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I would like to build a Snare Drum compatible with the TD-17

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  • I would like to build a Snare Drum compatible with the TD-17

    Hi everyone, Mongo Drum here.

    I would like to build a Snare Drum compatible with the TD-17. My reading and site surfing I've done so far has shown me that there are a lot of choices out there and a lack of experience here.
    I have some good assembly skills, but it has been a long time since I sat and did any soldiering.
    I would like to build a 13" x 5.5" or 6.5" snare. I know that many like the larger 14" snare and that may be another build in the future for me.
    At this point I don't see spending a lot of money for a high end snare since it will be a Vdrum.

    I would like thoughts on:
    1) What would be the best type of snare with hardware you think would give the best bang for the buck? I've seen some very nice used snares on Ebay.
    2) Triggers, wow, so many to choose from. What trigger(s) do you think would work best? single or multiple?
    3) Are there any good examples already on the board or internet that you have found?

    Looking at the Vdrum sets/kits that have posted I find it very impressive what many of you have done. If you have any thoughts please chime in...
    Thank you
    Mongo
    TD-17KVX with added PDX12 Snare for floor tom.

  • #2
    Honestly, if I were you I’d probably just buy an ATV artist snare and be done with it... $500 and it’s plug and play with just about every module out there. Just my $.02
    Roland TD-30 & TM-6 Modules | Superior Drummer 3 on PC | Tama Superstar Hyper-Drive Maple A2E w/ R-Drums Triggers | ATV aD Cymbals | Tama HW & Pedals | Focusrite Clarett 4Pre | Simmons DA200S Monitor, V-MODA Crossfade M-100 OEMs & MEE MX4 PRO IEMs

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    • #3
      yeah, only $500!!!!!! Something cool about playing one you built. And you can spend the extra cash on Vex pack

      Comment


      • #4
        Honestly, the type of snare drum does not matter much. I have converted cheap no-name chrome snares and more expensive wood snares. Both perform the same once converted. My current snare is a very nice Yamaha snare that I picked up at Music-Go-Round cheap because one of the bearing edges was damaged. The bearing edge did not make any difference with the mesh head so I did not care. I have made my own crossbar triggers and also used Pintech, Roland external and a few others. My current kit is a Tama that I made my own cross bar triggers for and it work very nicely. I don't believe that the TD-17 has positional sensing so triggers would be fairly easy to make. Good luck with the conversion and post some pics when your are done.

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        • #5
          Well if you want to save some money, then buy a cheap 13” snare, some Remo silent strokes (or other inexpensive mesh head), and then drop a Pintech trigger into the shell... For about $300 you could pick up all of the following and have it up and running in about 20 minutes. That’s less than most low-to-mid grade acoustic snares will run you.

          https://pintech.com/product/a2e-conversion-kit/

          https://www.sweetwater.com/store/det...-13-inch-kapur

          https://www.sweetwater.com/store/det...umhead-13-inch

          If you really want to go DIY on the super cheap though, then here’s a quick shopping list and set of directions for the uber-motivated handy guys out there:

          Shopping list: buy a radio shack piezo, a kitchen sponge, some super glue, a can of Folgers coffee, a razor blade, some duct tape, speaker wire, a radio shack TRS jack and cable, assorted brackets, nuts, bolts, and screws, paint stirrers, and bottle of Jack Daniels...

          Step 1 - Drink the entire bottle of Jack Daniels because this is going to be rough ride and you’re going to need to stay calm

          Step 2 - Dump out the coffee, but save it for tomorrow because the hangover from the Jack will be a rager...

          Step 3 - Fashion piezo to paint stirrers with super glue, cover with piece of kitchen sponge (use razor blade to trim)

          Step 4 - Wire up piezo with speaker wire to TRS jack. Don’t solder anything as you’ll likely need rewire something later and you’ll want those connections nice and loose

          Step 5 - Use assorted brackets, nuts, and bolts to attach DIY trigger / paint-stirrer-thingy to inside of Folgers coffee can (you really didn’t think we were going to do anything else with the can did you?)

