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Customized 3-spring Tama Dyna-Sync Pedals

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  • Customized 3-spring Tama Dyna-Sync Pedals

    Thought I’d share a little project I’ve been working on.

    In my quest to have a perfectly balanced double pedal, I decided to customize my new Dyna-Sync double pedals by adding a 3rd spring assembly to the slave unit.

    With Tama and most other vendors they place tension springs on the primary drive pedal only, which results in a laggy feeling in the slave drive pedal. You can try to compensate by adjusting spring tension, beater angle, cam angle, etc - but it’s never 100%. The best test to see how close or far off your pedals are is to simply pull both beaters back a few inches and release... The slave pedal beater will swing out of sync and will die out before the primary beater in just about every case.

    To address this, high end pedals like Trick, Axis, ACD, Czarcie Kopyto, etc all employ springs on the slave pedal which provide better feel and pedal dynamics. I initially went this route by buying a longer beater axle for the slave pedal and then moved the slave spring from the primary to the slave support assembly...

    2 issues:

    The first was a pretty big problem. The connecting driveshaft on the Tama pedals has a fair amount of play in the joints which is exacerbated when the spring tension is feeding the drive shaft from the slave side. This caused A LOT of chatter and effectively made the pedal unplayable... The fix - I needed a higher quality drive shaft... which was quickly applied in the form that f a Trick P1V6P drive shaft.

    Second issue was that even after the new drive shaft - while the pedal was better in feel and responsiveness, it was still dying out and falling out of sync with the primary beater...

    So I looked at a pair of signature Axis pedals and took note of their 3-spring design. I researched this for a bit and noted that most reviews from people that had the 3-spring setup used the primary-side spring as a supplemental tension point to fine tune the slave pedal’s feel and rebound. So back to the parts bin and about 30 minutes later I had it all together.

    After quite a bit of experimentation with various tension settings, I’m happy to report that it’s a success. Balance is perfectly in sync and the pedals feel absolutely incredible to play. It truly feels like playing two independent kick pedals.

    Results below...


    1D73AE2C-23F1-4165-A5DE-B847F285A871.jpeg
    8A7AAD4B-89C7-4E8A-821B-DC717A39464C.jpegFBA4F5C2-711F-4E01-A51B-4AE7EC720101.jpeg
    Attached Files
    Roland TD-50 Modules | Superior Drummer 3 | Tama A2E w/ R-Drums Triggers | ATV & Roland Cymbals | ACD Unlimited Pedals | Tama & Gibraltar HW | RME HDSPe AIO Interface | Mackie ProFX10v3 Mixer | Simmons DA200S Monitor | V-MODA Crossfade M-100 OEMs & Westone UM Pro 50 IEMs

  • #2
    awesome.. (dyna syncs are already awesome) .. and i've always wondered why some pedals have an option on the left pedal
    but lack the spring .. (factory cast i guess) (but how did you get/ make a spring cam for the left pedal ?) ..i bet they play great ..

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Ericdrumz View Post
      awesome.. (dyna syncs are already awesome) .. and i've always wondered why some pedals have an option on the left pedal
      but lack the spring .. (factory cast i guess) (but how did you get/ make a spring cam for the left pedal ?) ..i bet they play great ..
      You can order the parts needed for a complete spring and cam assembly from a few various Tama resellers on the web. I found a shop in PA that was able to get the axle, and another shop on eBay that was able to ship me the spring and cam assembly. The driveshaft is available on Amazon and most other retail outlets.

      You could also harvest everything you need from a used donor single pedal. Buy something cheap on eBay, and you would have everything you need right there. I’m sure that this same effort and process could be applied to most other pedals out there - to include DW, Pearl, Mapex, etc. - if one were inclined to have a go at it...
      Roland TD-50 Modules | Superior Drummer 3 | Tama A2E w/ R-Drums Triggers | ATV & Roland Cymbals | ACD Unlimited Pedals | Tama & Gibraltar HW | RME HDSPe AIO Interface | Mackie ProFX10v3 Mixer | Simmons DA200S Monitor | V-MODA Crossfade M-100 OEMs & Westone UM Pro 50 IEMs

      Comment


      • #4
        ok..cool.. what i did to have less play (up and down) in a slave pedal.. was make the left a direct drive.. there's a hinge under pedal board and one behind cam..
        i kept the right a chain drive.. (right was already fast enough) .. ofcourse you already had both pedals direct drive..

