads from the dtxtreme 1 series and changed the skins to Roland meshheads which results in my favourite pads of all time. Less trampoline, and a sweetspot not a hotspot (how i hate center triggers).
    I experimented a bit and took the foam out, and made a little cylinder out of really dense foam and put it in the center. It was just the same as a i.e. Roland pd128, same feeling, response and hotspotting.



    Last edited by docdoghouse; 01-06-20, 07:02 AM.

  • #2
    Originally posted by docdoghouse View Post
    I am curious why do the most pads have nowadays a CONE above the piezo?
    <cynic>
    So the top of the cone wears out nice and quickly, so you have to buy new ones at <your currency>20 a time
    </cynic>

    *** Never buy a module without MIDI IN ***
    Yamaha & Roland modules. DTX,TM-2, EC-10, EC10m, SP-404. Multi12. TrapKat. ControlPads. Octapad, SamplePad, Wavedrum. Handsonic. Dynacord RhythmStick. MPC. Paiste 2002/Signatures. Cajons. Djembes. Darbuka. Windsynth. MIDI Bass. Tenori-on. Zoom ARQ. Synths. Ukes.

    Comment


    • #3
      My guess is the spot is smaller. I have a diamond snare which is not a cone and more of a tower. The hot spot does seem less. I’ve built a few myself using cone and tower with all sorts of foam and most have been ok. My old ddrum4 pads had the disk with the piezo in the middle then foam on top. I too put mesh on to make them quieter. Still in use with my son. I did find a mesh head on the bass drum destroyed the foam behind it eventually though. It is very old though.
      Roland TD30 module on TD20 kit SD3 with various kits. Pearl Masters Kit, Yamaha 9000RC original natural wood finish. Cymbals from Zildgian Pasite and Sabian. Loads of percussion bits. Cubase and Wavelab always current versions.

      Comment


      • #4
        With a shock pulse on top of the cone tip the acting force is conically distributed and passed down through the foam to the outer edge of the piezo.
        Roland TD-17 KVX - iMac 27" i9 16GB - Universal Audio Arrow audio interface via Thunderbolt 3 - Superior Drummer 3 - Komplete Ultimate 12 - Logic Pro X.

        Comment


        • #5
          Wouldn't an upside down cone make more sense?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by mbetter View Post
            Wouldn't an upside down cone make more sense?
            It would create more of a hotspot, because then you'd be focusing the impact into a smaller area, rather than dispersing it.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by joeymaas View Post

              It would create more of a hotspot, because then you'd be focusing the impact into a smaller area, rather than dispersing it.
              I was thinking about a cone where one side was the size of the entire head and the other side was close to the size of the piezo. Though I imagine you're right, you'd have a larger (but probably less dramatic) hot spot. Just spitballing here, what if you had an upside-down cone like described above but made of foam that gets progressively more rigid as you move from the center to the edge?

              Comment

              Working...
              X