          Step 6 - Kick out your screen door (preferably front door) and use razor blade to trim out makeshift mesh head for batter side of DIY “snare”

          Step 7 - Use duct tape to affix mesh screen material to DIY “snare”

          Step 8 - Use radio shack TRS cable to plug that mofo in to your module

          Step 9 - Select ANY random trigger pad for trigger type in your module. Seriously, these DIY setups are usually so solid that they just work with every setting on every module

          Step 10 - Beat that thing like you stole it because for this price you practically did... And besides, you’re probably hammered from the Jack at this point anyway so you know anything you play is going to sound awesome

          Step 11 - Wake up the next day, make coffee with Folgers saved from step 2 and objectively swear off drinking for a while

          Step 12 - Throw out DIY “snare” and either buy a ready made option (like the ATV snare I mentioned previously) or quick assembly parts from links provided above

          You’re welcome...
          Roland TD-30 & TM-6 Modules | Superior Drummer 3 on PC | Tama Superstar Hyper-Drive Maple A2E w/ R-Drums Triggers | ATV aD Cymbals | Tama HW & Pedals | Focusrite Clarett 4Pre | Simmons DA200S Monitor, V-MODA Crossfade M-100 OEMs & MEE MX4 PRO IEMs

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          • #6
            Honestly building a basic crossbar trigger for A drums is really easy and works very well. You will need a couple of L-Brackets, crossbar material of some sort (I use square aluminum tubing), a large head bolt and a couple of nuts which all can be found at Home Depot or Lowes. Do a google search on electronic drum crossbar trigger and look at the images to get some ideas. You can also go to the UFO drums site to see how they build theirs. I purchase my piezo/comes on Ebay for about $30, you can get your jack there as well. I have always used the stock settings on my Roland module for a PD-105 or PD-125 and it seems to work just fine.
            There are many posts on here about crossbar triggers so do a search and get some ideas. Good luck!

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            • #7
              Agreed. It really is easy to do a cross bar trigger and costs very little. You can get a 2nd hand snare drum for about Ł50 in the UK so probably around the same in dollars. Apart from the piezo jack plug and mesh head the rest can be made up from metal wood and foam. I did a conversion on a 13” piccolo snare and it was about 60p per trigger a couple of pounds for a jack socket and about 10 for the head. Triggered just as good as the Roland pad. Had to recover the snare back to normal eventually as I needed it to play it acoustically.
              Roland TD30 module on TD20 kit SD3 with various kits. Pearl Masters Kit, Yamaha 9000RC original natural wood finish. Cymbals from Zildgian Pasite and Sabian. Loads of percussion bits. Cubase and Wavelab always current versions.

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              • #8
                A perfectly functional dual zone side-mounted trigger can be made for as little as 2$/€ and minimal skills... I really can't understand the snobbish tone in a certain poster's answers here - the OP posted their question in the DIY section after all. While I would agree that going full DIY just to save money is the wrong approach, many people enjoy the process itself and the satisfaction of using gear they have created themselves. My personal view is that dropping purchased triggers into a shell and calling it DIY is stretching the term somewhat... But I wouldn't try to dissuade someone from doing that if that's what they want, and much less sneer at them.
                MegaDrum module, DIY A2E pads, DIY hall effect 3 zone hi hat, DIY 1, 2 & 3 zone cymbals, DIY kick beater triggers on DIY modded longboard, direct drive pedals, DIY triple driver IEMs, El Cheapo Buttkicker. Various VSTs running in a tweaked Linux Mint. Kit pics thread

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Kent50 View Post
                  Honestly, the type of snare drum does not matter much. I have converted cheap no-name chrome snares and more expensive wood snares. Both perform the same once converted. My current snare is a very nice Yamaha snare that I picked up at Music-Go-Round cheap because one of the bearing edges was damaged. The bearing edge did not make any difference with the mesh head so I did not care. I have made my own crossbar triggers and also used Pintech, Roland external and a few others. My current kit is a Tama that I made my own cross bar triggers for and it work very nicely. I don't believe that the TD-17 has positional sensing so triggers would be fairly easy to make. Good luck with the conversion and post some pics when your are done.

                  You can buy readymade products. What you are paying for is branding, reliability and the lack of any hassle in having to put anything together. Whether you will clearly get a better result than DIY depends on your research, your level of skill making things and which method you choose. Certainly, there would be many many posters on here who have made their own snare triggers etc. and when played side by side with a Roland counterpart, or Yamaha, or Pintech, or ATV, or Drum Tec or whoever... it is possible to end up with something that is indistinguishable from the more expensive ready made fancy stuff.

