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Best way attach piezo for finger drumming?

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  • Best way attach piezo for finger drumming?

    I've been having problems with a lack of sensitivity with the way I've been mounting piezos and maybe the type too. I've been using 27mm but now have some 41mm. Two are mounted on thin, hard wood. Two are on metal plates. I used extra hard 2 part epoxy because I thought the brittleness of that glue would transmit vibration better. Also I dodn't wan't them falling off. I've recently read that the piezo's need to be able to flex in order to do their job? So maybe putting a complete layer of this hard glue was stopping that? Could someone suggest the best way to mount the piezo on the wood, metal. Like a ring of something around the edge? I remember trying silicon in the past and it was nowhere near as sensitive as the hard glue but I just put it covering the whole bottom of the piezo. Thanks.

  • #2
    Try just gluing half of the piezo, or even a bit less, leaving the other half 'floating'. The hard glue would let the vibrations transfer from the surface it's glued to, but still doesn't let it vibrate enough if the whole piezo surface is covered. The silicone was probably just dampening all vibration.
    MegaDrum module, DIY A2E pads, DIY hall effect 3 zone hi hat, DIY 1, 2 & 3 zone cymbals, DIY kick beater triggers on DIY modded longboard, direct drive pedals, DIY triple driver IEMs, El Cheapo Buttkicker. Various VSTs running in a tweaked Linux Mint. Kit pics thread

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    • #3
      Iíve just used double sided tape. How are where are you hitting the wood and the proximity of the piezo? Is the wood flexible (like a cajon)
      Roland TD30 module on TD20 kit SD3 with various kits. Pearl Masters Kit, Yamaha 9000RC original natural wood finish. Cymbals from Zildgian Pasite and Sabian. Loads of percussion bits. Cubase and Wavelab always current versions.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by mkok View Post
        Iíve just used double sided tape. How are where are you hitting the wood and the proximity of the piezo? Is the wood flexible (like a cajon)
        No, Its not thick but not flexible at all. I'm not making it flex whatsoever. The piezo is right under or near where I hit. Also often I use light chopsticks to strike. So there's a sharper hit compared to a finger but very small compared to a drumstick.
        Last edited by tttom; 06-10-19, 03:47 PM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by ignotus View Post
          Try just gluing half of the piezo, or even a bit less, leaving the other half 'floating'. The hard glue would let the vibrations transfer from the surface it's glued to, but still doesn't let it vibrate enough if the whole piezo surface is covered. The silicone was probably just dampening all vibration.
          Interesting. I haven't tried that. Maybe make a ring around the edge? I have been taking particular care to glue where the wires are soldered because I've had them come off. I guess just using the minimum amount to help secure them wouldn't hurt? By the way, any suggestions on glue that dries real hard and provides some foundation would be interesting. Thanks
          Last edited by tttom; 06-10-19, 03:48 PM.

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          • #6
            A ring around the edge might also work, but I think my suggestion would make it more sensitive. If you add weight to the free-floating part (a small piece of metal or something), it will be even more sensitive - I think it was Yamaha that did that with their piezos in cymbals. Yes, you can use hot glue (or any other thick glue) on the solder joints to prevent them from detaching. I use this method for all my piezos, but whatever works for you.
            MegaDrum module, DIY A2E pads, DIY hall effect 3 zone hi hat, DIY 1, 2 & 3 zone cymbals, DIY kick beater triggers on DIY modded longboard, direct drive pedals, DIY triple driver IEMs, El Cheapo Buttkicker. Various VSTs running in a tweaked Linux Mint. Kit pics thread

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            • #7
              Two-part epoxy when dry is very hard. It generally takes around 24 hours to harden properly but there are brands that harden much quicker.

              Edit: just re-read your first post and you're already using epoxy, hehe... I've used hot glue and it works well for me. I find it has a nice balance between staying put but also being easy to remove so you can re-use or re-position stuff.
              Last edited by ignotus; 06-10-19, 03:37 PM.
              MegaDrum module, DIY A2E pads, DIY hall effect 3 zone hi hat, DIY 1, 2 & 3 zone cymbals, DIY kick beater triggers on DIY modded longboard, direct drive pedals, DIY triple driver IEMs, El Cheapo Buttkicker. Various VSTs running in a tweaked Linux Mint. Kit pics thread

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              • #8
                Just wanted to point out that my problem is that I don't get many levels of sensitivity. I can always make the settings so something comes out but I have maybe 3 levels of loudness instead of many more levels so we'll see what happens when I get the bigger piezos soon.
                Last edited by tttom; 06-11-19, 02:43 AM.

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