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  • DIY snare ATV aD5

    Hi everyone!

    I am quite new to edrums and DIY,

    I build a head rim trigger similar to the DrumTec, R-Drums, Vdrums Tips construction on a 14” snare. 2 plates top and bottom connected with hex spacers and fixed to the shell lugs I used grommets trying to stop vibration from top plate running to the bottom plate (where the rim piezo is mounted) I used a Roland foam cone and a DrumTec Real Feel mesh head.

    After assembling everything and making sure that all connections are right, I started to have triggering issues, most of the time works well, but from time to time the rim piezo triggers when I hit the mesh. It happen randomly and at different velocities.

    Looks like the rim piezo triggers by the vibrations travelling from the top plate running down the bottom plate.

    I tried to adjust rim head sensitivity and try different pad setup on the module but couldn’t get the right trigger separation.

    If anyone can give me any suggestion on how to fix this issue or give any tip why this can happen it will be really helpful.

    At the moment to fix the issue I attached the rim piezo to the shell, looks like is working but I don’t want to give up on having my trigger system working properly.

    Thanks in advance

    Last edited by Bortx; 04-15-19, 04:36 PM.
    ATV aD5 - Ludwig Breakbeats A2E conversión - Roland VH11 CY15 CY12 C/R - DDT mounted triggers - DIY Snare

  • #2
    Get yourself a cheap scope (sometimes you get old analog ones for a price of a pizza...) and look at the waveforms. Could be that the signal from the cone down along the plate is already making the rim vibrate enough to trigger it's piezo under some circumstances. But who knows, remotely.
    We could all throw in lots of useful and useless comments here, but I think you'll get it sorted more quickly and more reproducable and reliable if you play with the variables at hand by watching things on a scope and see what affects what. I consider a scope mandatory in an electronics lab, without one so much stuff is hit&miss and hearsay.
    gear: MarkDrum YES e-kit highly modified (low-volume trigger cymbals, 16" DIY kick, 12" DIY snare + tom 3, Goedrum HH controller), Triggera 10" splash
    band: http://theboardmusic.com

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    • #3
      Thanks Sacha for your reply, provably you are right!
      And that's why I couldn't figure out by myself, my knowledge in electronics is below basics hahaha,
      Just curious if anyone had experience similar situations and wanted to listen to things to look at...
      A scope would be a good addition in the future if I don't give up... Too much to learn, but always happy to try,

      Thanks,

      Borja
      ATV aD5 - Ludwig Breakbeats A2E conversión - Roland VH11 CY15 CY12 C/R - DDT mounted triggers - DIY Snare

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      • #4
        How exactly could you use a scope to tell if head hit vibrations are making their way to the rim plate? You always talk about a scope but I have no idea how you would use one in an edrum application. Could you attach a picture of you set up?

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        • #5
          I'll try making pics after Easter, I'm currently nowhere near my lab.

          What I was thinking is: when you monitor the waveform of the rim piezo itself, you should see distinct & sharp peaks when you hit along the hoop, but hitting the mesh head should be dampened as much as possible. IMO it is important to have the head piezo decoupled from the shell. But a foam pad is basically a nonlinear lowpass filter, so chances are there's some significant signal bleed left from the head into the rim piezo, but the 'spikes' are greatly reduced. Problem with a big foam pad underneath a head piezo is: when you have a cone on top (thus having the head piezo 'sandwiched' in-between), the piezo will steer away from the hits, as it sinks in slightly. Therefore, the head-piezo dynamics will become more exponential the thicker the bottom foam will be. On a scope, you can watch this happen when the horizontal time is set for a couple of secs, so that subsequent hits can be inspected.
          So, this isolation pad is a trade-off between head-sensor linearity and rim-sensor crosstalk.
          One can perhaps adjust the module triggering for the crosstalk to a bit, or adjust the trigger sensitivity and timing window, but it's generally better to not try cure symptoms but work on the cause. That's why I keep talking people into using a scope. That is normal for me because I do audio DSP for a living, and did study some EE in my former life, but I can understand when others have no real idea of where to start. But there are lots of scope primers on YT, and with some basic understanding of physics it is really not that hard. In fact it is kind of rewarding, and fun, because you immediately get the full picture, and you might end up with something that is more reliable because you know what does what when you exchange components; you can actually see it.
          Last edited by sascha; 04-18-19, 03:23 AM.
          gear: MarkDrum YES e-kit highly modified (low-volume trigger cymbals, 16" DIY kick, 12" DIY snare + tom 3, Goedrum HH controller), Triggera 10" splash
          band: http://theboardmusic.com

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