        Comment


        • #5
          I was really pumped to shortlist the Dyna-Sync pedals as the direct drive replacement for my Speedcobras. But they fall short in a lot of ways. I think the Yamaha FP9 takes the crown for the high-end consumer direct drive pedals at this price point.

          Not subzero class Axis or Trick pedals, but includes the subzero features at a lower price. In particular, the double baring drive shaft is standard on the FP9. Plus they've really developed a better and more accessible tension and clamp adjustment.

          TAMA Dyna-sync are easier to break down and have the cobra coils though - and both have adjustable cams which is excellent. But the heal plate design is a deal breaker for me as a lower throne height player. I'm already annoyed by slamming my foot into the blocks at the end of my Speedcobras, the Dyna-sync looks even worse, whereas the FP9 is sloped to ground. I'm undecided what to buy, to this day.
          ◾Diamond Drums 4pc in Di-Noc carbon ◾MegaDRUM ◾Roland UA-1010 / cymbals / KT-10 (x2) ◾Tama / Gibraltar hardware ◾JBL LSR3 Series 2.1 Monitoring ◾Pearl THMP-1
          PA Comparison Table

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Ericdrumz View Post
            ok..cool.. what i did to have less play (up and down) in a slave pedal.. was make the left a direct drive.. there's a hinge under pedal board and one behind cam..
            i kept the right a chain drive.. (right was already fast enough) .. ofcourse you already had both pedals direct drive..
            Very nice option for the Speed Cobras. I didn’t consider playing around with my older Speed Cobras, but may tinker around with them.

            One thing I would highly recommend upgrading is the driveshaft after what I witnessed in my experimentation this go round... Seems like the best overall impact was was that one addition to my setup. Then maybe an additional spring if you get inclined to go further.
            Roland TD-50 Modules | Superior Drummer 3 | Tama A2E w/ R-Drums Triggers | ATV & Roland Cymbals | ACD Unlimited Pedals | Tama & Gibraltar HW | RME HDSPe AIO Interface | Mackie ProFX10v3 Mixer | Simmons DA200S Monitor | V-MODA Crossfade M-100 OEMs & Westone UM Pro 50 IEMs

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Kabonfaiba View Post
              I was really pumped to shortlist the Dyna-Sync pedals as the direct drive replacement for my Speedcobras. But they fall short in a lot of ways. I think the Yamaha FP9 takes the crown for the high-end consumer direct drive pedals at this price point.

              Not subzero class Axis or Trick pedals, but includes the subzero features at a lower price. In particular, the double baring drive shaft is standard on the FP9. Plus they've really developed a better and more accessible tension and clamp adjustment.

              TAMA Dyna-sync are easier to break down and have the cobra coils though - and both have adjustable cams which is excellent. But the heal plate design is a deal breaker for me as a lower throne height player. I'm already annoyed by slamming my foot into the blocks at the end of my Speedcobras, the Dyna-sync looks even worse, whereas the FP9 is sloped to ground. I'm undecided what to buy, to this day.
              I agree that the Dyna Sync is a great pedal, but not perfect... And for $699 I did expect a little better performance and feel out of the slave pedal. But it wasn’t in the $1k range either so I’d say it falls just below the boutique pedals - IE ACD, Czarcie Kopyto, and even Trick and Axis higher end pedals.

              The Yamaha FP9 does look like a fantastic pedal with all the right ingredients. Especially the fact that you can adjust spring tension without having to climb under your kit (kinda like the Micro-Tune springs for Axis). But they still rely on the slave pedal tension to come from the primary assembly - which for whatever reason seems to be everyone’s easy answer... If you snag one, let me know how it works out for you.

              For me, I think I’ll likely take the plunge at some point and snag a set of ACD Unlimited Darwin pedals, but for now this is about as perfect as you can get with a more mainstream brand...
              Roland TD-50 Modules | Superior Drummer 3 | Tama A2E w/ R-Drums Triggers | ATV & Roland Cymbals | ACD Unlimited Pedals | Tama & Gibraltar HW | RME HDSPe AIO Interface | Mackie ProFX10v3 Mixer | Simmons DA200S Monitor | V-MODA Crossfade M-100 OEMs & Westone UM Pro 50 IEMs

              Comment


              • #8
                Yes! ACD Unlimited was the other company I was trying to think of - they started my thought process on this subject.