                  The most important thing is do your research first. Have a really good look around this forum, on Youtube and Google or whatever. I think the biggest mistake you can make is "experiment" endlessly without having done your research and end up spending quite a bit of money to get a result you aren't happy with and then just going and buying something more expensive because you haven't been able to make it yourself. It is also possible to waste a lot of money going down the DIY route, but you can mitigate this risk by doing some strong research and having a clear plan before hand.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by mrantarctica View Post


                    You can buy readymade products. What you are paying for is branding, reliability and the lack of any hassle in having to put anything together. Whether you will clearly get a better result than DIY depends on your research, your level of skill making things and which method you choose. Certainly, there would be many many posters on here who have made their own snare triggers etc. and when played side by side with a Roland counterpart, or Yamaha, or Pintech, or ATV, or Drum Tec or whoever... it is possible to end up with something that is indistinguishable from the more expensive ready made fancy stuff.

                    The most important thing is do your research first. Have a really good look around this forum, on Youtube and Google or whatever. I think the biggest mistake you can make is "experiment" endlessly without having done your research and end up spending quite a bit of money to get a result you aren't happy with and then just going and buying something more expensive because you haven't been able to make it yourself. It is also possible to waste a lot of money going down the DIY route, but you can mitigate this risk by doing some strong research and having a clear plan before hand.
                    Well said and sage advice.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Not trying to dissuade anyone from having a go at building anything themselves... Just making light of the toils that can be had if you go at it without a solid knowledge base ahead of time.

                      As noted by others, there’s definitely some considerations that should be accounted for before you dive in and start buying parts. And yes, it CAN be done for pennies on the dollar if you’re mindful of the materials and handy with common tools.

                      The OP noted a lack of both knowledge and craftsmanship, therefore I recommended going the ready-made or quick assembly route as it would allow them to get hands on with current and proven designs and materials. I’m all for encouragement, but I also believe in providing advice best matched to that of the individual you’re providing advice to.

                      As always, these are just my worthless ramblings and are certainly not intended to ruffle anyone’s feathers. If ever anyone finds themselves slighted, please consider my apologies extended in advance...
                      Roland TD-30 & TM-6 Modules | Superior Drummer 3 on PC | Tama Superstar Hyper-Drive Maple A2E w/ R-Drums Triggers | ATV aD Cymbals | Tama HW & Pedals | Focusrite Clarett 4Pre | Simmons DA200S Monitor, V-MODA Crossfade M-100 OEMs & MEE MX4 PRO IEMs

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by rdubu View Post
                        Not trying to dissuade anyone from having a go at building anything themselves... Just making light of the toils that can be had if you go at it without a solid knowledge base ahead of time.

                        As noted by others, there’s definitely some considerations that should be accounted for before you dive in and start buying parts. And yes, it CAN be done for pennies on the dollar if you’re mindful of the materials and handy with common tools.

                        The OP noted a lack of both knowledge and craftsmanship, therefore I recommended going the ready-made or quick assembly route as it would allow them to get hands on with current and proven designs and materials. I’m all for encouragement, but I also believe in providing advice best matched to that of the individual you’re providing advice to.

                        As always, these are just my worthless ramblings and are certainly not intended to ruffle anyone’s feathers. If ever anyone finds themselves slighted, please consider my apologies extended in advance...
                        Fair comments and no feathers ruffled. However, the OP actually pointed out they had pretty good assembly skills but just a lack of experience with snare drums compatible with their TD-17. They also pointed out that they did not want to spend a lot on a high end snare. Whether they meant that the shell that they used for the purpose, or actually $500 for an ATV snare is perhaps not clear but I think the distinction probably doesn't matter. But I think the key points are the same: 1) research 2) research 3) do more research 4) DIY can save money but be careful about wasting money on DIY if you don't know what you are doing 5) you can also spend a lot of money for things you can build yourself for usually about 50-70% price 5) if you want top quality, then be prepared to spend a little. you definitely get what you pay for in this space

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by mrantarctica View Post

                          ...I think the key points are the same: 1) research 2) research 3) do more research 4) DIY can save money but be careful about wasting money on DIY if you don't know what you are doing 5) you can also spend a lot of money for things you can build yourself for usually about 50-70% price 5) if you want top quality, then be prepared to spend a little. you definitely get what you pay for in this space
                          100% agree
                          Roland TD-30 & TM-6 Modules | Superior Drummer 3 on PC | Tama Superstar Hyper-Drive Maple A2E w/ R-Drums Triggers | ATV aD Cymbals | Tama HW & Pedals | Focusrite Clarett 4Pre | Simmons DA200S Monitor, V-MODA Crossfade M-100 OEMs & MEE MX4 PRO IEMs

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