                I almost bought their direct drive conversion kit for my Speedcobra then realized I could also get the whole footboard before I stopped and wondered WTF I was doing lol.

                Darwin FTW pedals would definitely be my endgame pedals no doubt but there's no way I could justify them - as little playing as I do.
                ◾Diamond Drums 4pc in Di-Noc carbon ◾MegaDRUM ◾Roland UA-1010 / cymbals / KT-10 (x2) ◾Tama / Gibraltar hardware ◾JBL LSR3 Series 2.1 Monitoring ◾Pearl THMP-1
                PA Comparison Table

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by rdubu View Post
                  Thought I’d share a little project I’ve been working on.

                  In my quest to have a perfectly balanced double pedal, I decided to customize my new Dyna-Sync double pedals by adding a 3rd spring assembly to the slave unit.

                  With Tama and most other vendors they place tension springs on the primary drive pedal only, which results in a laggy feeling in the slave drive pedal. You can try to compensate by adjusting spring tension, beater angle, cam angle, etc - but it’s never 100%. The best test to see how close or far off your pedals are is to simply pull both beaters back a few inches and release... The slave pedal beater will swing out of sync and will die out before the primary beater in just about every case.

                  To address this, high end pedals like Trick, Axis, ACD, Czarcie Kopyto, etc all employ springs on the slave pedal which provide better feel and pedal dynamics. I initially went this route by buying a longer beater axle for the slave pedal and then moved the slave spring from the primary to the slave support assembly...

                  2 issues:

                  The first was a pretty big problem. The connecting driveshaft on the Tama pedals has a fair amount of play in the joints which is exacerbated when the spring tension is feeding the drive shaft from the slave side. This caused A LOT of chatter and effectively made the pedal unplayable... The fix - I needed a higher quality drive shaft... which was quickly applied in the form that f a Trick P1V6P drive shaft.

                  Second issue was that even after the new drive shaft - while the pedal was better in feel and responsiveness, it was still dying out and falling out of sync with the primary beater...

                  So I looked at a pair of signature Axis pedals and took note of their 3-spring design. I researched this for a bit and noted that most reviews from people that had the 3-spring setup used the primary-side spring as a supplemental tension point to fine tune the slave pedal’s feel and rebound. So back to the parts bin and about 30 minutes later I had it all together.

                  After quite a bit of experimentation with various tension settings, I’m happy to report that it’s a success. Balance is perfectly in sync and the pedals feel absolutely incredible to play. It truly feels like playing two independent kick pedals.

                  Results below...


                  1D73AE2C-23F1-4165-A5DE-B847F285A871.jpeg
                  8A7AAD4B-89C7-4E8A-821B-DC717A39464C.jpegFBA4F5C2-711F-4E01-A51B-4AE7EC720101.jpeg
                  Hi, it was great to see your 3 spring conversion post! I was thinking the same thing. May I ask from which shop did you order the axle? Was it called drum etc ? How long did it take them to send it to you? Thank you so much!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Yep. Drum Etc. They can get just about any random Tama part if you know what you’re shopping for. Also check out Tama’s website store as well. I ended up sourcing the spring assembly from Tama and the single pedal axle from Drum Etc. All in I got everything in about 3 weeks. I also ended up putting an adjustable beater angle mount for the kick side beater. That I found on eBay...

                    One thing to note - you absolutely have to upgrade the drive shaft. The trick drive shaft works great or you can get one from ACD unlimited as well. Trick is by far less expensive and easier to get in hand, but the ACD driveshaft is a work of engineering art...

                    Good luck and let me know if you have any questions along the way.
                    Roland TD-50 Modules | Superior Drummer 3 | Tama A2E w/ R-Drums Triggers | ATV & Roland Cymbals | ACD Unlimited Pedals | Tama & Gibraltar HW | RME HDSPe AIO Interface | Mackie ProFX10v3 Mixer | Simmons DA200S Monitor | V-MODA Crossfade M-100 OEMs & Westone UM Pro 50 IEMs

                    Comment

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